Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Sarah Whitlock (1774 – 1837) and Husband Thomas Brooks

13 November 1839 account of Jane Brooks Lindsey in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County Archives

Sarah Whitlock was, if I have the children of Thomas Whitlock and Hannah Phillips ordered correctly, the couple’s fourth child. Sarah’s my 4th-great-grandmother. I’ve shared all that I know about her life in a number of previous postings. As this previous posting states, Sarah’s name is recorded in a family bible that belonged to her and her husband Thomas Brooks, and which passed from them to their oldest son Charles Brooks.[1] This bible is discussed in another previous posting

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Charles Whitlock (abt. 1773 – 1796) and Wife Mary Davies

Augusta County, Virginia, Chancery Court case, Whitlock vs. Whitlock, box 10, file 38 (1803-4), available digitally via Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory chancery records collection

The next child of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and wife Hannah Phillips, their third child if I have their children in correct order, was a son Charles Whitlock. A number of previous postings contain biographical information about Charles. As I state in a previous posting, in my view, Thomas and his siblings were likely raised by their older brother Charles after the Whitlock parents, James Whitlock and Agnes Christmas, died, James in 1749 in Louisa County, Virginia, and Agnes between 1750 and 1757, probably also in Louisa. 

I don’t have documentary proof of my deduction that, as the oldest of James and Agnes’s children, Thomas’s brother Charles brought his younger siblings to Albemarle County, where he lived from 1760 or a bit earlier up to around 1780, when he moved to Surry County, North Carolina. But such information as I have suggests to me that this is what happened. As the posting linked above states, in my view Thomas Whitlock named his only son Charles after the older brother who raised him.

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Daughter Who Married John Hammons (2)

Warren County, Tennessee, Deed Bk. L, pp. 204-5

Warren County, Tennessee, Years, 1807-1819

As the previous posting indicates, John Hammons Jr. disappears from the Wayne County tax list after 1807, when he moved with his father and brothers Leroy and Woodson to Warren County, Tennessee. On 7 August 1807, John entered 100 acres in White County by virtue of warrant #1686. The land entry states that the land was assigned to John by D. Ross by his attorney J. (or T.?) Hopkins, assignee of Stokely Donelson, assignee of Patrick Hamilton. The entry was location #143 in the 3rd district, and adjoined John’s occupant claim, location #141 and Martin Harpool.[1]

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Daughter Who Married John Hammons (1)

Wayne County, Kentucky, Court Order Bk. A, p. 5

According to Margaret Austin of Bay Village, Ohio, who researched the Hammons family exhaustively for years and shared her research notes with me in April 1997, Thomas Whitlock’s son-in-law John Hammons appears to have been born about 1770-2. Margaret based this date on the fact that John Hammons Jr. appears on a jury list in Patrick County, Virginia, on 13-14 August 1793 in the cases of Lyne vs. King and Adams vs. Mankin and Keaton.[1] Margaret Austin’s notes also state that John Hammonds Jr. provided a deposition on 8 October 1792 in the Patrick County case of Dickerson vs. Laurance, and was sued on 13 May 1793 for debt in Patrick County in the case of Senter vs. Hammonds Jr. Note the variant spellings of the surname: Hammons and Hammonds (as well as Hammon/Hammond).

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Daughter Who Married William Hannah

Original will of John Hanna, 15 April 1793, Surry County, North Carolina, on file with the North Carolina state archives, available digitally at FamilySearch

I’m now resuming my chronicle of the life and family of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Virginia and Kentucky, which I interrupted in the past several weeks to report on new information I discovered on a trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, most of it having to do with my Lindsey and Brooks lines, which connect to Thomas Whitlock’s family through the marriage of his daughter Sarah to Thomas Brooks, and the marriage of Thomas and Sarah Whitlock’s daughter Jane to Dennis Lindsey.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Cumberland County Estate Documents

Cumberland County, Kentucky, Will Bk. B, pp. 428-430

This posting is a continuation of a previous one discussing Thomas Whitlock’s final years in Cumberland County, Kentucky. That posting ended with a transcription of the will Thomas made on 22 January 1824 in Cumberland, County, which was proved in Cumberland County at May court 1830. As my final comments in the posting I’ve just linked state, in my view, Thomas likely died in 1830, perhaps in May or shortly before May. In what follows, I’ll discuss Thomas Whitlock’s estate documents, which include an estate inventory and appraisal, an account of the sale of his estate, and a final settlement.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Cumberland County Years

Cumberland County, Kentucky, Will Bk. B, pp. 423-4

It has been quite some time, hasn’t it, since I told readers following my series of postings about Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) that, having disposed of his land in Wythe County, Virginia, in May 1805 and moved to Cumberland County, Kentucky (perhaps with a brief sojourn in Surry County, North Carolina), I’d complete Thomas’s story by discussing his years in Kentucky? After I promised to do that, I spent two weeks at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, and since that time, have been busy sharing notes here on items I found during that research trip which fill in gaps in previous postings on this blog.

Ruth Brooks (1775/1780 – 1837 and Husband John Greenwood, and Mary Rice (1776/8 – abt. 1825) and Husband Joshua Wilson: Additions to Previous Postings

Drew Smith, Organize Your Genealogy (Cincinnati: Family Tree Books, 2016), p. 108

Or, Subtitled: Accentuate the positive, eliminate the negative

Sometimes our searches for genealogical records yield negative results. That is, we search for material we hope or even expect to find in vital records, land records, court records, etc., and find that no such material is there. Part of the process of genealogical research is noting the lack of records for which we’ve done careful searches.

Margaret Brooks (1772 – 1857) and Husband Joseph Day: Additional Material

Montgomery County, Virginia, Plat Bk. B, p. 147
Montgomery County, Virginia, Plat Bk. D, p. 468
Montgomery County, Virginia, Plat Bk. D, p. 552

Or, Subtitled: The Value of Land Records to Pinpoint When Families Moved Hither and Yon

Here’s some more material I’ve added to a previous posting after I did research recently at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City and had access there to records locked to people accessing the FamilyHistory site via our home computers. When I posted here this past March about Margaret Brooks (1772 -1857), daughter of Thomas Brooks and Margaret Beaumont/Beamon, and her husband Joseph Day, I noted that some of the Montgomery County land records I was citing from him, using research done by Elsie Davis and Mary B. Kegley, were inaccessible to me.

Margaret Brooks (1803 – 1855) and Husband Ransom Van Winkle: Additional Material

Kentucky Land Grants Bk. S, p. 116

Or, Subtitled: And more new material to add to old postings

Here’s another posting to which I added material in the past two weeks as I did research at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, adding material to previous postings here when I had access to documents that are under lock and key in the FamilySearch system, unless you access those files through a computer in the Family History Library system: