The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795) (2)

Woodruff, Thomas, Plat, 49, 127
December 1829 plat for Thomas Woodruff, for 863 acres, Spartanburg District, South Carolina, at site of contemporry Woodruff, South Carolina, South Carolina Plat Bk. 49, p. 127

Or, Subtitled: Plats and Churches with Shifting Names

From The Revolution to 1790: Land Records Situating  Dennis Lindsey and His Father

At the end of my previous posting, I told you that I’d then move on to discuss Dennis Lindsey’s life from the Revolution up to his death in 1795. As I began working on this posting, I saw, however, that the material I wanted to discuss here is so voluminous that I’ve now decided to cut my final postings about Dennis Lindsey’s life into several pieces. This next piece will focus on the period from the Revolution to 1790., and will show you how land records can be used to draw conclusions about where Dennis very likely lived up to the early 1790s, and about probable neighbors of his. Continue reading “The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795) (2)”

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795)

Lindsey Direct Line Mark to Wm. Dennis

Or, Subtitled: Documenting Lives with “Receets” and Tombstones

As I told you when I began my postings about William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806), son of Dennis Lindsey the immigrant, I have not found absolute proof that the William Lindsey who claimed land in 1768 on the Enoree River in what was later Spartanburg County, South Carolina, is the son William named in Dennis’ 1762 will in Granville County, North Carolina. I am persuaded, however, that these two Williams are the same person, and in the posting I have just linked, I provided you with my reasons for concluding this — compelling ones, it seems to me. Continue reading “The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)

Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 2
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)

Or, Subtitled: Land Grants and Payments for “Sarvis Done”

From the Revolution to the End of William Lindsey’s Life

We ended the previous posting, the second in our three-part series about the life of William Lindsey (abt. 1733 – abt. 1806), son of Dennis Lindsey the immigrant, noting that he acquired a 200-acre land grant on 9 November 1774 in what would become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The land was on a branch of the Tyger River that was almost certainly Jamey’s Creek, and a number of indicators suggest that this land may have been between that creek and Ferguson’s creek near what would eventually become Woodruff, South Carolina. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)

Spartanburg County 1825 Mills Atlas Map, Library of Congress
Robert Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina,” from Mills’ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1825); in the Library of Congress, call number G3913.S7 1820.M5, and digitized at the LOC website

Or, Subtitled: A Reminder of How Much We Can Learn from Migration Patterns and Land Records

Settling in South Carolina

By July 1768, William Lindsey was claiming land north of the Enoree River in what would later become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. For those interested in the currents of migration that brought early settlers to Spartanburg County, a good research aid is Frank Scott’s essay entitled “Migrations into Spartanburg Co.” at the SCGenweb site for Spartanburg County. As Scott notes, “After the French and Indian War, the Snow Campaign and a treaty that ceded the Cherokees’ claim to Spartanburg County, the area was finally opened to permanent settlement.” This brought an influx of settlers to the area between 1765-1770. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)

Lindsey, William, 1755 Granville Tax List
1755 Granville County, North Carolina, tax list, entries for Dennis and William Lindsey (original in North Carolina Archives; also on LDS US/Canadian microfilm 1758774, digitized by FamilySearch)

Or, Subtitled: The Challenges Encountered in Tracking “Wm. Lindsey Run Away”

And now to William Lindsey, the one child of Dennis Lindsey about whom I have substantial documentation — if, that is, I’m correct in identifying the William named as a son in Dennis’ will with a William Lindsey who had a precept on 5 July 1768 for 300 acres of land north of the Enoree River in South Carolina. We know from subsequent deeds that I’ll discuss later that this land was in Spartanburg County after the formation of that county, and that William Lindsey lived from the latter part of the 1760s north of the Enoree in southern Spartanburg County (but not on this 300 acres, which he sold in October 1772) until he disappeared from county records in the early 1800s. By 1806, his son William ceases to appear as Jr. in county records, and it seems to me that the father had died by then. I have been unable to locate estate records for the older William that would provide a date of death.

Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton

Ephraim Clanton Revolutionary Audit File (4)
South Carolina Revolutionary pay indent to Ephraim Clanton, Camden District, 7 July 1786, in South Carolina Revolutionary Audited Accounts, file 1252A

Or, Subtitled: Tracking 18th-Century Families from Surry County, Virginia, to Granville County, North Carolina, to Kershaw County, South Carolina 

I now want to introduce you to another child of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762) — his daughter Elizabeth, who married Ephraim Clanton. Though I’m really introducing you primarily to Ephraim, since I have found no information about Elizabeth beyond her listing as a daughter of Dennis Lindsey in his August 1762 will in Granville County, North Carolina…. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762

Sugar Jones' Militia List Eaton's Company 1754
“Granville County: Muster roll of Colonel William Eaton’s Regiment,” in “Troop Returns, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, RG 5864; digitized online at the state archives’ Digital Records Collection.

Or, Subtitled: Yows, Weathers, Working Tules, Indiorn Corn, and Shillings Starling

An assortment of deed, tax, and other records in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 1750s and 1760s provides an interesting snapshot of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life. In 1750, he appears twice on Granville County tax lists, once in Edward Jones’ district and once in John Brantley’s. As we’ve seen, it was from Jones that he first bought land on Isinglass Creek in Edgecombe (later Granville) County in 1744. And he sold that piece of land to John Brantley in November 1746, just after buying a tract on Sandy Creek. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762”