Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Mark Jefferson Lindsey (1820-1878) and Mary Ann Harrison — Sons Michael, Thomas, and Jeremiah

Michael Dorsey Lindsey was born in 1842 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, and died on 26 December 1867 at Springville in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana. On 12 June 1864 at Springville in Natchitoches Parish, he married Sarah A. Myers, daughter of Thomas Massey Myers and Jane Catherine Owens.[2]

CSA service papers, Michael D. Lindsey, in NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Louisiana, 11th Louisiana Infantry Battalion, M230, RG 109; digitized at Family Search site

Michael Dorsey Lindsey’s Confederate service papers contain an enlistment document he signed (as M.D. Lindsey) when he enlisted on 6 May 1862 at Natchitoches, Louisiana, in Major J.D. Shelley’s Co. B of Louisiana’s 11th Battalion.[3] This document gives his name as Michael D. Lindsey and states that he was aged 20, and was 5′ 11¾” in height, with blue eyes, fair complexion, and light hair. The service packet gives Michael’s rank as sergeant, but a 7 March 1901 affidavit by T.H. Alexander supporting the pension application that Michael’s widow Sarah filed on 20 March 1901 for her husband’s CSA service states that Michael had the rank of first lieutenant by the time Alexander served with him.[4]

Confederate pension application of Sarah A. Lindsey, file 3503, held by Louisiana State Archives, Baton Rouge, and digitized at Family Search website

The 20 March 1901 pension application of Michael’s widow Sarah also states that Michael was made first lieutenant when his battalion was consolidated with the Crescent Regiment in 1863, becoming the Consolidated Crescent Regiment under General Mouton.[5] In addition, Confederate pension applications filed by Andrew Jackson Anderson and Samuel B. Harris, both of Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish, who served with Michael in Co. K of the Consolidated Crescent Regiment, both say that he was a lieutenant of the regiment.[6] The biography of Michael’s brother Benjamin Dennis Lindsey in Texas Under Many Flags also states that Michael was a first lieutenant of the Crescent Regiment.[7]

Michael’s CSA service papers state that he was captured on 14 April 1863 aboard the Queen of the West on either Bayou Teche or Grand Lake (both places are given at different points in the service packet). As the previous posting notes, the 1927 biography of Michael’s brother Benjamin states that Michael and his brother Thomas were aboard the Queen of the West, “a famous Confederate gun boat,” when it was blown up near New Orleans during the Civil War.[8]

“Important from the Teche: Destruction of the Queen of the West,” Times-Picayune (New Orleans) (15 April 1863), p.2, col. 3

A brief history of the Queen of the West is provided in a book entitled War Vessels of the U.S. Navy.[9] This source indicates that the Union gunboat Queen of the West was captured on 14 February 1863 by Confederate troops at Gordon’s Landing about fifteen miles above the mouth of the Black River on the Atchafalaya River. It operated after this as a CSA gunboat. On 14th April 1863, the Queen was attacked on the Atchafalaya by Union ships EstrellaCalhoun, and Arizona. The cotton she had aboard was set afire by a Union shell, and her burning wreck drifted down the river for several hours before the Queen grounded and exploded.

In an 18 August 1987 letter to me, Larry W. Broussard, who dives for sunken Civil War vessels[10] tells me that the Queen was disabled at the entrance of Grand Lake but drifted 2-3 miles before sinking. Philip Van Doren Stern’s The Confederate Navy: A Pictorial History provides further information about the history of the Queen of the West and its involvement in the Red River campaign of the Civil War.[11] Stern states that, after her capture by Confederate troops, the Queen was sent with two transports to Grand Lake where, about 2 A.M. on 14 April 1863, when she was entering the northern end of the lake, the Estrella and two other Union gunboats fired on her, with a shell from the Estrella setting fire to the cotton bulwarks on the Queen.  

Stern transcribes a letter written by Lieutenant-Commander Cooke of the Estrella on 15 April 1863 from Grand Lake. Cooke states that, after setting the Queen afire, the three Union ships picked up the crew of the burning steamer, who were clinging to cotton bales all around her.  According to Cooke, some 90 crew members were rescued with 20-30 being lost. These included Michael’s brother Thomas Madison Lindsey. A 14 April 1863 letter from Acting Third Assistant Engineer Baird of the Calhoun (also reproduced by Stern) says that 26 crew members of the Queen were scalded or burnt to death.

In her application for a pension due to her husband’s service, Michael’s widow Sarah states that her husband “became afflicted from exposure during service and died on 26 December 1867.” Sarah also states, “He seemed to be in bad health from exposure during his service in the war and sickened and died on 26 December 1867 near Coushatta La.” The exposure of which the application is speaking was the exposure that the men picked up by the Union gunboats suffered as they clung to cotton bales on Grand Lake as the Queen sank. The pension application of Samuel B. Harris cited above states that Samuel was clinging to a bale of cotton in the water for two hours before he was captured and taken as a prisoner to New Orleans.

Sarah’s pension application notes that friends of Michael when he was in service included J.R.G. Brittain, E.W. Hendricks, L.H. Alexander, and L.L. Robertson. Alexander’s letter supporting Sarah’s pension affidavit, which is cited above, states that he was a “galant [sic] Soldier [and] a good officer.” J.R.G. Brittain was James Robinson Graves Brittain, Sarah’s nephew, with whom she was living at the time she filed her pension application. The application notes that she had lived with the Brittain family near Ruston, Louisiana for many years.[12]

As noted above, Sarah’s pension application also states her maiden name, Sallie A. Myers, and indicates that she and Michael were married by Reverend John Dupree at Springville in Natchitoches Parish. On John Dupree, who was a pioneer Baptist minister from Georgia in northwest Louisiana who founded Liberty Baptist church in Natchitoches (later Red River Parish), a church pastored by Michael’s first cousin William Marshall Hunter, see this previous posting.

Because Michael D. Lindsey died young, I have few other records documenting his life. The Natchitoches Times newspaper states on 13 June 1866 that M.D. Lindsey had been elected an election commissioner for precinct 1 of ward 13, in Natchitoches Parish.[13] As noted in a previous posting, we know from the 1850 federal census listing him in the household of his parents in Bossier Parish that his middle name was Dorsey (the census spells the name phonetically as “Dawsey”). Michael’s mother Mary Ann Harrison was the daughter of Benjamin Harrison and Nancy Stewart, and Benjamin was son of Richard Harrison and Rachel Dorsey. The surname Dorsey passes down among their descendants as a given name. Mary Ann Harrison Lindsey had a brother Benjamin Dorsey Harrison. 

The given name Michael is not one I find commonly used in the Lindsey or Harrison family. The bible of Mark J. Lindsey’s grandfather Thomas Madison Brooks shows a son whose name appears to be Michael or Micajah born to Thomas and his wife Sarah Whitlock on 14 September 1814, but I have found no other record of this son. And I find no branch of this Brooks family naming sons Michael at any point.

The 1850 federal census shows Sarah A. Myers living in the household of parents Thomas Massey Myers and Jane Catherine Owens in Clarke County, Mississippi.[14] The census gives Sarah’s place of birth as Mississippi, though some later censuses would state that she was born in Arkansas. Thomas Massey Myers and Jane Catherine Owens had married 25 August 1822 in Lawrence County, Mississippi. By 1860, the family had moved to Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, where Thomas and Jane and their daughter Talitha were living near the Holley family, who had South Carolina roots as Thomas M. Myers did, and who lived near what in time became the community of Holley Springs in Red River Parish.[15] The 1870 federal census shows Sarah A. Myers’s brother Jeff Myers living at Coushatta Chute near the family of Mark J. and Mary Ann Harrison Lindsey.

Shreveport Times (8 February 1903), p. 2, col. 4

Shreveport Times newspaper on 8 February 1903 carried a death notice for Sarah in its Ruston section.[16] This states that Sallie Lindsay, an aged lady who had been afflicted with paralysis for a number of years, had died the preceding night.

Thomas Madison Lindsey was born in 1844 in Oakville, Lawrence County, Alabama, and died 14 April 1863 when federal fire sank the Queen of the West on Grand Lake in Louisiana. I’ve just recounted the circumstances of the sinking of the Queen as I discussed Thomas’s brother Michael Dorsey Lindsey, who was also aboard the gunboat when it was sunk. Family stories say that Thomas was last seen by his mates aboard the Queen clinging to a bale of cotton in the water after the boat caught fire. 

The biography of Thomas’s brother Benjamin Dennis Lindsey in Texas Under Many Flags notes his brother Thomas’s death when the Queen of the West sank, and gives his full name as Thomas Madison Lindsey.[17] As we’ve seen in a previous posting, the 1850 federal census lists Thomas among the children in his parents’ household in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, giving his initials as M.T. Lindsey. His Confederate service packet shows his name as Thomas L. Lindsay.[18]

CSA service packet of Thomas Madison Lindsey, NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Louisiana, 11th Louisiana Infantry Battalion, M230, RG 109, online at Fold3

The service papers show that Thomas enlisted at Natchitoches on 8 March 1863 in the same unit in which his older brother Michael was serving, Co. B of the 11th Louisiana Battalion. The packet closes with the statement, “Lost off Queen of the West April 14, 1863.” 

Thomas Madison Lindsey was named for his uncle Thomas Madison Lindsey, who was, in turn, named for his grandfather Thomas Madison Brooks. On this point, see this previous posting.

Tombstone of Jeremiah J. and Mary Elizabeth Latham Lindsey, Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery, Coushatta, Louisiana; photo by A Footstep in Time at Jeremiah’s Find a Grave memorial page

Jeremiah J.J. Lindsey was born 24 February 1850 in Claiborne or Bossier Parish, Louisiana, and died 27 February 1880 at Coushatta in Red River Parish, Louisiana. These dates of birth and death are inscribed on his tombstone in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery near Coushatta, which was evidently placed over his and wife Mollie’s graves by their children following her death in 1916. The tombstone gives Jeremiah’s name as Jerry Lindsey.

The 1850 federal census lists him in his parents’ household in Bossier Parish, Louisiana, giving him the name Jeremiah J. Lindsey and stating that he was a year old. On the 1860 federal census, his name appears as J.J.J. Lindsey, and he’s once again in the household of his parents in Bossier Parish. 

I’m fairly confident that Jeremiah is the J.M. Lindsey who married M.E. Campbell on 11 October 1868 in Natchitoches Parish, though the marriage record (of which I have not seen the original) gives his initials as J.M.[19] The tombstone of Jeremiah’s wife in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery gives her name as Mollie E. Latham and states that she was born 21 September 1847 and died 6 May 1916.. If the marriage record I’ve just cited belongs to Jeremiah and wife Mary Elizabeth Latham, as I think it does, then it appears she had been previously married to a Mr. Campbell. The Social Security application of Jeremiah and Mary Elizabeth’s son John Mark Lindsey confirms that his mother’s maiden name was Latham.[20] The death certificate of John Mark’s brother James Franklin Lindsey, who died 26 March 1928 in Red River Parish, shows his parents as Jerry Lindsey and Mary E. Lethrue [sic].[21]

An article by Dorris Adams Brogan in the volume Red River Parish: Our Heritage states that Mollie E. Latham was the daughter of Samuel and Agnes/Nancy Latham.[22] Sarah Cannon’s article about Jeremiah and Mary Elizabeth’s son William Allen Lindsey in the same book also states that William’s parents were Jeremiah Lindsey and Mollie Lathon [sic].[23]

Jeremiah Lindsey’s death in February 1880 is confirmed by the 1880 federal mortality schedule for Red River Parish, which shows that he died in February 1880 of dropsy, aged 29.[24] This source states that he was born in Louisiana of parents born in Alabama.

I have not been able to locate the family of Jeremiah and Mary Elizabeth Lindsey on the 1870 federal census. In 1880, Mollie is enumerated as a widow and head of the household in Red River Parish, with children J.F. (James Franklin), J.M. (John Mark), S.A. (Sarah Ann), W.A (William Allen), and S.E. (Celia/Sela Emma) in the household.[25] Mollie was pregnant when Jeremiah died and when the census was taken with daughter Jeraldine Elizabeth, who would be born in May.

The children of Jeremiah J.J. Lindsey and Mary Elizabeth Latham are as follows:[26]

1. James Franklin Lindsey was born 7 July 1871 in Red River Parish, died 26 March 1928, Red River Parish. On 22 January 1898 in Red River Parish, he married Bella L. Riley, daughter of Cullen W. Riley and Tamarann E. Norris.[27] Bella is buried at Mount Zion cemetery at Hall Summit in Red River Parish. I have not found James’s burial place.

2. John Mark Lindsey was born 7 July 1871 in Red River Parish, died 27 June 1948 at DeQuincy, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. In 1894 in Red River Parish, he married Iona Elizabeth Adams, daughter of Andrew Thomas Adams and Frances E. Pylant. John Mark and Iona are buried in Beauregard cemetery, DeRidder, Beauregard Parish, Louisiana.

3. Sarah A. Lindsey was born 8 March 1873 in Red River Parish, died 3 May 1925 at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. On 6 March 1898 in Red River Parish, she married Charles Franklin Bamburg, son of Marion Calhoun Bamburg and Susan Ann Tippet. Sarah and husband Charles are buried in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemeterynear Coushatta, Louisiana.

4. William Allen Lindsey was born 8 January 1876 in Red River Parish, died 31 May 1930 at Coushatta in Red River Parish.[28] On 21 February 1903 in Red River Parish, he married Mary Emma Veatch, daughter of Thomas Alexander Veatch and Margaret Attwood Wren.[29] Both are buried in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery near Coushatta, Louisiana.

5. Celia Emma Lindsey was born 15 June 1878 in Red River Parish, died 23 February 1936 at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. On 29 December 1895 in Red River Parish, she married Robert Hosea Bamburg, son of Robert Lindsey Bamburg and Sarah Elizabeth Pickett. Both are buried in Old Armistead Chapel Methodist cemetery near Coushatta.[30]

6. Jeraldine Elizabeth Lindsey was born 31 May 1880, Red River Parish, died 16 April 1933, Red River Parish. In 1905, she married Joseph Franklin Thomley, who is buried at Springville cemetery, Coushatta. I have not found a burial place for Jeraldine.[31]

[1] In a 29 August 1959 article from the newspaper Coushatta Citizen, of which I have a copy, Aaron Bloomer Lindsey, a son of Mark and Mary Ann’s son Alexander Cobb Lindsey, states that his grandfather was the father of twelve children. I have the names of only nine children. If A.B. Lindsey’s information is correct, it appears three children may have died early in life, and their names have not been passed on among descendants of Mark and Mary Ann.

[2] Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, Marriage Bk. 2, p. 121. The marriage record gives Sarah’s middle initial as N., but the pension application she filed on 20 March 1901 for her husband’s Confederate service gives her name as Sallie A. Lindsey (and she signs as Sallie A. Lindsey), and her maiden name as Sallie A. Myers: see Confederate pension application of Sarah A. Lindsey, file 3503, held by Louisiana State Archives, Baton Rouge, and digitized at Family Search website. Sarah filed the application 20 March 1901 in Lincoln Parish, Louisiana.

[3] NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Louisiana, 11th Louisiana Infantry Battalion, M230, RG 109; digitized at Family Search site.

[4] On the pension application, see supra, n. 2.

[5] According to Arthur W. Bergeron Jr., Guide to Louisiana Confederate Military Units 1861-1865 (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1989), the 11th Battalion was organized at Monroe on 14 May 1862 under Lieutenant Colonels Jacob D. Shelley and James H. Beard. On 3 November 1862, the unit was consolidated with the Crescent (24th) Regiment and the 12th Louisiana Battalion to form the Consolidated Crescent Regiment (pp. 164-5). 

[6] Confederate pension applications of Andrew Jackson Anderson and Samuel B. Harris, files 6871 and 192, held by Louisiana State Archives, Baton Rouge, and digitized at Family Search site, here and here. Jackson Anderson and Samuel Harris were brothers-in-law. I’ve studied their pension files because they fit into my family tree on the maternal side of my Lindsey line. My grandmother Vallie Snead Lindsey was the daughter of Henry Clay Snead and Lucy Frances Harris. Lucy’s parents were Simeon Lawrence Harris and Sarah Amanda Fitzallen Holland. Simeon was a brother of Samuel B. Harris, who married Amanda’s sister Cordelia Frances Holland. After Simeon Harris died, his widow Amanda married Jackson Anderson.

[7] Clarence R. Wharton, ed., Texas Under Many Flags, vol. 4 (Chicago: American Hist. Soc., 1930), p. 221.

[8] Ibid.

[9] U.S. Navy, War Vessels of the U.S. Navy, vol. 3 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Navy, 1912), p. 56.

[10] On this, see the Times-Picayune of New Orleans (12 July 1987), p. 2A6.

[11] Philip Van Doren Stern, The Confederate Navy: A Pictorial History (New York: Doubleday, 1962), pp. 132-9.

[12] See the 1880 census federal census for Lincoln Parish, Louisiana, ward 1, p. 84C (dwelling 390/471, ED 40, 22 June). This shows S.A. Lindsay, 52, born in Mississippi, living in the household of B.B. Brittain and wife M.A., and listed as B.B. Brittain’s brother-in-law. B.B. Brittain is Burrell Brewer Brittain, who married Sarah’s sister Martha Ann. The 1900 federal census for Lincoln Parish, Louisiana, ward 1, Ruston post office, p. 29 (dwelling 467, family 477, ED 54, 27 June), shows Sallie E. Lindsay, born January 1837 in Mississippi, as a widow living in the household of J.R. Britton, her nephew. This census states that Sarah was the mother of two children, both living. I have found no record of children she had with Michael Dorsey Lindsey.

[13] Semi-Weekly Natchitoches Times (13 June 1866), p. 2, col. 6,

[14] 1850 federal census, Clarke County, Mississippi, beat 4, p. 156A (dwelling and household 126; 13 August. 

[15] 1860 federal census, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, p. 564 (dwelling and family 1147; 8 October). 

[16] Shreveport Times (8 February 1903), p. 2, col. 4.

[17] See supra, n. 7.

[18] NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Louisiana, 11th Louisiana Infantry Battalion, M230, RG 109, online at Fold3.

[19] See Louisiana Secretary of State Office, Louisiana Marriage Indexonline at Ancestry as Louisiana Compiled Marriage Index, 1718-1925.

[20] See Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007, online at Ancestry as U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007.

[21] Louisiana death certificates, Red River Parish, vol. 9, certificate 3926. See also the death certificates of James’s sisters Sarah A. Lindsey Bamburg and Celia Emma (Selah) Bamburg, which both correctly name their mother as Mary E. Latham.

[22] Dorris L. Adams Brogan, “Samuel Moore Morgan and Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989), pp. 394-5.

[23] Sarah Cannon, “The Family of William Allen Lindsey, Sr.,” Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 316-9.

[24] 1880 mortality schedule, Red River Parish, Louisiana, p. 549.

[25] 1880 federal census, Red River Parish, Louisiana, ward 1, p. 62B (dwelling and family 16, ED 44, 5 June). The 1900 federal census for Red River Parish shows Mollie continuing to live in Red River Parish as head of her household, with children Sallie, Willie, and “Jose”: ward 1, p. 7 (dwelling 136, family 128, ED 82, no date given). In 1910, Mary Elizabeth was living with son William and his wife Emma and their children: ward 1 (dwelling and family 238, ED 95, 4 May).

[26] Mary Lou Lindsey Prothro lists the children of Jeremiah Lindsey and Mary Elizabeth Latham as John, Jim M., Willie A., Sallie, Selah, and Jerlene: Mary Lou Lindsey Prothro, “The Lindseys of Red River Parish,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 308.

[27] See Laura Jean Smith Duco, “Cullen W. Riley,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 437.

[28] See supra, n. 23.

[29] See T.J. Cox, “Thomas Alexander ‘Tom’ Veatch,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 520.

[30] An obituary of Celia by her husband, who was a Methodist minister, is in Journal of the Louisiana Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (1936), pp. 98-99.

[31] On this family, see Raymond Nails, “The Willie Nails Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 397-8.

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