Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Cassandra, John, Nicy Malinda

Biography of John Jefferson Johnson, Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State’s Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People, vol. 1 (Atlanta: Southern Historical Association, 1895), pp. 299-300

Or, Subtitled: Tracking Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Lindseys to Georgia and Points West

This posting about the children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, is a continuation of a series of postings about this family. The first two postings in this series are here and here. Since William and Rachel had a large family of nine (known) children, I’ll post about the children of this family in several groups. This posting deals with their first three (?) children, Cassandra, John, and Nicy Malinda. I use a question mark here because, as explained below, I know so little about John that I’m not entirely sure where he fits in the order of children born to William and Rachel.

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) (2)

Coroner’s inquisition report for William Lindsey, Spartanburg County Quorum Court, “The State vs. the Dead Body of William Lindsey,” Coroner’s Inquisition, online at the CSI: Dixie site of the Center for Virtual History at University of Georgia (p. 1)

Or, Subtitled: “The Unkindest Cut of All — It Were Well It Had Slept in the Inventive Brain of the Aforesaid William Halbert

This posting, which examines the life of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, from 1830 up to William’s death in 1840 (and beyond that date, in the case of his wife Rachel) is the second in a series of postings about William and his family. The first posting in the series is here.

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) (1)

Or, Subtitled: Five John Lindseys Representing Three Distinct Families – Trials and Tribulations of Researching Lindseys in Spartanburg County, South Carollina, in 1700s/1800s

In a lengthy series of postings, I have followed the descendants of a Dennis Lindsey (about 1755 – 1795) who is the known son of a William Lindsey (about 1733 – about 1806) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As the posting I have just linked and postings about Dennis’s father William linked below state, we know that William and Dennis were father and son because records in the South Carolina Revolutionary audited account files of both men state that relationship.

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)

Spartanburg County 1825 Mills Atlas Map, Library of Congress
Robert Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina,” from Mills’ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1825); in the Library of Congress, call number G3913.S7 1820.M5, and digitized at the LOC website

Or, Subtitled: A Reminder of How Much We Can Learn from Migration Patterns and Land Records

Settling in South Carolina

By July 1768, William Lindsey was claiming land north of the Enoree River in what would later become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. For those interested in the currents of migration that brought early settlers to Spartanburg County, a good research aid is Frank Scott’s essay entitled “Migrations into Spartanburg Co.” at the SCGenweb site for Spartanburg County. As Scott notes, “After the French and Indian War, the Snow Campaign and a treaty that ceded the Cherokees’ claim to Spartanburg County, the area was finally opened to permanent settlement.” This brought an influx of settlers to the area between 1765-1770. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)”