The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Dennis Lindsey (1793-1855/1860) (2)

CV_Patent_0127-238
15 May 1828 federal patent to Lindsay Allen, Franklin County, Alabama, Bureau of Land Management, General Land Office, Credit Volume Patent Bk. 127, p. 238

Or, Subtitled: Entering the Thicket of Allen-Woodruff Kinship Ties

Dennis Lindsey Family Settles in Franklin County, Alabama

As I noted in my last posting, after Dennis Lindsey (1793-1855/1860) sold Benjamin Goodman 100 acres on Ferguson’s Creek in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, on 22 February 1827, he dropped out of Spartanburg County records. It seems likely to me that the land he sold was his homeplace and that he moved his family to Franklin County, Alabama, not long after this land sale. In an article on the Lindsey family of Franklin County in Olden Times of Colbert and Franklin Counties in Alabama, Beatrice Russell states that the Lindsey family came to Franklin County, Alabama, from South Carolina and settled in the Crooked Oak-Frankfort area of the county.[1] This is in the north-central part of Franklin County, near the Colbert County line. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Dennis Lindsey (1793-1855/1860) (2)”

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795) (3)

Lindsey, Dennis 96 Dist. Plat Bks D, (North of Saluda), p. 182
Dennis Lindsey, February 1796 plat, Ninety-Six District, South Carolina, Plat Bk. D (North of Saluda), p. 182

Or, Subtitled: Land Deeded Before Being Granted

From 1790 to Dennis’s Death by 12 January 1795

In this next posting chronicling the life of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795), son of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806), I’d like to focus on records pertaining to a 248-acre tract of land between Jamey’s and Ferguson’s Creeks of the Tyger River granted to Dennis in November 1792. This is the only piece of land I find Dennis owning at any point in his life — and it appears that, even before he acquired the grant, he had signed half of the land to George Bruton by a bond he made before the grant was made. Before we look at records about that piece of land, I want to remind you of some points I made in my previous posting, which are important to keep in mind as we look at records regarding Dennis’ land grant of 248 acres: Continue reading “The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795) (3)”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Do DNA Work and Prepare for Surprises

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Or, Subtitled: How DNA Findings Can Upend All You Thought You Knew about Your Family

I want to return now to a topic I introduced in May 2018 (and here): the descent of my Lindsey family, classified as group 10 in the International Lindsay Surname Project, from an Irish indentured servant named Dennis Linchey, who arrived in Richmond County, Virginia, by 1 June 1718 aboard the ship The Expectation, and was indentured in August 1718 to Francis Suttle. This first posting in this new series will talk about how DNA findings can completely upend everything you think you know about your family history, and point you in fruitful new directions for researching your actual family history. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Do DNA Work and Prepare for Surprises”

David Dinsmore, Ulster-Scots Loyalist in South Carolina and Nova Scotia Exile: Every Life Worth a Novel (6)

Dinsmore, David, SC Royal Grants 17, p. 257
South Carolina Royal Grants 17, #257.

If David Dinsmore did return to his wife Margaret and their five children after he sold his Nova Scotia land grant in January 1787, then it seems strange that Margaret is listed as head of her household in Spartanburg Co., South Carolina, on the 1790 federal census. A 19 November 1799 deed of Jane McClurkin to Paul Castelberry, both of Spartanburg County, also says that the land bordered on the east on Margaret Dunmore’s land, indicating that  by 1799, Margaret was regarded as the owner of the land her husband had acquired in South Carolina (Spartanburg DB G, pp. 159-161). Continue reading “David Dinsmore, Ulster-Scots Loyalist in South Carolina and Nova Scotia Exile: Every Life Worth a Novel (6)”

David Dinsmore, Ulster-Scots Loyalist in South Carolina and Nova Scotia Exile: Every Life Worth a Novel (1)

Dinsmore, David, Signature to Loyalist Affidavit
David Dunsmore’s signature to his affidavit as he filed his Loyalist land clam in Halifax, Nova Scota, 19 April 1786 — see Alexander Fraser, Second Report of the Bureau of Archives (Toronto, 1904), pp. 171-2 (#100). The claim was filed again on 19 July the same year.

Psychologist Erving Polster thinks every person’s life is worth a novel.[1]  For those of us curious to learn about our family history, Polster’s insight accounts at least in part for what compels us to keep learning.  Beyond the bare facts we accumulate in the pursuit of information about our ancestors lie stories that can in some cases be downright fascinating, with their alternate hues of joy and tragedy, ill fate and astonishing good fortune.  It’s often the stories themselves, in fact, that keep us going when the trails of facts begin to taper off. Continue reading “David Dinsmore, Ulster-Scots Loyalist in South Carolina and Nova Scotia Exile: Every Life Worth a Novel (1)”