Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Louisiana Years

Lindsey, John Wesley Death Record, Proceedings of the M.W. Grand Lodge of the State of Louisiana (title)
Proceedings of the M.W. Grand Lodge of the State of Louisiana, Free and Accepted Masons, Ninety-First Grand Communication (New Orleans: A.W. Hyatt, 1903), title page.
Lindsey, John Wesley Death Record, Proceedings of the M.W. Grand Lodge of the State of Louisiana (p. 150)
Proceedings of the M.W. Grand Lodge of the State of Louisiana, Free and Accepted Masons, Ninety-First Grand Communication (New Orleans: A.W. Hyatt, 1903), p. 150.

Or, Subtitled: When Tombstone Information May Lead Us Astray

My postings have now followed John Wesley Lindsey, oldest child of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks, from his birth in Wayne County, Kentucky, in 1814, to his move with his parents in 1817 to what would soon be Lawrence County, Alabama, where he grew up and married Margaret S. Gibson in 1836, and, finally, to his life in Itawamba and Lee Counties, Mississippi, from 1839 to around 1870, when he and his second wife Mary Louisa, widow of Robert O. Maupin, moved to northwest Mississippi for a few years. As I stated at the end of my last posting, I don’t have abundant information about John’s life after he married a third wife, the widow Mary Ann Wester on 15 December 1878 in Red River Parish, Louisiana. Continue reading “Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Louisiana Years”

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Mississippi Years

Detail from Colton's 1855 Map of Mississippi
Detail from G. Woolworth Colton’s 1855 map of Mississippi showing Van Buren, Itawbamba County — from Colton’s Atlas of the World (New York : J.H. Colton, 1855-56), at the Library of Congress website

Or, Subtitled: Westward Ho As Businesses Falter and New Opportunities Beckon

In my first posting tracking the life of John Wesley Lindsey, son of Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks, in Wayne County, Kentucky, and Lawrence County, Alabama, up to 1840, I noted that John had long puzzled me: I could track his life up to the point that he disappears from records of Itawamba and Lee County, Mississippi, around 1870, but after that, I couldn’t follow him. I couldn’t follow him until I realized that he was the J.W. Lindsay who married M.A. Wester in Red River Parish, Louisiana, on 15 December 1878, and that he and Mary Ann Nobles Wester then settled at Marthaville in Natchitoches Parish, where John died in 1903. The families of John’s siblings Mark Jefferson Lindsey, Margaret Lindsey Hunter, and Rebecca Lindsey Kellogg had all settled in Red River Parish, and John had evidently gone out to Louisiana to join them by 1878. Continue reading “Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Mississippi Years”

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Wayne County, Kentucky, and Lawrence County, Alabama, Years

Lindsey, John W., Signature to Original Will of Thomas Brooks
John Wesley Lindsey’s signature as witness to will of his grandfather Thomas M. Brooks, 2 October 1838, Morgan County, Alabama (from loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks, Morgan County)

Or, Subtitled: Weathervane Turns on Fortunes of North Alabama Merchant Planters in 1830s

John Wesley Lindsey’s Birth in Wayne County, Kentucky, April 1814

In line with their strong Methodist commitments, Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks named their first child (and eldest son) John Wesley, after the founder of Methodism. As we’ve seen, Dennis had a brother who also bore the name Wesley — Fielding Wesley Lindsey. Another brother, William Burke Lindsey, was named for the first Methodist circuit rider in Wayne County, Kentucky, at the time the Lindsey family lived there. John B. McFerrin, another Methodist circuit rider whom James Edmond Saunders mentions in connection with Mark and Dennis Lindsey in his Early Settlers of Alabama, as we’ve noted, provides abundant information about William Burke in his History of Methodism in Tennessee.[1] Continue reading “Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: John Wesley Lindsey (1814-1903) — Wayne County, Kentucky, and Lawrence County, Alabama, Years”

The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Dennis Lindsey’s Wife Jane Brooks (1797-1852) and Their Children

Lindsey, Jane, Account for Boarding Mother and Father
Account of care Jane Brooks Lindsey’s provided nursing and lodging her parents in the final months of their lives, 13 November 1839, from loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks, Morgan County, Alabama

Or, Subtitled: Losing a Husband and Both Parents within Two Years and Carrying On

Notes About Jane Brooks, Wife of Dennis Lindsey

I have to admit that, in doing family history, I sometimes find myself being partial to one ancestor more than the rest. Jane is one of those ancestors to whom I’m partial. As I think about her life, what stands out is the amazing strength she displayed in trying times. I admire her. As I noted in a previous posting, when her husband Dennis Lindsey died at the age of 41, he left her a young widow of 39 with eleven children, four of them not over 10 years of age. One, the couple’s last son Dennis James, was a newborn, in fact. Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Dennis Lindsey’s Wife Jane Brooks (1797-1852) and Their Children”

The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: David Dinsmore Lindsey (1815 – 1873)

 

Lindsey, David Dinsmore, Moulton Advertiser, 22 Dec 1908, p. 1, col. 5-6 (1)
S.W. Barbee, “Old Lawrence Reminiscent,” Moulton Advertiser (22 December 1908), p. 1, col. 5-6 (1)

Or, Subtitled: Irish Linen, Thirst for Red Liquor, and a Loyalist Grandfather

Now to the last of the children of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore, their son David Dinsmore Lindsey (after which I’ll turn to Dennis, their oldest son): Mark and Mary Jane’s last child was named for Mary Jane’s father and, like his brothers Burke and Wesley, was called by his middle name. As we found when I did a series of postings about David Dinsmore previously, David was an Ulster Scots immigrant who arrived with wife Margaret in Charleston, South Carolina, on 10 December 1767. The couple sailed from Belfast aboard The Earl of Donegal, and immediately after their arrival in South Carolina, claimed land under the Bounty Act in what was then Craven County (and by 1769, Ninety-Six District) and would later become Spartanburg County. The Earl of Donegal’s passenger list states that David was aged 17 in 1767. (I’ve provided links to the six postings in my series about David Dinsmore at the end of this posting.) Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: David Dinsmore Lindsey (1815 – 1873)”

The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) (4)

Morgan County, Alabama, Chancery Court Minutes, Bk. 1843-1855, p. 530
Suit of William and Nancy Lindsey Morris re: estate of Mark Lindsey, Morgan County, Alabama, Chancery Court Minutes, Bk. 1843-1855, p. 530

Or, Subtitled: “Mark Was a Methodist, but Loved a Dram”

Mark Lindsey’s Death and Estate Records

As I’ve noted previously, Mark Lindsey is buried in a family cemetery that was established on the farm of his son Dennis at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, following Dennis’s death in 1836. Mark’s tombstone states that he died 10 April 1847, aged 74. I also noted that the tombstone clearly dates from the period of Mark’s death and that Mark’s widow Mary Jane Dinsmore Lindsey likely provided the information recorded on the stone. Mary Jane died 10 March 1853 and is buried beside her husband. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) (4)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)

Mendelsohn The Lost

This will be my final posting in this series about Patrick Ryan (1846-1893) and his Civil War pension file. If you’re just discovering this blog, you may want to read the whole series of which this is the final piece. What I want to do now is provide some footnotes to  previous postings in the series. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (6)

Lawrence C. Byrd, Death Record, Union Service Packet
Lawrence Cherry Byrd, Civil War Service Record, NARA, M399, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Arkansas, Personal Papers; RG 94, Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Volunteer Organizations During the American Civil War, compiled 1890 – 1912, documenting the period 1861 – 1866.

As I ended my last posting about the Civil War pension claims filed by Patrick Ryan and his widow Delilah Rinehart Ryan in Grant County, Arkansas, I mentioned that one of the threads tying together the network of families represented in these combined pension files is that men from several of these families were Union soldiers during the war —in a state that seceded from the Union, from families living in the central and southern part of Arkansas where Confederate sentiment was stronger than it was in the northern half of the state. As we’ve seen, Pat Ryan’s first wife Rosanna Hill Spann was the widow of John H. Spann, who served in the 3rd Arkansas Cavalry along with Pat Ryan, as did John Spann’s brother James Jasper Spann, who enlisted in Little Rock in Co. K of this Union unit on the same day that Pat Ryan did, 8 November 1863. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (6)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (5)

Ryan, Patrick Union Pension File, Elizabeth Hill Affidavit
Affidavit of Elizabeth Hill, Civil War Pension Files of Patrick Ryan and Widow Delilah Rinehart Ryan (Invalid’s Pension, South Division, #1107789, Widow’s Pension #586121)

I’d like to begin winding down my series of postings about the Civil War pension files of Patrick Ryan and his wife Delilah Rinehart Ryan of Grant County, Arkansas, by tying up some loose ends I’ve left dangling in my four previous postings about these genealogically rich documents. As I do so, I’m fully aware that most of you don’t share my intense interest in the people mentioned in these files. How could you, when they aren’t your relatives and the connections of your kin? Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (5)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (4)

John H. Spann Union Provost Maarshal's Papers
NARA, M345, RG 109, Union Provost Marshals’ File of Papers Relating to Individual Civilians, 1861–1867, Arkansas file 726.

You obtain an unexpected new treasure trove chock full of genealogical goodies, as I did last year when, at long last, I thought to look for a Union service record for my grandmother’s uncle Pat Ryan and discovered he and his widow Delilah Rinehart Ryan had filed pension applications for his Civil War service. You obtain a new genealogical treasure trove, and you have an entirely new genealogical problem on your hands. You’ve suddenly gone from knowing too little about one of your family members of the past to that dreaded internet scourge, TMI. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (4)”