Children of Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822)

Tombstone of Hannah Hollingsworth Brown from her Find a Grave memorial page, Nacoochee Methodist cemetery, Sautee, White County, Georgia — see n. 3, infra

As we saw in the previous posting, the will that Jacob Hollingsworth made in Franklin County, Georgia, on 15 May 1815 names his children, noting that his son Samuel and daughter Sarah (Garner) had both predeceased him.[1]BBefore I start telling you what I know about Jacob’s children, a proviso: I haven’t done exhaustive research on them. What I’m sharing now are bits and pieces I’ve gathered through desultory research. Some researchers have done much more work than I have on some of these children — e.g., Sadie Greenings Spark on Samuel, James, and Benjamin[2] — and I’ll point you to that research as I discuss the children of Jacob Hollingsworth and wife Mary Brooks, who were as follows:

Thomas Madison Brooks (1775-1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock (1774-1837): Alabama Years, 1836-1838

Original will (holographic, page 1) of Thomas Madison Brooks of Morgan County, Alabama,, 2 October 1838, in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County Archives

Or, Subtitled: The Mystery of an Estate Selling Land to Which the Decedent Does Not Have Title

With this posting, I’ll provide information about the final phase of the lives of Thomas Madison Brooks and wife Sarah Whitlock, after they moved in November 1836 from Wayne County, Kentucky, to Morgan County, Alabama, to join their adult children who had settled in adjoining Lawrence County, where Thomas’s brother James had died in 1835and Wayne County neighbors including Rev. Elliott Jones.  As I state at the end of the previous posting, because both Thomas and Sarah died not very long after they made their final move to Alabama, and doctors’ receipts in Thomas’s estate file indicate that medications like laudanum and morphine were prescribed for what appear to have been painful illnesses, I suspect that both were already sick at the time of their move, perhaps both with a lingering, debilitating illness such as cancer.

Thomas Madison Brooks (1775-1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock (1774-1837): Kentucky Years, 1798-1836

Thomas Brooks’s affidavit, 10 March 1804, Wayne County, Kentucky, in Whitlock v. Whitlock, Commonwealth of Virginia Chancery District Court, Staunton, box 10, file 38

Or, Subtitled: “A Rough Hardy Race of Men, Very Large & Stout, & Altogether an Excellent Population, for a New Country”

Thomas and Sarah Brooks Establish Their Young Family in Kentucky (1798-9)

In the previous posting about Thomas Madison Brooks (1775-1838), I track him up to 1798, when he moved with wife Sarah Whitlock and infant daughter Jane from Wythe County, Virginia, to Pulaski (soon to be Wayne) County, Kentucky. As that posting notes, when the Brooks family made that move, Thomas and Sarah were a young couple, he 23 and she 24. You may have noticed that the previous postings discussing the Virginia beginnings of this Brooks family cited no records for Thomas in Wythe County other than tax records — with the exception of the record in his family bible stating that Thomas and Sarah married 14 February 1796.

Thomas Madison Brooks (1775-1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock (1774-1837): Virginia Beginnings, 1775-1798

“Brooks Bible,” Itawamba [Mississippi] Settlers 8,3 (September, 1988), pp. 151-2

Or, Subtitled: A Virginia ➤ Kentucky ➤ Alabama Migration Pattern

Introduction: Now the Brooks Family Line

At the end of April 2021, I completed a lengthy series of postings that I began in November 2019. This series shared my information about my Lindsey immigrant ancestor, Dennis Linchey, who arrived in Richmond County, Virginia, aboard the ship Expectation some time before 1 June 1718 as an indentured servant from Ireland, and about his descendants. The series of postings that runs from November 2019 to April 2021 provides all the information I have about the descendants of Dennis Linchey, whose surname shifted to Lindsey before his death in August 1762 in Granville County, North Carolina — though my series does not follow family lines down to the last generations in each line.

The Conundrum of Sorting John Lindseys, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Latter Half of 1700s and Early 1800s

South Carolina Colonial Plat Bk. 9, p. 1

Or, Subtitled: “’Curiouser and curiouser!’ Cried Alice”

These notes about the challenge of sorting men named John Lindsey in records of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, in the latter part of the 1700s and early part of the 1800s begin with the conundrum of a 20 March 1817 deed of William Lindsey to Spencer Bobo, both of Spartanburg County.[1] I discussed this deed in detail in a previous posting. As that posting notes, William Lindsey deeded to Spencer Bobo 200 acres on which William was then living, stating that he was selling “all the plantation and tract of Land where I now live supposed 200 acres more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging N. adjoining said Bobo’s land, E. joining Brewton, S. joining John Lindsey, and W. joining John Crocker.” The witnesses to this deed were John Lindsey and James Brewton/Bruton.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1812 – 1879) by Wives Louisa F. Styles and Mary S. Roman (Cunningham)

Photo of William Thomas Gordon from 18 April 1921 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 1578, certificates 23250-23625, 22 April 1921-23 April 1921; certificate 23487
Photo of Mary Belle Gordon from 6 February 1919 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 707, certificates 65000-65249, 19 February 1919-21 February 1919; certificate 65132

Or, Subtitled: A Branch of a Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Lindsey Family Establishes Itself in Atlanta Area by 1900

This posting is a continuation of a previous posting in which I discuss what I know about Dennis Lindsey (1812-1879), son of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As that posting shows, by 1842, Dennis had settled in Hamburg, which was then in Edgefield District, South Carolina, where he spent his life up to the final year or two working as a cotton merchant. On 5 March 1843, he married Louisa F. Styles, daughter of Gabriel B. Styles and Rebecca Wood Farrow of Spartanburg County. 

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Dennis Lindsey (1812 – 1879)

Tombstone of Dennis and Mary S. Roman Lindsey, Magnolia Cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, from his Find a Grave memorial page, created by M Long; photo by M Long

Or, Subtitled: “A Man of Affairs, Very Outstanding in Hamburg”

This posting is one in a series discussing the family of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The series first discusses William and Rachel, then tracks their children. It begins with this linked posting, and can be followed from that posting down to the current one, if you click on each subsequent posting after you read the posting I have just linked. Dennis Lindsey was the last of the nine children of William and Rachel Lindsey. His tombstone in Magnolia Cemetery in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, where he’s buried with his second wife Mary S. Roman Lindsey, says that he was born in 1812 and died in 1879.[1]

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Elizabeth and Isaac

Tombstone of Isaac Lindsey, Cedar Grove Baptist cemetery, Fountain Inn, Laurens County, South Carolina, photo uploaded by gerald to Isaac’s Find a Grave memorial page created by Robin Farley Dixson Coon

Or, Subtitled: Those Darned Census Entries That Name Folks by Initials

This is the second in a series of postings discussing the children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and wife Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In a previous posting, I discussed this couple’s first three children, Cassandra, John, and Nicy Malinda. These postings about the children of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest follow two postings in which I discussed William and Rachel in detail — here and here. The following posting begins with the fourth child of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest, their daughter Elizabeth.

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Cassandra, John, Nicy Malinda

Biography of John Jefferson Johnson, Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State’s Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People, vol. 1 (Atlanta: Southern Historical Association, 1895), pp. 299-300

Or, Subtitled: Tracking Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Lindseys to Georgia and Points West

This posting about the children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, is a continuation of a series of postings about this family. The first two postings in this series are here and here. Since William and Rachel had a large family of nine (known) children, I’ll post about the children of this family in several groups. This posting deals with their first three (?) children, Cassandra, John, and Nicy Malinda. I use a question mark here because, as explained below, I know so little about John that I’m not entirely sure where he fits in the order of children born to William and Rachel.

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) (2)

Coroner’s inquisition report for William Lindsey, Spartanburg County Quorum Court, “The State vs. the Dead Body of William Lindsey,” Coroner’s Inquisition, online at the CSI: Dixie site of the Center for Virtual History at University of Georgia (p. 1)

Or, Subtitled: “The Unkindest Cut of All — It Were Well It Had Slept in the Inventive Brain of the Aforesaid William Halbert

This posting, which examines the life of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, from 1830 up to William’s death in 1840 (and beyond that date, in the case of his wife Rachel) is the second in a series of postings about William and his family. The first posting in the series is here.