Children of Thomas Brooks (1775 – 1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock: Jane and Charles Brooks

Bond of Charles Brooks and John Stewart, 24 January 1823, for Charles’s marriage to Deniah Cornelius, see Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1820, available digitally at FamilySearch

Or, Subtitled: Wherein I Confess That I’ve Made a Whopper of a Mistake, about Which I Need to Tell Readers of This Blog

I need to start this posting with a confession. I make mistakes. I know that will shock you profoundly[!]. In working on this posting, I discovered I have made a colossal one, one that reverberates through previous postings about my Brooks family. Finding that I have gone wrong about one key piece of information will now require me to backtrack through previous postings and correct multiple erroneous statements based on one big wrong turn.

Children of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and Wife Margaret: Margaret Brooks (1772 – 1857) and Husband Joseph Day (2)

History of Daviess County, Kentucky, Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages, and Townships, etc. (Chicago: Inter-State, 1883), p. 535

Or, Subtitled: A Family Clearly Illustrating the Genetic Tendencies to Twins in Brooks Lines

This posting is a continuation of a previous discussion of Margaret Brooks (1772-1857), daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Beaumont/Beamon) Brooks of Frederick and Wythe Counties, Virginia. As the article to which the link points tells you, around 1790, Margaret married Joseph Day (1768-1855), son of Joseph and Catherine Yarnall Day of Frederick and Botetourt Counties, Virginia. The previous posting focuses on the family of Joseph and Margaret Brooks Day up to 1804, when they moved from Botetourt County to Kentucky. This posting begins the chronicle of their lives with the move to Kentucky.

Children of James Brooks (1772-1835) and Wife Nancy Isbell: Clarissa E. Brooks (1818-1895), Alpha Caroline Brooks (1821-1890), and Samuel F. Brooks (1821-1846)

S.W. Barbee, “Old Lawrence Reminscent,” Moulton Advertiser (13 October 1908), p. 1, col. 4-5.

Or, Subtitled: “He draws near the crater of a volcano who lays violent hands on the Golden Rule”

With this posting, I’m resuming my chronicle of the children of James Brooks (1772-1835) and Nancy Isbell of Wayne County, Kentucky, Warren County, Tennessee, and Lawrence County, Alabama. In previous postings, I’ve chronicled the lives of their first two children, Godfrey Isbell and Thomas R. Brooks, then of their children Hannah Isbell, Margaret C., and James Irwin Brooks, and most recently of their son Johnson H. Brooks (and here). This now brings us to James and Nancy’s seventh child, their daughter Clarissa E. Brooks.  

Children of James Brooks (1772 – 1835) and Wife Nancy Isbell: Johnson H. Brooks (1815-1875)

S.W. Barbee, “Old Lawrence Reminiscent,” Moulton Advertiser (5 January 1909), p. 1, col. 3-4, transcribed by George A. O’Reilly, The History of E. James Brooks Family of Lawrence County, Alabama (1500 Trinity Road, Huntsville, Alabama 35802-2779; Oreilly0103@gmail.com). pp. 203-4

Or, Subtitled: More Affrays! — “His bellicose disposition led him into many a brawl with others, one of which cost him very dearly, since by it he lost an eye”

This posting is a continuation of two previous postings (here and here) discussing the children of James Brooks (1772-1835) and Nancy Isbell of Wayne County, Kentucky, Warren County, Tennessee, and Lawrence County, Alabama. The previous postings have discussed their children Godfrey Isbell Brooks, Thomas R. Brooks, Hannah Isbell Brooks, Margaret C. Brooks, and James Irwin Brooks. The next child of James Brooks and Nancy Isbell was:

Children of James Brooks (1772 – 1835) and Wife Nancy Isbell: Godfrey Isbell Brooks (1804-1826) and Thomas R. Brooks (1807-1880)

Moulton Advertiser (29 July 1880), p. 3, col. 1

Or, Subtitled: Affrays Aplenty

The names and birthdates of the children of James Brooks and Nancy Isbell are recorded in the family bible that passed to their son James Irwin Brooks (or, as I have suggested previously, it’s possible the bible actually belonged to James Irwin Brooks and he transcribed the information found in his parents’ bible into his own bible). Information about this bible is found in the two postings I’ve just linked and also here. Digital images of the transcript of the bible register published by Memory Aldridge Lester after she saw the original bible in June 1951 at the house of its owner, Nettie Raymond Brooks Young of Moulton, Alabama, are in the first posting linked above.

Thomas Brooks (1775-1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock (1774-1837): Alabama Years, 1836-1838

Original will (holographic, page 1) of Thomas Brooks of Morgan County, Alabama,, 2 October 1838, in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County Archives

Or, Subtitled: The Mystery of an Estate Selling Land to Which the Decedent Does Not Have Title

With this posting, I’ll provide information about the final phase of the lives of Thomas Brooks and wife Sarah Whitlock, after they moved in November 1836 from Wayne County, Kentucky, to Morgan County, Alabama, to join their adult children who had settled in adjoining Lawrence County, where Thomas’s brother James had died in 1835and Wayne County neighbors including Rev. Elliott Jones.  As I state at the end of the previous posting, because both Thomas and Sarah died not very long after they made their final move to Alabama, and doctors’ receipts in Thomas’s estate file indicate that medications like laudanum and morphine were prescribed for what appear to have been painful illnesses, I suspect that both were already sick at the time of their move, perhaps both with a lingering, debilitating illness such as cancer.

Children of Alexander Cobb Lindsey (1858-1947), Son of Mark Jefferson Lindsey and Mary Ann Harrison, and Wife Mary Ann Green

Children of Alexander Cobb Lindsey and Mary Ann Green at 1953 family reunion: front, l-r — Sam, Robert, Ed, Veta; back, l-r — Dennis, Clarence, Bloomer, Emma, Emmitt, Camilla

Or, Subtitled: “The fourth generation was represented, and there were 87 present”

As the previous posting, to which this posting is a footnote, indicates, the 1910 federal census states that Alexander Cobb Lindsey and Mary Ann Green had thirteen children,[1] but the birth and death register of their family bible, of which the posting I’ve just linked provides pictures, lists the names and birthdates of only twelve children.[2] The birth entries for all children except the last child of the couple, Emmitt, are in the handwriting of Alex C. Lindsey. No family records that I have seen provide the name of a thirteenth child.

The children of Alex C. and Mollie Green Lindsey are as follows:

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) and Mary Ann Harrison — Son Alexander Cobb Lindsey (1858-1947)

Alexander Cobb Lindsey and wife Mary Ann (Mollie) Green Lindsey, 1930s, Coushatta, Louisiana; photo in possession of Marilyn Lindsey Cope

Or, Subtitled:A Man of Service to Humanity in Red River Parish, Louisiana,” “Don Quixote Attacking a Spinning Windmill

Alexander Cobb Lindsey, the seventh child of Mark Jefferson Lindsey and Mary Ann Harrison, was born 10 March 1858 in Union Parish, Louisiana, and died 22 January 1947 at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana.[1] His tombstone in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery at Coushatta, Red River Parish, gives his name as “Dr. A.L. Lindsey,” as does his obituary in the Shreveport Times newspaper on 23 January 1947.[2] The tombstone, which was erected by his children for both Alex Lindsey and wife Mary Ann Green Lindsey following his death, incorrectly gives his date of death as 6 February 1947.[3]

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) and Mary Ann Harrison — Son Benjamin Dennis Lindsey (1856-1938)

A photo of Benjamin Dennis Lindsey at the time he was elected sheriff of Bexar County, Texas, in 1908; the original apparently hangs in the county courthouse, and is reproduced in Robert W. Stephens, Texas Ranger Sketches (Dallas, 1972), p. 84

Or, Subtitled: “Adventure Seeking Benjamin Dennis Lindsey,” “By Any Man’s Gauging a Gentleman’s Gentleman”

Benjamin Dennis Lindsey, the fourth son (and fifth child) of Mark Jefferson Lindsey and Mary Ann Harrison, was born 21 January 1856 in Union Parish, Louisiana. He died 2 May 1938 in San Antonio, Bexar County, Texas.[1] His biography by Clarence Wharton in Texas Under Many Flags states that his parents were Mark J. and Mary Ann Harrison Lindsey, the father a native of Lawrence County, Alabama, and the mother of Talladega, Alabama.[2] According to the biography, the Lindsey family came early to the South from England,[3] and Mark J. Lindsey was a planter in Alabama, who moved to Louisiana and assisted widows and orphans during the Civil War. Wharton states that Mark J. Lindsey died in Red River Parish in 1876 (1878 is correct) and Mary Ann Harrison Lindsey in 1875 (1877 is correct).  

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) and Mary Ann Harrison — Sons Carry Samuel, Charles Henry, and Mark Jefferson

Charles Henry Lindsey, daughter Mattie Elizabeth Boles, her son Shelton Boles and his daughter Nelda, 1948; photo uploaded by Paula Duchesne to her Raulston family tree at Ancestry

Or, Subtitled: Bobby the Ill-Tempered Chihuahua and Aunt Roxie Who Loved Him

Carry Samuel Lindsey (1858-1935)

Carry Samuel Lindsey was born 10 March 1858 in Union Parish, Louisiana, and died 9 October 1935 at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. Carry’s death certificate gives the full date of death, but records his birthdate only as 1858, stating erroneously that he was born in Coushatta, Louisiana, though his family had not moved to Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish by the time of his birth. His tombstone in Old Armistead Chapel cemetery, Coushatta, Red River Parish, Louisiana, erected some years following his death, has his full date of birth, and gives his year of death as 1933.