Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) and Mary Ann Harrison — Sons Michael, Thomas, and Jeremiah

Engraving entitled “Destruction of the Queen of the West by Union Gun-Boats,” Harper’s Weekly 7,335 (30 May 1863), p. 340, uploaded to Wikipedia by Son of the South website

Or, Subtitled: Captured Gunboats and Floating Cotton Bales

Mark Jefferson Lindsey and Mary Ann Harrison had the following children (all surname Lindsey): Michael Dorsey; Thomas Madison; Jeremiah J.J.; Emma C.; Benjamin Dennis; Carry Samuel; Alexander Cobb; Charles Henry; and Mark Jefferson.[1] In what follows, I’ll discuss the first three of these children, sons Michael, Thomas, and Jeremiah. In subsequent postings, I’ll discuss the other children of Mark and Mary Ann in “batches,” setting Alexander Cobb, my great-grandfather, and Benjamin Dennis aside for discussion in separate postings, since I have more information about those two children of Mark and Mary Ann than the others.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) — The Louisiana Years

Mark Jefferson Lindsey in 1870s; photo is reproduced in Henry C. Lindsey, The Mark Lindsey Heritage (Brownwood, Texas, 1982), p. 46; original in possession of John Ewan Kellogg, Coushatta, Louisiana, in 1980s

Or, Subtitled: The Lure of the New Cotton Frontier in Northwest Louisiana Prior to the War

In my last posting, I told you of a letter my uncle Henry C. Lindsey (Carlton to his family, but Henry professionally) sent me on 18 November 1980, in which he recounted what several elderly relatives he had just visited in Coushatta, Louisiana, told him about the move of Mark Jefferson Lindsey and wife Mary Ann Harrison to Louisiana in 1849 or 1850. These relatives told my uncle versions of stories I myself heard a number of times at the annual family reunion of descendants of Mark and Mary Ann in October each year in Red River Parish.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878)

Pen-and-ink drawing of Mark Jefferson Lindsey from “an old family bible,” reproduced in Henry C. Lindsey, The Mark Lindsey Heritage (Brownwood, Texas, 1982), p. 3

Or, Subtitled: Migration of Alabama Families to Northwest Louisiana, Late 1840s and Early 1850s

Establishing Mark’s Birthdate

In the bible of his sister Frances Rebecca Kellogg, Mark Jefferson Lindsey recorded his birthdate, stating that he was born “in the year 1820 Oct the 9,” son of D. and Jane Lindsey. Above the diary entry, Mark has written the date on which he made this record: “December the 4 1853.” We’re able to know that Mark himself wrote this entry since his handwriting matches that of other documents he wrote. In the signatures of Mark below, note the stylized J, for instance, with the loop running back through the top of it, and the stylized capital M. The first is from a 15 September 1838 deed of trust between Jacob H. Huffaker and John M. Davis in Oakville, Lawrence County, Alabama, for a debt Huffaker owed Davis, with Mark signing as trustee.[1] The second is Mark’s signature as he gave bond on 19 October 1839 for his marriage to Mary Ann Harrison in Lawrence County.[2] The birth record for Mark in his sister Frances Rebecca’s bible is, it’s easy to ascertain, written in the same hand — by Mark himself.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Dennis Edward Lindsey (1836-1863)

NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Mississippi, M269, RG 109

Or, Subtitled: “A Fine and Dashing Young Man” (Who Died Too Young)

Dennis Edward Lindsey, son of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks, was born in 1836 prior to his father’s death in Lawrence County, Alabama, on 28 August of that year. When his mother Jane petitioned for her dower share of Dennis’s estate in November 1836, her petition states that her son Dennis (who is not given a middle name in these estate documents) was an infant.[1] The 1850 federal census, which shows him living in the household of his widowed mother Jane at Oakville in Lawrence County, gives Dennis’s age as 14, placing his birth in 1836.[2]

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey Hunter (1834-1921)

William and Margaret Lindsey Hunter, abt. 1870, photo uploaded by Kelly Browne to Margaret’s Find a Grave memorial page, Liberty cemetery, Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana

Or, Subtitled: “Prominent as Planters, Merchants, Ministers of the Gospel”

Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey, daughter of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks, was born 14 January 1834 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama. This date of birth is found on her tombstone at Liberty Baptist cemetery, Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana.[1] Margaret’s son William Marshall Hunter pastored Liberty church for a number of years. It was founded by Reverend John Dupree, grandfather of Marshall’s wife Laura Jane Dupree.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Frances Rebecca Lindsey Kellogg (1831-1916) — Alabama-Mississippi Years

Bible of Frances Rebecca Lindsey and Samuel Hiram Kellogg, first page of birth entries

Or, Subtitled: Matching Signatures to Handwriting in Old Bible Entries

When I work to figure out certain pieces of information about the life of Frances Rebecca Lindsey and her husband Samuel Hiram Kellogg, I come up against a number of puzzles. I have never been able to solve these despite repeated attempts to do so. They include the question of when, where, and how Frances and Samuel met and the question of Samuel’s antecedents prior to his marriage to Frances Rebecca. 

I now have some answers to the two questions posed above. Please see this subsequent posting.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Martha Ann Lindsey Williams (1829-1914)

The Female School at old Richmond was under the control of Miss Martha Lindsey when I went there to school to Martin. Miss Martha was a remarkable woman in many respects. She was firm and determined, yet gentle and loving to her pupils. Strong of purpose, strong in the hearts of her pupils and strong in her hold upon her patrons; apt to teach and loving her profession, it goes without the saying that she made a success of the school, and turned out many young ladies who have been ornaments to society and helpful to the world.

W.L. Clayton, “Pen Pictures of the Olden Times,” Tupelo Journal (14 July 1905), p. 3, col. 3-4

Or, Subtitled: “Apt to Teach and Loving Her Profession”

We’ve met Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks’s daughter Martha Ann Lindsey, who was born 11  August 1829 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, in a previous posting.[1] That posting notes that by 1850, she had gone from Lawrence County, Alabama, to Itawamba County, Mississippi, where her older brother John Wesley Lindsey had settled in late 1839. The estate records of her father Dennis in Lawrence County suggest to me that Martha was still living at home at Oakville in Lawrence County when a final settlement of the estate was made in March 1846, with her brother-in-law James B. Speake acting as guardian of the estate’s minor heirs, including Martha. 

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mary Jane Lindsey (1826-1850) and Husband James Irwin Brooks

Marriage license and return from original records marriage file; recorded in Lawrence County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. B, p. 256

Or, Subtitled: A Wife Dying Too Soon, Leaving a Bereaved Husband and Two Little Boys

Mary Jane Lindsey was the seventh child (and second daughter) of Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks. Her older sister Sarah Brooks Lindsey had been named for Jane’s mother Sarah Whitlock Brooks. Mary Jane was named for her father’s mother Mary Jane Dinsmore Lindsey.

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Samuel Asbury Lindsey (1825/6 – 1865)

Samuel Asbury Lindsey, Mexican-American War discharge papers, photocopied in Henry C. Lindsey, The Mark Lindsey Heritage (Brownwood, Texas; 1982), p. 115

Or, Subtitled: “I Will Take Her in My Arms Back to Texas and Make a Fortune for Her”

Several sources provide information about Samuel’s date of birth. Those sources, unfortunately, conflict with each other. When he enrolled for service in the Mexican-American War on 6 March 1847 at Huntsville, Alabama, in Company H of the 13th Infantry, he gave his age as 23. This information is recorded in the U.S. Army Register of Enlistments, which also notes that he was a farmer born in Lawrence County, Alabama, was 6’1”, had light hair, gray eyes, and a fair complexion.[1]

Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Charles Washington Lindsey (1822/5 – 1847)

Engraving of National Bridge, Veracruz, Mexico, by George C. Furber from The twelve months volunteer; or, Journal of a private, in the Tennessee regiment of cavalry, in the campaign, in Mexico, 1846-7 (Cincinnati: J.A. & U.P. James, 1848)., online at website of Center for Greater Southwestern Studies, University of Texas, Arlington

Or, Subtitled: “Men Don’t Take Any More Notice of One Dying Than if It Was a Dog or a Cow

Charles Washington Lindsey, the fifth child of Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks, is named as a child of Dennis and Jane in his mother’s November 1836 petition for her dower share of the estate.[1] Jane’s petition states that William J. McCord had been named in November 1836 as guardian of the minor children of Dennis Lindsey. The list includes a son Charles W. He is listed between his brothers Thomas Madison Lindsey, who was born 9 October 1821, and Samuel Asbury Lindsey, who was born in 1825 or 1826. This places Charles’s birth between 1822-1825.