Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Mary Rice (1776/1778 – abt. 1825) and Husband Joshua Wilson (1769 – 1823)

Postlethwaite’s inn in 1837, from Frank C. Dunn, “Postlethwait’s Tavern,” The Louisville and Nashville Employes’ [sic] Magazine 18, 11 (November 1942), p. 19

Or, Subtitled: “At the head of the table, laid out with great neatness, plenty and variety, sat our well-dressed hostess, who did the honors with ease and propriety

This is the first of a two-part series that will document the life of George Rice and Elizabeth Brooks’s daughter Mary Rice and her husband Joshua Wilson. This posting focuses on the couple’s years in Virginia and then in Bardstown and Lexington, Kentucky. The next posting will focus on the final period of their lives in Louisville, Kentucky, and Corydon, Indiana. Several of the children of George and Elizabeth Brooks Rice shared an interest in inn- and tavern-keeping. As we saw in a previous posting, soon after they arrived in Kentucky from Virginia, Mary Rice Wilson’s sister Ruth and husband Micajah Roach purchased an inn in Bardstown from Joshua and Mary Wilson. And in a later posting, we’ll see that Mary and Ruth’s brother George also had a tavern in Winchester, Virginia. I call these establishments inns-cum-taverns because they were akin to the public houses of the British Isles in which locals could eat and drink, and also in which travelers could find lodging.

Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Elizabeth Rice (1770/1775 – bef. April 1808) and Husband William McCormick (1768? – 1819 or 1824)

History of Virginia, vol. 5: Virginia Biography, p. 317

Or, Subtitled: From Virginia Farms to Kentucky Ironworks

I’ve listed Elizabeth as the second of George and Elizabeth Brooks Rice’s children, though it’s possible that her sister Mary was older, and that Elizabeth and not Ruth was even the oldest of George Rice and Elizabeth Brooks and George Rice’s children. The previously cited August 1802 list of George and Elizabeth’s children found in the case file of the Augusta County, Virginia, chancery court case filed by Province McCormick against George’s executors places Elizabeth first in the list of children.[1] But the 15 April 1808 complaint of Bartholomew Smith in his chancery suit against George Rice’s heirs and children, also previously discussed, which seems to me to have a more correct list of George and Elizabeth’s children by order of birth, lists Ruth first, followed by Mary and then Elizabeth.[2]

Brief Addendum to Posting about Ruth Rice and Husband Micajah Roach: New Information about Their Son Griffin T. Roach (1797/8 – 1875)

Home of the Robert Poage family, Ashland, Kentucky — Robert was father of William Lindsey Pogue, who married 1) Ann McCormick and 2) Caroline Ann Roach; photo is from Tabitha Locascio and Emily Brammer, “Poage Family Home,” at the Clio website

Or, Subtitled: A Court File for a Divorce as a Source for Important Genealogical Information

In my last posting, which focused on Ruth Rice (1769-1852) and her husband Micajah Roach (1761-1805) and their family, I shared such information as I had when I wrote this posting about Micajah and Ruth’s son Griffin T. Roach. As that posting notes, Griffin was born in 1797-8 in Frederick County, Virginia, and is said to have died 25 March 1875 at Rinard, Wayne County, Illinois. On 18 September 1818 in Knox County, Indiana, he married Mary Wingate and by 1840, the couple can be found on the federal census in Greenup County, Kentucky, where a number of members of Ruth and Micajah’s family also lived at this time, and where Ruth died 27 March 1852. 

Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Ruth Rice (1769 – 1852) and Husband Micajah Roach (1761 – 1805)

Tennessee Gazette (8 June 1803), p. 2, col. 3

Or, Subtitled: At the “ſign of the Indian Queen” in Bairdſtown, Micajah Roach is “determined to exert himſelf to accommodate travelers in the beſt manner the country will afford, excellent ſtables, clover lotts, &c

When I promised in my last posting a follow-up piece about the children of George Rice and Elizabeth Brooks, I thought I’d have that article done in no time at all — and that the task would be simple. I thought wrong.