Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Cassandra, John, Nicy Malinda

Tombstone of Cassandra Lindsey Johnson, Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery, Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia; photo by John (Jack) Moon at her Find a Grave memorial page, which was created by Barry E. Smith

1. Cassandra Lindsey Johnson (1791-3 – 1853)

As the first of the two postings linked above states, it appears that Cassandra may have been the first-born child of William and Rachel Earnest Lindsey. Her tombstone in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery at Adairsville in Bartow County, Georgia, states that she died 6 January 1853 “aged about 60 years.”[1] This would place her birth around 1793 (in Spartanburg County, South Carolina). The 1850 federal census suggests a birthdate of around 1791 for Cassandra.[2] This document, which I’ll discuss in more detail below, gives her name as Cassander Johnson (her tombstone reads “Cassandra”), and shows her as wife of William Johnson. It indicates that she was 59 years old and born in South Carolina.

Biography of John Jefferson Johnson in Lucy Josephine Cunyus, History of Bartow County, Georgia (Formerly Cass) (Cartersville, Georgia: Tribune, 1933), pp. 71-2

Biographies of William C. Johnson and Cassandra Lindsey Johnson’s son John J. (Jefferson) Johnson in Memoirs of Georgia and History of Bartow County, Georgia both state that his parents were William C. Johnson and Cassandra Lindsey, who moved from South Carolina (Laurens County is implied) in 1845, settling at Poplar Springs near Adairsville in what was then Cass County but later became Bartow County.[3] John Jefferson Johnson (1826-1901) farmed with his father at Poplar Springs up to William C. Johnson’s death in 1866 and then bought a farm at Adairsville, where he spent his remaining years.

In the two previous postings linked at the head of this posting, the following pieces of information about William and Cassandra appear, with citations of the documents in which this information appears:

  • 5 May 1834: William C. Johnson gave bond with his brothers-in-law Isaac and Dennis Lindsey for administration of the estate of their grandfather Henry Earnest in Spartanburg County.
  • 5 June 1837: William C. Johnson gave bond with his brother-in-law William Anson Halbert (husband of Cassandra’s sister Rachel) for the administration of the estate of their wives’ grandmother Margaret Earnest in Spartanburg County.[4]
  • 26 February 1840: Cassandra received from her grandfather Henry Earnest’s estate an unnamed enslaved girl, livestock, and a bed and furniture. Note that this document allocating shares of Henry Earnest’s estate identifies Cassandra as wife of William Johnson. The document is signed by William Johnson, Isaac Lindsey, Henry Lindsey, Elizabeth Cooper (her mark), William Halbert, John Cooper, and John Lindsey, with John Allen and J.M. Bradley witnessing. 
  • 1 August 1846: the bill of complaint filed by Cassandra’s mother Rachel Earnest Lindsey in her lawsuit against her son-in-law William Anson Halbert states that William Johnson was planning to move from South Carolina at that date. Rachel alleged that after William Johnson gave bond with William Halbert to handle her inheritance from her father Henry Earnest, they both appropriated some of the property to themselves. Halbert then left the state, and Rachel says that Johnson was making plans to do the same, and she appealed to the court to restrain him from leaving and to subpoena him to give an account for his handling of her estate from her father.

Note that Rachel Earnest Lindsey’s allegation that her daughter Cassandra and husband William C. Johnson were preparing to move away from South Carolina in 1846 fits with what their son John J. Johnson told biographers in the two books previously cited. Both state that he and his father came from South Carolina to Georgia in 1845. Unless that date is off by a year, then it seems likely to me that William and Cassandra had begun making plans to move to Georgia and by 1845, had possibly bought property there, perhaps sending their son John to Georgia ahead of them to open their new farm. Further research in Cass/Bartow County, Georgia, records would clarify this point. I have not done that research. Cass, where the family settled when it left South Carolina, was renamed Bartow County in 1861.

Poplar Springs, where the Johnson family settled by 1845-6, appears to be no longer in existence. A Poplar Springs cemetery now in Adairsville commemorates its existence, and is not far from the Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery in which Cassandra is buried. Adairsville is about 60 miles northwest of Atlanta in the Oothcalooga Valley. This area had belonged to the Cherokees until Andrew Jackson removed them from their land and sent them on the Trail of Tears in 1838.[5]

As noted previously, the family of William C. and Cassandra Johnson is enumerated on the 1850 federal census in Cass County.[6] The census shows William Johnson as 65, a farmer with property worth $3000, born in South Carolina. Wife Cassander is 59, also born in South Carolina. In the household are children Narcissa, 33, John, 26, Elvira, 21, Margaret, 19, Irina, 18, William, 17, Perry, 15, and Hosea, 16, all born in South Carolina. William Johnson also appears on the 1850 federal slave schedule in Cass County’s district 12 owning 12 enslaved persons.[7] Enumerated on the same page of the 1850 census with William C. Johnson’s family is the household of a Benjamin Roebuck and wife Mary who, I suspect, had moved from Spartanburg County, South Carolina, to Cass County, Georgia.

The 1860 federal census again enumerates William C. Johnson’s family in Cass County, but by this point, Cassandra had died — as noted previously, on 6 January 1853 — and William had remarried.[8] His second wife is said to have been Elizabeth A. Glenn, the widow of William Anderson Dawson when William Johnson married her between 1853 and 1860.[9] In 1860, only William and Cassandra’s youngest son Hosea remained at home with his father and step-mother and her son William Dawson. The 1860 federal slave schedule lists William C. Johnson owning four enslaved persons, with his son Hosea (Hosie) enumerated next to him holding two enslaved persons.[10]

The two previously cited biographies of William and Cassandra’s son John state that William C. Johnson died in 1866 at Poplar Springs in what had become Bartow County. I have not found a burial place for him. These biographies also state that William C. Johnson was the son of a Randolph Johnson who moved from Laurens District, South Carolina, to Duck River in Maury County, Tennessee, where he died.[11]

The children of William C. Johnson and Cassandra Lindsey are as follows (all surname Johnson):

1. Narcissa (Nicey) Johnson was born 8 June 1816 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 6 February 1856 at Poplar Springs in Cass County, Georgia. She is buried in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery at Adairsville in Bartow County.

2. Isaac Johnson was born about 1820 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died after 1860, probably in Bartow County, Georgia. Around 1847 in Cass County, Georgia, he married Ann, whose surname hasn’t been discovered.

3. Cynthia Johnson was born about 1822 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died after 1870, probably in Johnson County, Arkansas. About 1848 in Cass County, Georgia, she married Zachariah Gray.

4. John Jefferson Johnson was born 14 October 1826 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 11 November 1901 at Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia. In 1856 in Cass County, Georgia, he married Mary Elizabeth Barton, daughter of William T. Barton.

5. Elvira Johnson was born about 11 March 1829 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 6 December 1856 in Cass County, Georgia. Elvira’s tombstone in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery has been mistranscribed as a tombstone erected in memory of a Claire Johnson. Though the stone is now weathered and somewhat eroded, a close look at photographs of it shows that the name on the stone is Elvira and not Claire. The stone also appears to give Elvira’s death date as 6 December 1836. Yet we know from the 1850 federal census (see above) that she was living in 1850, and the birth year of 1829 implied by this census entry matches the birth year of Elvira on this tombstone, so the year of death on the tombstone is obviously incorrect, and is more likely 1856 than 1836. Elvira does not appear on the 1860 federal census. Note, too, that the Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery was not yet in existence in 1836, nor did the Johnson family even more to Georgia until 1845-6. I want to express sincere gratitude to astute reader John Blythe — see his comment below — who has provided invaluable assistance to me in sorting out this Elvira/Claire confusion.

6. Margaret Frances Johnson was born 12 February 1831 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 18 August 1889 in San Saba, San Saba County, Texas. On 23 February 1851 in Cass County, Georgia, she married Isaac C. Teague, son of Benjamin Teague and Esther Elizabeth Sadler. Margaret is buried in San Saba cemetery in San Saba, San Saba County, Texas.

7. Arrena Johnson was born 12 May 1832 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 2 April 1899 at Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia. On 9 September 1851 in Cass County, Georgia, she married William S. Murphy, son of John Murphy and Frances Stanton. Arrena is buried in Hayes cemetery at Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia

8. William M. (Wiley) Johnson was born about 1833 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 23 February 1890 in Gordon County, Georgia. He married 1) Lucretia Dodd, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Dodd (29 May 1851, Cass County, Georgia); 2) Martha E. Bailey, daughter of Azariah Porter Bailey and Jane M. Gaston (about 1855, Cass County, Georgia); 3) Elgia Gray (23 December 1868, Bartow or Gordon County, Georgia).

9. Perry Johnson was born 8 July 1835 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died 23 November 1909 at Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia. In 1858 in Cass County, Georgia, he married Nancy Sherley, daughter of Smith Sherley. Both Perry and Nancy are buried in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery at Adairsville.

10. Hosea Johnson was born in November 1836 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died in 1921, probably in Gordon County, Georgia.

A Cassandra Johnson whose husband is Elijah Johnson appears in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, records at the same time that William C. Johnson and wife Cassandra are enumerated there. She is likely a Cassandra Johnson aged 50 who is found on the 1870 federal census at Reidville, Glenn Springs post office, in Spartanburg County.[12]

2.(?)  John Lindsey

As the two previous postings about the family of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest linked at the head of this posting explain, the couple appears to have had a son named John. Evidence for this is found in the 26 February 1840 document in the loose-papers estate file of Henry Earnest, which states that a number of grandchildren of Henry Earnest — specifically identified as his grandchildren — were being allotted shares of his estate in advance of their full inheritance.

That document lists a John Lindsey as a grandson of Henry Earnest being allotted an advance on his inheritance. John Lindsey signs the document along with other heirs named in it. This is likely the same John Lindsey who bought an enslaved person named Myer at the estate sale of Henry Earnest on 5 November 1835.

But as the two postings linked at the head of this posting also note, finding specific information about this child of William and Rachel proves to be a challenge. Unless he’s a John Lindsey listed on the 1820 federal census in Spartanburg County (this possibility is discussed in the first of the two postings linked at the start of this posting), then he does not seem to appear as a head of a household in Spartanburg County on federal censuses from 1820 to 1850. If he is the John listed on the 1820 census in Spartanburg County, then he was born between 1776 and 1794, and seems to have been married in 1820. To be a child of William and Rachel, he’d have to have been born after 1790-1, when the couple evidently married.

The first of the postings linked at the start of this one also proposes that William and Rachel’s son John may well be the John Lindsey who witnessed their 20 March 1817 deed to Spencer Bobo for land that adjoined John Lindsey and several others. If the John Lindsey mentioned in and witnessing this deed was William and Rachel’s son, then he was of age by 1817, and this would seem to place his date of birth by or before 1799. The two postings linked at the start of this posting also state that the son of William and Rachel named John has gotten confused with a John Lindsey born around 1795, who was son of Elisha and Susan Lindsey, from a Lindsey family unrelated to the family of William Lindsey. This Lindsey family lived north of the Pacolet River in northeast Spartanburg County, while William Lindsey and his relatives lived in the southern end of the county near the Enoree River.

We know John Lindsey was alive on 26 February 1840, per the document allotting shares of Henry Earnest’s estate to his grandchildren. I do not find him on the 1850 census, and that makes me suspect this son of William and Rachel died between 1840 and 1850. He is also not mentioned in the lawsuits his mother filed in 1835 and 1846. He is in many ways a mystery to me — and I’m not sure where to place him among William and Rachel’s children. It would seem he might be close in age to Cassandra, but that’s a guess based on the sparse information I have. As I also note in the postings linked above, the task of figuring out the life of William and Rachel’s son John is not made any easier, either, by the fact that there are five separate John Lindseys representing three entirely distinct Lindsey families living in Spartanburg County in the late 1700s and 1800s.

Bible register (?) of John C. Cooper and wife Nicy Malinda Lindsey, photocopy sent to me in March 2010 by William Weldon Cooper of Corpus Christi, Texas, without information about its source

3. Nicy Malinda Lindsey Cooper

Nicy Malinda Lindsey was born 28 March 1793 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and died in 1845 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. This birthdate is from what appears to be a bible register. In March 2010, William Weldon Cooper of Corpus Christi, Texas, sent me a photocopy of this document, which shows the birthdates of Nicy and her husband John C. Cooper and of their children, as well as the death dates of John and Nicy’s sons Emanuel and John. William W. Cooper did not indicate who owns the original document with this information, or whether it’s actually a bible register, as it appears to be.

Nicy’s tombstone in Cates cemetery, Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia, gives her dates of birth and death as 1793 and 1845.[13]

Here are the records I have for Nicy and her family:

On 16 July 1824, John Cooper sold to Hiram Jones, both of Spartanburg County, 111 acres on the waters of the Enoree, with Amos Cooper and Henry Turner witnessing the deed. John Cooper signed, and Nicy relinquished her dower interest in the land on 24 July.[14] The birthdate of their oldest child, a son Emanuel, suggests to me that the couple had married about 1814, probably in Spartanburg County. This deed suggests that they probably lived in the southern end of the county just north of the Enoree, as Nicy’s family did.

As the two postings linked at the head of this posting indicate, on 26 February 1840, when shares of Henry Earnest’s estate were advanced to a number of his grandchildren, Nicy and husband John C. Cooper received an unnamed enslaved girl, livestock, and a bed and furniture. John Cooper, named as Nicy’s husband, signed for her share of the estate.

As we also saw in the two previous postings linked at the start of this posting, in the mid-1840s, Nicy’s sister Cassandra and husband William C. Johnson and her brother-in-law William Anson Halbert moved from South Carolina, with the Johnsons going to Cass (later Bartow) County, Georgia, as noted above, and William A. Halbert going to Crawford County, Missouri. William A. Halbert’s wife Rachel Lindsey seems to have died in Laurens County, South Carolina, right before Halbert left the state. It appears that John C. and Nicy Lindsey Cooper left South Carolina in the same time frame in which these other family members did so, settling in Gwinnett County, Georgia. Like Bartow, Gwinnett is in north Georgia, several counties southeast of Bartow County. To me, it seems likely that part of what spurred the move of these families from South Carolina at this time is that they had received their inheritances from the estate of Henry Earnest.

By 1850, John C. and Nicy Lindsey Cooper had definitely moved their family to Georgia, since the family is enumerated on the 1850 federal census there. According to William W. Cooper, with whom I had a phone conversation about this family in March 2009, a Gwinnett County deed shows John C. Cooper and wife Nicy selling land that had belonged to them on the waters of the Enoree in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, with the deed stating that they were residing in Gwinnett County at the time they sold this land. I have not seen this deed and don’t have a date or deed book citation for it.  

I think the land John C. Cooper and wife Nicy Malinda sold on the Enoree in Spartanburg County might well have been 100 acres on the Enoree that John House of Pendleton District sold to John C. Cooper’s father Jacob Cooper of Laurens District on 6 April 1812. Jacob then resold this land to John Cooper on 3 November 1812, with William Fowler and Henry Earnest witnessing this deed (Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. N, pp. 232-3, pp. 204-5).

The 1850 federal census shows the family living in Cates district in Gwinnett County.[15] The census lists John C. Cooper as 50, a farmer who was born in South Carolina. Wife N. Malinda’s age is smudged and impossible to read; it even appears as if it has been stricken through on the original census. The census states that she, too, was born in South Carolina. In the household are children are R. Elvira, 15, Emily E., 13, and Thomas L., 10, all born in South Carolina.  Note that this confirms that the family moved to Georgia from South Carolina after 1840.  

John C. Cooper also appears on the 1850 federal slave schedule in Gwinnett County owning two enslaved persons in Solon district.[16] Enumerated next to him on the slave schedule is a David H. Alexander who is also on the same page on which the family of John C. Cooper is listed on the 1850 federal census. The census indicates that David was born in South Carolina about 1813. The name David Alexander is one that occurs in Spartanburg County records. I suspect this Alexander family may have come to Gwinnett County from Spartanburg County, South Carolina.

John C. Cooper is buried in Cates cemetery near Lawrenceville in Gwinnett County, along with his wife Nicy.[17] His tombstone apparently indicates that he died in 1858. The previously cited document giving birthdates for members of this family states that John was born 1 March 1799.

William Weldon Cooper, who is mentioned above, formerly had a homepage at the Family Tree Maker website, which I no longer find online. This site contained information about the family of John C. Cooper and Nicy Malinda Lindsey, and about John C. Cooper’s ancestry.[18] Sandie Manning Lambert’s “Manning, Massey, Altom, Averett, Johnson and Many More” family tree at Rootsweb’s World Connect project also has a page for this family.

A number of sources including William Weldon Cooper’s now-defunct page at Family Tree Maker state that John C. Cooper was a son of Jacob and Rachel Cooper of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and that Jacob was a son of William Cooper and Lydia Clark. These sources propose that Jacob Cooper moved from Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In my view, it is much more likely that the Cooper family to which John C. Cooper belongs came to Spartanburg County from Edgecombe County, North Carolina. 

The name Nicy/Nicey was often a nickname for Eunice in the past. In the case of Nicy Malinda Lindsey, I suspect it’s actually a nickname for Narcissa. As noted previously, Nicy’s sister Cassandra and her husband William C. Johnson named their oldest daughter Narcissa. She appears by that name on the 1850 federal census. But her tombstone in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery at Adairsville, Georgia, gives her name as Nicey, suggesting that she was a Narcissa who had the nickname Nicey. I think it’s likely she was named for her aunt Nicy Malinda Lindsey Cooper.

Why many family trees online give Nicy Lindsey Cooper’s name as Hannah Nicy Malinda Lindsey Cooper, I have no clue. No document I’ve ever seen shows her name as anything other than Nicy Malinda or Nicy. Transcribers of her name on the 1850 federal census often read the name as H. Malinda, but this is a misreading of N. Malinda. It certainly creates problems in genealogical research when people invent names out of thin air like this for folks in their family trees.

The children of John C. Cooper and Nicy Malinda Lindsey were as follows (all surname Cooper):

1. Emanuel Cooper was born 21 June 1815 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and died 30 November 1822 in Spartanburg County.

2. Parthenia Ann Cooper was born 24 March 1820 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and died 23 October 1902 at Rome, Floyd County, Georgia, where she’s buried in Myrtle Hill cemetery. On 24 August 1841 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, she married John P. Wood, son of John Wood and Elizabeth Cole.

3. John Cooper was born and died 30 November 1822 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina.

4. Sterling Thomas Cooper was born 5 May 1824 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and died 14 January 1890 in Pike County, Arkansas. On 24 September 1843 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, he married Nancy E. Hamilton, daughter of William Archibald Hamilton and Susannah Thompson. Both Sterling and Nancy are buried in Delight cemetery, Delight, Pike County, Arkansas.[19]  

5. Mary Louisa Cooper was born 27 October 1827 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. She married John Jefferson Bowen on 18 March 1849 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and the couple then moved between 1850-1860 to Pike County, Arkansas, along with Louisa’s brother Sterling. I have not been able to find a record of Louisa or her husband John after their enumeration on the 1860 federal census in Pike County, and think perhaps Louisa died there between 1860-1870.

6. Hannah Malinda Cooper was born 27 October 1829 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. She is not listed in her parents’ household on the 1850 federal census, and may have died prior to that date, perhaps in Spartanburg County.

7. Rachel Matilda Cooper was born 27 January 1832 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. On 18 February 1849 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, she married William Guffin, son of William Guffin and Sarah Ann Fell. William and Matilda had a number of children, with their last daughter, Mary Caroline, being born in Gwinnett County on 12 November 1857, but a number of family reports online state that Matilda’s husband William Guffin died in Comanche County, Texas, in 1856. I find no record of Matilda following the birth of her daughter Mary Caroline. There are a number of Guffins on the 1860 federal census in Gwinnett County, Georgia, but none matching Matilda and her four children by William Guffin.

8. Rosa Elvira Cooper was born 16 March 1834 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. On 9 July 1854 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, she married John Hutchins. I have not been able to find any record of this couple following their marriage — not on the 1860 federal census, nor on subsequent censuses.

9. Emily Caroline Cooper was born 30 November 1835 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The last certain record I have for her is her listing in her parents’ household in Gwinnett County, Georgia, on the 1850 federal census. Sandie Manning Lambert’s “Manning, Massey, Altom, Averett, Johnson and Many More” tree at Rootsweb’s World Connect project, linked above, says she married a John Elkins, without giving a date of marriage or a source — or any information about John Elkins. I find no Elkins families in Gwinnett County, Georgia, on the 1850 or 1860 federal census.

Ancestry’s hints for Emily — and bear in mind that Ancestry’s hints can often be wildly wrong and they offer no substantiation of the connections they make — suggest she’s the Emily, wife of Theophilus J. Simonton, buried with that spouse in Haynes Baptist cemetery at Loganville in Gwinnett County, Georgia. If this is correct information (and, again, Ancestry offers no proof of this connection), then she died 27 October 1888, according to her tombstone. It’s also worth noting that Theophilus Simonton’s spouse Emily/Emeley was 8 years his senior, according to the 1870 census.[20] The 1870 census also shows Emily Simonton born in Georgia, but Emily Caroline Cooper was born in Spartanburg County, South Carolina.

Photo of Thomas Landrum Cooper and wife Helen Elizabeth Beall Cooper from his Find a Grave memorial page, created by Linda Gilchrest, photo uploaded to the page by Find a Grave user LOL

10. Thomas Landrum Cooper was born 6 June 1838 in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, and died 30 May 1917 at Gorman in Eastland County, Texas. On 19 November 1867 in Clark County, Arkansas, he married Helen Elizabeth Beall, daughter of Asa Beverly Beall and Sarah Ann Dover Tuggle. Thomas and wife Helen are buried in Gorman cemetery, Gorman, Eastland County, Texas, with a tombstone giving their dates of birth and death.[21] As Thomas’s date and place of marriage suggest, he’s one of the siblings who went with his brother Sterling to Arkansas after 1850; Clark County, where Thomas married, is contiguous to Pike County, where Sterling lived. According to William Weldon Cooper’s Family Tree Maker site, noted above, Thomas and wife Helen followed her grandfather Dr. Ransom Tuggle from Arkansas to Comanche County, Texas, in 1872.

As a number of comments above indicate, there’s still much research to be done on this branch of the Spartanburg County Lindsey family, by those following branches that moved west from South Carolina. The information I offer above reflects limited research. In my next posting, I fill focus on the next batch of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest’s children following these initial three children.


[1] See Find a Grave memorial page of Cassandra Lindsey Johnson, Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery, Adairsville, Bartow County, Georgia, which was created by Barry E. Smith and has several photos of the tombstone by John (Jack) Moon.

[2] 1850 federal census, Cass County, Georgia, 12th division, p. 210 (1545/1556; 5 November).

[3] Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State’s Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People, vol. 1 (Atlanta: Southern Historical Association, 1895), pp. 299-300; and Lucy Josephine Cunyus, History of Bartow County, Georgia (Formerly Cass) (Cartersville, Georgia: Tribune, 1933), pp. 71-2.

[4] See Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose-papers estate files, estate of Margaret/Peggy Earnest, file #838.

[5] See Cunyus, History of Bartow County, Georgia, p. 71.

[6] See supra, n. 2.

[7] 1850 federal slave schedule, Cass County, Georgia, 12th district (unpaginated, 4 November).

[8] 1860 federal census, Cass County, Georgia, Cassville post office, p. 916 (dwelling and family 734; 19 July). 

[9] See Debbie Dietrich’s well-documented tree, “William Earl Barber,” at Ancestry. Elizabeth is buried at New Hope cemetery, Tecumseh, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, with a tombstone giving her dates of birth and death and stating she was the wife of William Johnson.

[10] 1860 federal slave schedule, Cass County, Georgia, Georgia militia district 856 (unpaginated; 18 July).

[11] See supra, n. 3.

[12] See Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. X, pp. 383-4; and Deed Bk. Z, pp. 440-1; and 1870 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 663.

[13] See her Find a Grave memorial page created by William Cooper. The page does not have a photo of the tombstone.

[14] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. T, p. 139.

[15] 1850 federal census, Gwinnett County, Georgia, Cates district, p. 183 (dwelling and family 775; 12 September).  

[16] 1850 federal slave schedule, Gwinnett County, Georgia, Solon district (unpaginated, 14 September).

[17] See his Find a Grave memorial page, created by William Cooper, which does not have a photograph of his tombstone.

[18] William W. Cooper also posted Information about the John C. Cooper family in an 11 October 1993 posting to the Cooper surname board at Ancestry, as well as in an 8 August 2000 posting at the Landrum surname board at Ancestry. On 11 October 1999, a Bill Cooper who may have been William W. Cooper posted the family to the Cooper thread at Ancestry. On 8 January 2000, Christy Glover also posted about this family to the Cooper board at Genforum.

[19] The Pike County, Arkansas, Archives and History Society has a well-documented family group sheet for this family submitted by David Kelley in 1999. According to this source, a biography of Sterling T. Cooper is found in Goodspeed’s Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Southern Arkansas (Goodspeed Publishing: Chicago, Nashville and St. Louis, 1890), p. 323. I have not been able to locate this biography, however.

[20] 1870 federal census, Gwinnett County, Georgia, Yellow River post office, p. 62A (dwelling 886, family 874; 11 August). A number of Cooper families are on this and the preceding page of the census, but are not members of the family of John C. and Nicy Malinda Lindsey Cooper.

[21] See Thomas Landrum Cooper’s Find a Grave memorial page, created by Linda Gilchrest. It has two photos of their shared tombstone, taken by Linda Gilchrest and Ken Jones, and a photo of Thomas and wife Helen uploaded by Find a Grave user LOL.

4 thoughts on “Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Cassandra, John, Nicy Malinda

  1. Quick note, before I get back to reading. “I suspect that a Claire Johnson buried in Oothcalooga Baptist cemetery at Adairsville is their daughter. Her tombstone shows that she was born the 11 March 1829 and died 6 December 1836.” It makes no sense to bury a child in a place a decade before you move there (nor to exhume and cart a body there).  Is Find-A-Grave your only information about this person?  I would consider that the year of death may be 1856, which would also change her age at death to 27.  If so, then she could be a maiden daughter or a daughter-in-law.  Perhaps the church historian may offer some details about this person. Hope all is well.  —  John

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    1. Thank you, John. That’s an excellent point. I’m embarrassed that I had not even thought about the fact that the 1836 date predates the family’s move to Georgia. In fact, I tend to think there probably was no Oothcalooga Baptist church and cemetery there in 1836, so the 1856 date would make even more sense for that reason. Since there’s no Claire listed as a daughter on the 1850 census in this household, I’d wonder if your thought that she could be a wife of a Johnson son might explain who she is. I so much appreciate this good feedback.

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