Children of Thomas Brooks (1775 – 1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock: Jane and Charles Brooks

A Correction of My Big Mistake about Charles Brooks (and Thomas Brooks)

Let me back up a moment to set the stage for my explanation: Some years in the past, a very thorough, generous researcher of my line of the Brooks family, the line of Thomas Brooks (1775-1838), son of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and Margaret Beaumont/Beamon, told me that she had seen documents in Wayne County, Kentucky, records showing Thomas younger with the middle initial M. 

I have searched for any document in Wayne County (or elsewhere) showing Thomas Brooks (1775-1838) with the middle initial M. I have not found any such documents, and my correspondent didn’t send me copies of any. Nonetheless, because she was such a thorough researcher, I took her at her word on this matter and told myself that Thomas Brooks, son of Thomas and Margaret, likely had a middle name beginning with M.

Then, as I was researching Thomas’s son Charles Brooks, about whom I’ll say much more in this posting, I found an interesting federal land patent showing Charles Madison Brooks of Itawamba County, Mississippi, patenting 136.72 acres in Itawamba County on 30 July 1846. Charles, son of Thomas Brooks (1775-1838), moved from Lawrence County, Alabama, to Itawamba County, Mississippi, in 1840.

Since I naively assumed that Charles, son of Thomas Brooks, was the only Charles Brooks living in Itawamba County in the 1840s, I told myself that this federal land record belonged to that Charles, son of Thomas. And I concluded that the middle name Madison also belonged to Charles’s father (Thomas, or Thomas M. Brooks, as I had long thought of him) — and that when Charles’s sister Jane and her husband Dennis Lindsey named a son Thomas Madison Lindsey, they were naming that son for Jane’s father.

Here’s where I have egg on my face now — a lot of it: There actually was a second Charles Brooks living in Itawamba County by 1846, and he was the man who got that piece of federal land on 30 July 1846. I had foolishly never even looked at the 1850 federal census to see whether there was another Charles Brooks in Itawamba County at that time in addition to the son of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock. If I had done so, I’d have found the Charles who got that 1846 land patent, and might then have gone on to discover that researchers of this particular Brooks family (e.g., Jerry Brooks in this good article at the Itawamba County section of the Mississippi GenWeb project) identify Charles Madison Brooks as the son of William Malone Brooks of Franklin County, Alabama, and that a Find a Grave memorial page for him giving his name as Charles Madison Brooks shows he died in an infirmary at Bolivar in Hardeman County, Tennessee, on 29 March 1863.[1] Charles Madison Brooks was a Union soldier in Co. D of the 6th Tennessee Cavalry.

So to sum up this post’s opening confession: Though I’ve told you otherwise in a number of previous postings, Charles Brooks, son of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock, did not have the middle name Madison. In fact, I have found no document giving a middle initial or name to either Charles or his father Thomas Brooks. I was entirely wrong to assume, on the basis of what I had been told about Thomas having the middle initial M. that, if he had a son named Charles Madison Brooks (who turns out not to be the son of Thomas!), then Thomas Brooks was named Thomas Madison Brooks. I will be going back through all postings I’ve made that contain this misinformation, and will be correcting them — and I wanted to tell readers of this blog who may have read those postings about this mistake as I begin this new series of postings on the children of Thomas Brooks and his wife Sarah Whitlock.

With this posting, I’m starting a series tracking the children of Thomas Brooks (1775-1838) and wife Sarah Whitlock (1774-1837) (and see here and here), who married 14 February 1796 in Wythe County, Virginia. As previous postings have indicated, Thomas was the son of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and wife Margaret Beaumont/Beamon of Frederick and Wythe Counties, Virginia, who married 29 January 1771 in Christ Church parish, Middlesex County, Virginia. Sarah was the daughter of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – May 1830) and wife Hannah Phillips of Wythe County, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky.

Jane Brooks (1797-1852), First Child of Thomas and Sarah Whitlock Brooks

1. Jane Brooks: In previous postings, I’ve already provided a comprehensive account of the first child of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock, their daughter Jane. As has been noted, Jane was born 19 February 1797 in Wythe County, Virginia, and she died 9 September 1852 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, where she’s buried with husband Dennis Lindsey in the old family burial ground that was originally on Dennis and Jane’s homeplace. On 18 February 1813 in Wayne County, Kentucky, Jane married Dennis Lindsey, son of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore.

By September 1818, Dennis and Jane moved their young family to Lawrence County, Alabama, where Dennis died 28 August 1836 (and see also here). Dennis was born 28 December 1794 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. Jane appears numerous times in Dennis’s estate documents in Lawrence County, Alabama (and see also here). In a final posting about Dennis and Jane’s life together, I provided a summary of information I have about Jane. Jane and Dennis are my 3-great-grandparents through their son Mark Jefferson Lindsey, who moved from Alabama to northwest Louisiana in the late 1840s, settling in what became Red River Parish in 1870.

Charles Brooks (1800/1 – 1861), Second Child of Thomas and Sarah Whitlock Brooks

2.  The second child of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock was Charles Brooks. As a previous posting notes (and see also here), a bible that belonged to Thomas Brooks and wife Sarah Whitlock Brooks passed to their son Charles, and a transcript of the bible register, with photocopies of some (but not all) entries in it, was published in the journal Itawamba Settlers in 1988.[2] The published transcript does not indicate who owned the bible in 1988, and my attempts to discover its provenance have been unsuccessful. I have not seen the original or a copy of the original bible register — only this published transcript.

Whoever transcribed this bible record apparently could not read clearly the date of birth it gives for Thomas and Sarah’s son Charles. The transcript gives Charles’s birth entry as follows:

Charles Brooks son of Thomas and Sarah Brooks was born December _ in the year of our Lord 180_.

The 1850 federal census suggests that Charles was born in 1800.[3] In 1860, the federal census gives Charles’s age as 59, suggesting a birth year of 1801.[4] Combining the evidence of the bible register (if the original has been faithfully transcribed) with these two documents, I’d conclude Charles Brooks was born in December 1800 or 1801. The sibling prior to Charles, his sister Jane, was born 17 January 1795, according to the bible register, though Jane’s tombstone indicates a birthdate of 19 February 1797 (her parents married 14 February 1796, as previously noted); and the sibling after Charles, his sister Margaret, was born 6 February 1803, according to the bible register, a date her tombstone confirms, as we’ll see when I discuss Margaret.

Charles’s birth year fell between 1797 and 1803, then, and the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses suggest the correct year was either 1800 or 1801. Charles Brooks’s parents were living in Wayne County, Kentucky, at the time of his birth, and I think it’s very likely this is where he was born. Both the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses state that he was born in Kentucky. 

Four years prior to Charles’s birth, his mother Sarah’s brother Charles Whitlock was killed by a falling tree in Wythe County, Virginia. I think Thomas Brooks and wife Sarah likely named their first-born son Charles in honor of his recently deceased uncle.

Lawrence County, Alabama, Records for Charles Brooks

License for Charles Brooks to marry Deniah Cornelius, 24 January 1823, see Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1820, available digitally at FamilySearch
Return of Nathaniel Norwood of marriage of Charles Brooks and Deniah Cornelius, 27 January 1823, see Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1820, available digitally at FamilySearch

On 27 January 1823 in Lawrence County, Alabama, Charles Brooks married Deniah Cornelius, daughter of Rowland Cornelius and Eleanor Watkins of Madison County, Alabama.[5] Charles gave bond for the marriage on 24 January with John Stewart, and a license was granted the same day (see the head of the posting for a digital image of the marrage bond).[6] Written on the license is the return of Rev. Nathaniel Norwood stating that he married the couple on the 27th.  

The Rev. Nathaniel Norwood presiding at the marriage of Charles Brooks and Deniah Cornelius would, I think, be the man of this name who married Sally Stogel in Lawrence County, Alabama, on 27 December 1819.[7] A Nathaniel Norwood who had a brother William Norwood (1771-1850) who is buried in Lawrence County in Arbor cemetery was, indeed, a Baptist minister, but it seems that Nathaniel lived in North Carolina and had a wife Hannah, so I don’t see how he could be the Rev. Nathaniel Norwood performing the marriage of Charles Brooks and Deniah Cornelius — unless he was married more than once and spent time briefly in Alabama before returning to North Carolina. That Rev. Nathaniel Norwood (1782-1870) is buried in Rocky River Baptist cemetery at Siler City in Chatham County, North Carolina.

As noted previously, the John Stewart who gave bond with Charles Brooks for his marriage to Deniah Cornelius married Deniah’s sister Elizabeth. As was also indicated in the posting I’ve just linked, John Stewart often appears in records mentioning Dennis Lindsey, husband of Charles’s sister Jane Brooks — for instance, John Stewart and Dennis Lindsey jointly petitioned the Alabama legislature in 1827 for the erection of a school at Oakville in Lawrence County. John and Dennis were contemporaries, John being born in 1791 and Dennis in 1794. As has also been previously indicated, before Rowland and Eleanor Watkins Cornelius moved to Madison County, Mississippi Territory (later Alabama), in 1809, the Cornelius family lived in Franklin County, Georgia, where an aunt of Charles’s father Thomas Brooks, his aunt Mary Brooks, had settled with her husband Jacob Hollingsworth. Franklin County records show the Hollingsworth and Cornelius families living near each other. 

Note of Charles Brooks acknowledging debt of $3.50 to estate of Thomas Dutton, 25 December 1827, Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 225, folder 36, available digitally at FamilySearch

For the first part of their married life, Charles and wife Deniah remained in Lawrence County, Alabama, where I find Charles affirming a debt of $3.50 to the estate of Thomas Dutton of Lawrence County on 25 December 1827. The original note is in Thomas Dutton’s loose-papers estate file in Lawrence County.[8] As was noted previously, on 19 October 1826, Charles’s brother-in-law Dennis Lindsey and Dennis’s father Mark Lindsey were appraisers of Thomas Dutton’s estate.[9]

20 February 1826 promissory note of Charles Brooks to William McCann, Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 76, folder 8, Matthew Watson vs. Charles Brooks, Lawrence County court case #845, available digitally at FamilySearch

A number of records provide documentation about Charles Brooks in the years in which he and his wife Deniah lived in Lawrence County before they made their move to Itawamba County, Mississippi, in 1840.  On 20 February 1826, Charles made a promissory note for $65 to William McCann. The firm of McCann and Pettigrew then assigned the note to Matthew Watson on 11 January 1827, and Watson sued Charles Brooks for this debt in county court.[10] Charles’s original 20 February 1826 promissory note is preserved in the case file.

Charles Brooks appears on the 1830 federal census in Lawrence County, Alabama, with a household comprised of two males under 5, one male 20-29, 1 female under 5, one female 5-9, and one female 20-29, along with one enslaved female 36-54.[11] The children in the household in 1830 were Sarah Eleanor (born 1823), Thomas Rowland (born 1825), Malinda J. (born 1827), and David A. (born 1828).

As a previous posting indicates, the loose-papers estate file of Charles’s father Thomas Brooks in Morgan County, Alabama, contains a receipt signed by Charles Brooks and his brother-in-law Wesley Huffaker (married Hannah Brooks) on 28 December 1830 for $100 paid to each as legacy money (a digital copy of the receipt is in the posting I have just linked).[12] As the posting I’ve just linked also notes, Thomas Brooks’s 2 October 1838 will states that he had given $100 legacy money to his children Charles, Jane, Alexander, Hannah, and Samuel. The date of this receipt suggests that this legacy money was coming to Thomas Brooks’s children from their grandfather Thomas Whitlock, who died around May 1830 in Cumberland County, Kentucky, and whose estate there was sold in June 1830

Charles Brooks appears in another Lawrence County court case file in 1831 as appraiser, along with Allen McCrary, of several stray horses taken up by John Gibson of Lawrence County. The appraisal document signed by both appraisers, dated 8 June 1831, is in the case file.[13] As a previous posting states, Allen McCrary married Susan Tuttle, daughter of William J. Tuttle and Lucretia Jones, and Susan’s sister Minerva married Charles Brooks’s first cousin James Irwin Brooks, son of James Brooks and Nancy Isbell.

In January 1836, Charles Brooks filed suit against Henry and James Brackin over promissory note they had made on 6 October 1835 to William J. Saffell for $111, which had then passed to Charles and had not been paid.[14] In March 1837, Charles Brooks sued John Rodgers in Lawrence County circuit court regarding a 9 June 1835 promissory note Rodgers had made to Charles Brooks for $100. In both debt suits, the court found in Charles’s favor.[15]  

As a previous posting shows, the inventory of the notes owed to the estate of Dennis Lindsey compiled by Dennis’s administrators John W. Lindsey and James B. Speake, which was presented to Lawrence County court in November 1836, shows that Charles owed several notes to the estate of his brother-in-law Dennis Lindsey.[16]

As another previous posting states, among the documents in the loose-papers estate file of Charles Brooks’s father Thomas Brooks in Morgan County is a promissory noted dated 18 December 1836 and signed by Charles Brooks and Jacob H. Huffaker, which shows the two promising to pay Thomas Brooks $300 for value received from him.[17] With this note is a receipt with Thomas’s signature showing that he was paid $120 on 4 March 1837. The balance appears to have been paid as part of the estate settlement, since there are receipts from Milton McClanahan for it.

Also previously indicated: a 24 March 1837 report of the notes owing to the estate of Dennis Lindsey compiled by Sylvanus Gibson as commissioner in charge of selling the land of Dennis’s estate states that Speake and Irwin had given bond with John Wesley Lindsey, Fielding Wesley Lindsey, and Charles Brooks in the amount of $18,500 as they administered the account from the sale of real property.[18]

A Lawrence County court case file for the case of Isaac N. Owen vs. Nathan J. Galloway, Charles Brooks, and Moses Wood shows Owen, acting as administrator of John Stewart’s estate, suing Galloway, Brooks, and Wood for debt.[19] At issue was a 4 January 1838 promissory note by the three men to John Stewart’s estate, with their signatures, which is preserved in the case file.  

As stated in a previous posting, the estate file of Charles Brooks’s father Thomas Brooks has a promissory note Charles wrote and signed on 8 May 1838, promising to pay his father $45.45 for value received.[20] The posting I’ve just linked has a digital copy of this promissory note.

Charles as Executor of Will of His Father Thomas Brooks, Morgan County, Alabama

As the posting just linked in the preceding paragraph also shows, the 2 October 1838 will of Thomas Brooks in Morgan County, Alabama, stipulates that Thomas’s children Thomas W. Brooks, Margaret Vanwinkle, James Brooks, and Sarah Lindsey were each to have $100 legacy money, the amount of legacy money he had already given to his children Charles Brooks, Jane Lindsey, Alexander Brooks, Hannah Huffaker, and Samuel Brooks.[21] All other money belonging to the estate as it was settled was to be divided equally among the children Thomas had named. 

The will made Charles, the oldest son of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock, as Thomas’s executor, noting that Charles lived in Lawrence County. Charles presented the will in Morgan County court on 16 February 1839, and it was proven in court by Joel W. Hickey, who doctored Thomas in his final illness, and John Wesley Lindsey, son of Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks, on the 25th of February, with John W. Lindsey, Joel Hickey, and David Dinsmore Lindsey, John’s uncle, giving bond with Charles for his execution of the will (and see also here).[22] On the same day the court gave Charles permission to hold the estate sale.[23] Note, too, that in addition to being John Wesley Lindsey’s uncle, David Dinsmore Lindsey married Sarah Brooks, a sister of Charles Brooks.

In March 1839, Franklin B. Pearce sued Charles Brooks in Lawrence County court on behalf of the firm of Hansford and Clonsh (? the second surname is not clear to me over a promissory note Pearce stated that Charles had made to this firm on December 1837 for $100. The promissory note is not in the case file.[24]

As a previous posting recounts, on 20 April 1839, Charles conducted the sale of the movable property of his father’s estate in Morgan County, Alabama.[25] A digital image of the sale account in Charles’s handwriting, the original of which is filed in Thomas’s loose-papers estate file is at this previous posting. As the sale account to which I’ve just pointed shows, the principal buyers were of Thomas Brooks’s estate were his and wife Sarah’s children living in Lawrence County at the time of Thomas’s death — Jane Lindsey and her brothers Charles, James, and Samuel Brooks. Charles purchased “one large Bible” — obviously the bible whose register of births and deaths was, as noted early in this posting, transcribed in the publication Itawamba Settlers in September 1988. In addition, Charles bought a lot of glassware and a glue pot. Both Jane and her brother Charles had married some years prior to their parents’ death — Jane in 1813 and Charles in 1823 — and had established households, so they did not need many of the household goods purchased by their younger siblings Samuel and James.

In a 13 April 1993 letter to me, Corinne Crider of Corsicana, Texas, who researched the Brooks family for many years, tells me that the bible apparently went from Charles to his nephew Christopher Joseph Brooks, son of Charles’s brother Samuel K. Brooks. As we’ll see when I discuss Samuel and his family, as did his brother Charles, Samuel settled in Itawamba County, Mississippi. Corinne Crider based her assumption about the bible’s whereabouts after Charles’s died on the fact that the bible register records the births of Christopher and his spouse Sarah Jane Erwin and of their children.

As noted previously, as executor of his father’s will, on 29 January 1840, Charles Brooks filed a petition in Morgan County court to sell the land of the estate.[26] Since Thomas Brooks’s will states that his land was to go to his sons Samuel and James, I’m not sure if this was land Thomas held in addition to a homeplace being divided among Samuel and James, or the land willed to those two sons. 

Also noted in the posting linked at the beginning of the previous paragraph: On 24 February 1840, Morgan County court minutes show David Dinsmore Lindsey being released as a security for Charles Brooks in Charles’s execution of his father’s estate, with a citation to Charles to appear in court to secure his bond as estate executor.[27] Since Charles Brooks begins appearing in Itawamba County, Mississippi, records shortly after this, I suspect that Charles was moving or had moved to Mississippi at this point, and this is why Dinsmore Lindsey petitioned to be released from his obligation as Charles’s security. As two previous postings note (here and here), on 2 March 1840, Morgan County court minutes say that Charles Brooks failed to appear in court to secure his bond as executor of his father’s estate, and an attachment was issued.

On 10 March 1840, Charles made a final return as executor of his father’s estate and was released as executor, with the estate administration passing from Charles to Milton McClanahan (see the two postings just linked above).[28] The return shows notes in the amount of $2390.45 owed to the estate by Charles himself along with Daniel Shearer, Samuel Brooks and Jacob H. Huffaker, and Alexander M. Brooks. In my view, Charles was in the process of preparing for his move to Mississippi at this time.

On the same date (10 March 1840), Milton McClanahan compiled another inventory of notes owing to the estate of Thomas Brooks, the original of which is found in Thomas’s loose-papers estate file. Those owing the estate included, among others, Charles Brooks with several notes signed by both him and Jacob H. Huffaker. This account also says that Charles Brooks had about 30 barrels of corn he had received as rent for Thomas Brooks’s land in 1839.[29]

As a previous posting states, in Thomas Brooks’s estate file there’s a 9 April 1840 note written by Charles to his brother-in-law Wesley Huffaker in Wayne County, Kentucky, asking Huffaker to pay Milton McClanahan $250 out of a note owed by Daniel Shearer to the estate, with Charles noting that the estate execution had passed from Charles to McClanahan.[30] This suggests that Shearer’s note had somehow passed to into the hands of Wesley Huffaker. A digital copy of Charles’s note to Wesley Huffaker is at the posting I’ve just linked.

As also previously noted, after Milton McClanahan assumed the role of administrator of Thomas Brooks’s estate in April 1840, McClanahan petitioned at April court 1840 in Morgan County to sell Thomas’s real estate and the court gave permission for the land sale.[31]

A case file in Lawrence County shows Charles Brooks filing suit in county court in July 1840 against James Fuller and Berville M. Hodges regarding a promissory note for $65 the two made to Charles on 2 April 1840. Charles filed suit to recover this debt.[32] Not long after this, in my view, Charles moved his family from Lawrence County, Alabama, to Itawamba County, Mississippi, where the next posting will find him as I trace records of his life to his death in Itawamba County on 25 October 1861.


[1] Jerry Brooks suggests that Charles M. Brooks may have had the middle name Malone, but he also identifies Charles M. Brooks as the man obtaining federal land in Itawamba County, Mississippi, in 1846, and since the 1846 land patent is to Charles Madison Brooks, it’s clear that Madison was Charles’s middle name, and not Malone. The Find a Grave memorial page linked above, which was created by Jo Berta Flickinger, gives Charles the middle name Madison.

[2] “Brooks Bible,” Itawamba Settlers 8,3 (September 1988), pp. 151-2.

[3] 1850 federal census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, district 6, p. 350A (dwelling 645/family 652; 9 October). 

[4] 1860 federal census, Itawamba County, Mississippi, Mooresville, p. 131 (dwelling/family 852; 7 August).   

[5] Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. A, p. 110.

[6] See Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1820, available digitally (bond and license) at FamilySearch.

[7] Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. 1, p. 20; and see the marriage license and return by D.W. Wright in Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bond and Licenses 1819, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[8] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 225, folder 36, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[9] Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Bk. C, p. 107.

[10] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 76, folder 8, Matthew Watson vs. Charles Brooks, Lawrence County court case #845, available digitally at FamilySearch

[11] 1830 federal census, Lawrence County, Alabama, p. 288.

[12] See loose-papers probate file of Thomas Brooks held by the Morgan County Archives in Decatur.

[13] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 45, folder 15, Stray, Lawrence County court case #873, available digitally at FamilySearch

[14] Ibid., box 50, folder 50, Charles Brooks vs. Henry and James Brackin, Lawrence County court case #1912, available digitally at FamilySearch

[15] Ibid., box 14, folder 10, Charles Brooks vs. John Rodgers, Lawrence County circuit court case #2215, available digitally at FamilySearch

[16] The original inventory of notes is in Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 171, folder 6, Jane Lindsey vs. John W. Lindsey and James B. Speake as administrators of Dennis Lindsey, Lawrence County court case #247, available digitally at FamilySearch. A transcript is in Lawrence County’s Orphans Court Inventory and Will Book 1835-1841, pp. 236-7.

[17] See loose-papers probate file of Thomas Brooks held by the Morgan County Archives in Decatur.

[18] Lawrence County, Alabama, Inventory and Will Bk. 1835-1841, pp. 347-8

[19] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 185, folder 19, Isaac N. Owen vs. Nathan J. Galloway, Charles Brooks, and Moses Wood, Lawrence County chancery court case #3470, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[20] See loose-papers probate file of Thomas Brooks held by the Morgan County Archives in Decatur.

[21] See ibid. for the original; the court copy is in Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Final Record Bk. 7, pp. 134-5. 

[22] See loose-papers probate file of Thomas Brooks held by the Morgan County Archives in Decatur, and Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 5, pp. 343 and 354. 

[23] Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 5, p. 354.

[24] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-195, box 71, folder 6, Franklin B. Pearce vs. Charles Brooks, Lawrence County court case (the file has no case number), available digitally at FamilySearch

[25] Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Final Record Bk. 7, pp. 152-3. Charles’s return of the sale account is in Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 5, p. 369.

[26] Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 5, p. 383.

[27] Ibid.

[28] Ibid., pp. 391-2.

[29] See loose-papers probate file of Thomas Brooks held by the Morgan County Archives in Decatur.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Morgan County, Alabama, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 5, p. 397.

[32] Lawrence County, Alabama, Mixed Court Records, 1818-1950, box 9, folder 9, Charles Brooks vs. James Fuller and Berville Hodges, Lawrence County court case #3085, available digitally at FamilySearch

2 thoughts on “Children of Thomas Brooks (1775 – 1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock: Jane and Charles Brooks

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