Bridget Tobin Ryan (1818-1873) of Co. Kilkenny, Ireland: Records Possibly Pointing to Her Family Members

Tithe Applotment listing for Edd Tobin, Deerpark townland, Rossinan civil parish, County Kilkenny, 1833

Or, Subtitled: In the Absence of Records Necessary to Prove Genealogical Connections, One Goes A-Fishing

In a previous posting, I explained my reasons for concluding that my ancestor Bridget Tobin, who was born in 1818 in County Kilkenny, Ireland, and who married Valentine Ryan, son of John Ryan and Margaret Oates, in Kilmacow parish on 20 January 1833, perhaps had a sister Catherine who married John Walsh in the same parish on 20 January 1833. The same posting notes that Daniel Tobin married Bridget Walsh in Kilmacow parish on 12 February 1832. My posting asks if it’s possible that Daniel Tobin is another sibling of Bridget Tobin Ryan. I also noted that Edmond Tobin married Mary Comerford in Templeorum parish on 23 July 1839, with the marriage record stating that the couple lived at Buckstown. That would place Daniel in the same area as Bridget, Catherine, and Daniel, and would point to the possibility that he could be another sibling of Bridget.

John Ryan (Bef. 1785) and Wife Margaret Oates of Piltown, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland: New Information

Engraving of Bessborough House, County Kilkenny, Ireland, from John Preston Neale, Views of the Seats of Noblemen and Gentlemen in England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland , vol. 2 (London : Sherwood, Neely, and Jones, 1820), p. 273

Or, Subtitled: Papers of Landed Estates as Sources of Genealogical Information

In previous postings (here and here), I’ve told you that the earliest ancestor I’ve been able to prove in my southern County Kilkenny, Ireland, Ryan family is a John Ryan who appears to have been born prior to 1785, and who married Margaret, daughter of John Oates and Eleanor Thompson of Tybroughney/Tibberaghney, a townland in the civil parish of Fiddown in County Kilkenny. As the postings that I’ve just linked tell you, I first catch sight of John and Margaret Oates Ryan in the register of their Catholic parish, Templeorum, when their first child, a son named Valentine, was baptized in that parish on 6 May 1805.

Family of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin of County Kilkenny, Ireland, and Grant County, Arkansas: New Information (3)

Map of County Kilkenny from John Savage, Picturesque Ireland : A Literary and Artistic Delineation of the Natural Scenery, Remarkable Places, etc. (New York: T. Kelly, 1885), highlighting Mullinavat

Or, Subtitled: Interesting Connections Between 19th-Centutry Ryans, Costellos (and Tobins and Walshes) in Buckstown (Killahy Civil Parish, Inchacarran Townland), County Kilkenny, Ireland

In my previous posting, I shared how I have used early 19th-century Catholic parish records (which are often sparse) of baptisms, marriages, and deaths to tease out some new clues regarding possible relatives of my ancestor Bridget Tobin, who married Valentine Ryan, son of John Ryan and Margaret Oates of Templeorum Catholic parish, on 21 September 1836 in Kilmacow Catholic parish. As a map I included in the posting I have just linked shows, Templeorum parish is contiguous to Mullinavat Catholic parish, where Valentine and Bridget Tobin Ryan lived following their marriage. As that posting also states, Mullinavat parish was separated from Kilmacow parish in 1842; the map shows that Mullinavat and Kilmacow are adjoining Catholic parishes. 

Family of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin of County Kilkenny, Ireland, and Grant County, Arkansas: New Information (2)

Record of the marriage of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin, Kilmacow Catholic parish, County Kilkenny, Ireland, 21 September 1836, from Ossory diocesan transcript of parish records in a microfilm copy at the National Library of Ireland under the title Catholic Parish Registers (microfilm 05028/04)

Or, Subtitled: The Challenge of Teasing Genealogical Clues from Sparse Early 19th-Century Irish Catholic Records

I’ve told you that I have not been able to find information about the family of my 2nd-great-grandmother Bridget Ryan, who married Valentine Ryan in Kilmacow Catholic parish, County Kilkenny, Ireland, on 21 September 1836 with Edmond Hayden and Margaret Fitzgerald as witnesses. The marriage took place at Mullinavat, where Valentine and Bridget lived after marrying, and from which they and their children emigrated to America.

Family of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin of County Kilkenny, Ireland, and Grant County, Arkansas: New Information

Watercolor painting of the ship James Nesmith by artist Duncan McFarlane (1818-1865), online at the invaluable website, from an auction held by Bourgeault-Horan Antiquarians in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in August 2008

Or, Subtitled: Things Are Seldom Quite as Simple as One Would Like in Genealogical Research, Are They?

Throwback Thursday they call it, right? This posting is a throwback to a series of posts I did in April 2018, which began with this posting entitled “In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan.” The series that begins with the linked posting above (you can follow the whole series by clicking on the next posting at the bottom of the page) tracks the roots of Valentine Ryan (1811-1881) and wife Bridget Tobin (1818-1873) of southern County Kilkenny, Ireland. As the series explains, Valentine was the son of John Ryan and Margaret Oates of Templeorum Catholic parish — the family lived in Belline and Rogerstown townland in Fiddown civil parish, at a place in that townland called Logriach or Loughreagh, which is part of Piltown.[1] Margaret,the daughter of John Oates and Eleanor Thompson, was from nearby Tybroughney/Tibberaghny, also part of Piltown. Tybroughney/Tibberaghny is the townland bordering Belline and Rogerstown to the east.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1812 – 1879) by Wives Louisa F. Styles and Mary S. Roman (Cunningham)

Photo of William Thomas Gordon from 18 April 1921 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 1578, certificates 23250-23625, 22 April 1921-23 April 1921; certificate 23487
Photo of Mary Belle Gordon from 6 February 1919 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 707, certificates 65000-65249, 19 February 1919-21 February 1919; certificate 65132

Or, Subtitled: A Branch of a Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Lindsey Family Establishes Itself in Atlanta Area by 1900

This posting is a continuation of a previous posting in which I discuss what I know about Dennis Lindsey (1812-1879), son of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As that posting shows, by 1842, Dennis had settled in Hamburg, which was then in Edgefield District, South Carolina, where he spent his life up to the final year or two working as a cotton merchant. On 5 March 1843, he married Louisa F. Styles, daughter of Gabriel B. Styles and Rebecca Wood Farrow of Spartanburg County. 

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Dennis Lindsey (1812 – 1879)

Tombstone of Dennis and Mary S. Roman Lindsey, Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, from his Find a Grave memorial page, created by M Long; photo by M Long

Or, Subtitled: “A Man of Affairs, Very Outstanding in Hamburg”

This posting is one in a series discussing the family of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The series first discusses William and Rachel, then tracks their children. It begins with this linked posting, and can be followed from that posting down to the current one, if you click on each subsequent posting after you read the posting I have just linked. Dennis Lindsey was the last of the nine children of William and Rachel Lindsey. His tombstone in Magnolia Cemetery in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, where he’s buried with his second wife Mary S. Roman Lindsey, says that he was born in 1812 and died in 1879.[1]

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Rachel Lindsey and Second Husband William Halbert

William Halbert to Thomas M. Young, 9 March 1843, Laurens County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. O, p. 183
Relinquishment of dower by Rachel Lindsey Halbert for sale to Thomas M. Young, April 1843, Laurens County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. O, p. 187

Or, Subtitled: “Being Unfortunate in His Business He Moved”

This posting continues a discussion of records documenting the life of Rachel Lindsey (1800/1810 – 1845), daughter of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In two previous postings about Rachel (here and here), I discussed her first husband Jacob Cooper, whom Rachel appears to have married between 1820-1828, and her family by Jacob. As the previous posting (the second link in the preceding sentence) notes, following Jacob’s death in Spartanburg County sometime before 15 November 1829, Rachel then remarried between 28 January and 26 April 1830 to William Anson Halbert of Laurens County. Rachel appears in the estate sale documents of Jacob Cooper on 28 January as Rachel Cooper, but on 26 April 1830, William Halbert applied to Spartanburg County court to be made administrator of Jacob Cooper’s estate, noting that he had married Rachel, Jacob’s widow. It’s likely this marriage occurred on or near to 26 April 1830.[1]

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Rachel Lindsey and First Husband Jacob Cooper (2)

15 November 1829 summons by Thomas Bomar, Spartanburg court of ordinary, announcing Isaac Lindsey’s application for probate of the will of Jacob Cooper, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose-papers estate file of Jacob Cooper, file 580

Or, Subtitled: “Sail Bills,” Meeting Houses, and Family Squabbles

As the previous posting notes, the Spartanburg county loose-papers estate file of Jacob Cooper and the case file for the equity court case his widow Rachel Lindsey Cooper pursued on behalf of herself and their son Jacob Henry Cooper against the other heirs of the estate contain rich genealogical information, enabling us to document quite a bit of this family’s history over a considerable length of time.[1] In what follows, I want to discuss these two sets of documents and to note what they tell us about the Cooper family.

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Rachel Lindsey and First Husband Jacob Cooper (1)

History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Goodspeed: Chicago, 1888), p. 1059

Or, Subtitled: “There Is Some Confusion… More Information Is Sought

This posting is a continuation of my discussion of the children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In three previous postings, I discussed William and Rachel’s children Cassandra, John, and Nicy Malinda, then their children Elizabeth and Isaac, and then their sons Mark and Henry Lindsey.