Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan (2)

Strachan, Rachel Monk, 17 Dec. 1818 Land Division, Estate File (2)
Division of land of Rachel Strachan Monk, Bertie County, North Carolina 17 December 1818, from her loose-papers estate file held by North Carolina Archives.

Strachan, Rachel Monk, 17 Dec. 1818 Land Division, Estate File (1)

I ended my previous posting about Nottingham Monk (1755/1760 – Feb. 1818) with an account of his Revolutionary War service and the documents this generated. I promised that I’d then tell you about his life from that point to his death, which occurred in Bertie County, North Carolina, between 28 January and 10 February 1818, and I’d then conclude my series about him with a posting examining some key documents from his extensive loose-papers estate file held by the North Carolina Archives. My previous posting was the first in a series building on an initial posting showing you that Strachan (or Strahon and Strawhorn) Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) of Martin County, North Carolina, and Hardin County, Tennessee, was the son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan. My intent in this series is to trace Strachan Monk’s ancestry, about which quite a bit of totally incorrect information has long been circulated.  Continue reading “Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan (2)”

Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan (1)

Nottingham Monk signatures: 13 July 1791, guardian account of George Kittrell’s orphans; 11 Feburary 1799, Noah Belote’s bond to administer estate of John Belote; 26 July 1795, allottment to Mary Kittrell of her dower in estate of George Kittrell.

So we’ve established that Strachan/Strahon/Strawhorn Monk (1778 – 1850/1860) was the son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan of Bertie County, North Carolina. In this posting, I’d like to move back a generation and begin sharing with you what I know about Strachan’s father Nottingham Monk. As we’ll see, the given name Nottingham is a surname used as a given name, just as with the name Strachan. Nottingham Monk’s grandparents were William Monk and Elizabeth Nottingham of Northampton County, Virginia. Continue reading “Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan (1)”

Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Life of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan

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William Anderson’s answer, as administrator of Nottingham Monk, to complaint of Amos Raynor,* Bertie County, North Carolina Court of Equity, 23 March 1825, listing heirs of Nottingham Monk; from loose-papers estate file of Nottingham Monk held by North Carolina Archives.

In the three-part series of postings I did recently about Daniel Cherry, his sister Talitha, and Talitha’s husband Strachan/Strahon/Strawhorn Monk of Martin County, North Carolina, and Tennessee, I noted that P.M. Harbert’s “Early History of Hardin County, Tennessee” has the following to say about Strachan (“Strawhorn”) Monk: Continue reading “Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Life of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan”

Dennis Linchey, Irish Indentured Servant to Richmond County, Virginia, 1718, and Dennis Lindsey, Who Dies in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1762: A Comparison

The following is a small chart I’ve compiled to map some of the pertinent facts we know about Dennis Linchey, who came to Richmond County, Virginia, in April 1718 as an indentured servant from Ireland, and Dennis Lindsey, who died in August 1762 in Granville County, North Carolina. Yesterday, I posted a more extended discussion about why I am confident that the two men are the very same men — that is, that Dennis Lindsey of Granville County, North Carolina, is the man who arrived in Richmond County, Virginia, in 1718 as an Irish indentured servant. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey, Irish Indentured Servant to Richmond County, Virginia, 1718, and Dennis Lindsey, Who Dies in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1762: A Comparison”

Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)

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Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Using unexpected DNA findings (which show that the group of Lindseys from whom I descend have the Irish Type III genetic signature pointing to southwestern Ireland as the family’s pre-American place of origin) in combination with traditional genealogical research methods, a group of us researching my Lindsey line have determined that it’s almost certain the line descends from a Dennis Linchey/Lynch who came to Richmond County, Virginia, in April 1718 as an Irish indentured servant. It has also come to be obvious to me and others that this Dennis tried to patent land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, after having served his term of indenture, and when he failed at this venture, went to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina, where he acquired land and died in August 1762.  Continue reading “Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)”

“In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (3)

Cherry, Elizabeth Marriage to Edward Byrd, Raleigh Register, 22 Feb 1822, p. 3, col. 5
Raleigh Register (Raleigh, North Carolina), 22 February 1822, p. 3, col. 5.

I began this series of postings about the 137-acre tract on the Tennessee River in Hardin County, Tennessee, that Daniel Cherry (1782-1843) loaned to his sister Talitha (1790-1860) and her husband Strachan Monk (1787-1858) in 1837 by telling you of my surprise when I read the original deed for this gift of land. Before reading the deed, I had understood that this land was an outright gift to Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk. Continue reading ““In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (3)”

“In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191 copy
Hardin County, Tennessee, Entry Bk. 1, Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191-2.

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, p192 copy

In my previous posting with this title, I told you I’d continue the story I began with it, which is about how, when I obtained a copy of the 1837 deed in which Daniel Cherry, a brother of my 3-great-grandmother Talitha Cherry Monk (1790-1860), loaned a piece of land to Talitha and her husband Strachan Monk (1787-abt. 1858), I then did a search of 19th-century land records in Hardin County, Tennessee. As I noted in my last posting, what I found when I did that search has provided me with illuminating information about an eastern North Carolina kinship network that settled on the Tennessee River in southwest Hardin County, Tennessee, soon after 1820. Continue reading ““In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)”