Children of Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822) — Thomas Hollingsworth (1777 – 1836) and Wife Amelia Terrell

On 1 November 1808 in Franklin County, Georgia, Thomas Hollingsworth married Amelia Terrell, daughter of Simon Terrell and Sarah Thompson. Amelia is buried with Thomas in Fairview cemetery with a tombstone stating that she departed this life 4th October 1846 in the 60th year of her life.[2] The marriage date of Thomas Hollingsworth and Amelia Terrell is recorded in a diary kept by her brother William Terrell (1784-1827), according to Emma Dicken in her history of the Terrell family, which is available online at the website of the Terrell Society of America.[3]

To 1820, Franklin County, Georgia

As we’ve also seen previously, Thomas Hollingsworth was a signatory to a petition Franklin County, Georgia, citizens sent to Governor Telfair on 1 January 1793 alleging attacks by Cherokees on local citizens and asking for state help. Thomas signed along with his father and brother Jacob.[4]

The posting just linked in the paragraph above also notes that Thomas’s future father-and-mother-in-law Simon and Sarah Terrell sold Jacob Pennington land on 3 October 1795 in Franklin County, with the deed noting that the land was on Lewis or Coffey’s Creek of the middle fork of Broad River, and joined Thomas’s father Jacob Hollingsworth, Widow Bobo, Moses Terrell, and Simon Terrell.[5] Moses Terrell was Simon’s brother.

Also indicated in the posting linked two paragraphs above: on 8 May 1797, Thomas Hollingsworth signed another petition of citizens of Jackson and Franklin Counties to Georgia Governor Jared Irwin asking for a guard to protect these counties from the Cherokees. Also signing were his father and brothers Samuel and Jacob.[6]

In 1802, Thomas Hollingsworth appears on the Franklin County tax list in Captain John Martin’s company, along with his father and brothers Jacob and James. Thomas’s brother Samuel is listed on this tax list as deceased, and is taxed for 500 acres of land.[7]

When John Purcell sold Patrick Taylor 100 acres in Franklin County on 20 October 1803, Thomas Hollingsworth and his father Jacob witnessed the deed, and then later proved it in court.[8]   

As stated in this previous posting, in 1805, James Garner is taxed next to Jacob Hollingsworth and son Thomas in Franklin County for 600 acres. The tax listing states that Jacob was agent for Samuel Hollingsworth, deceased.[9]

According to Sadie Greening Sparks, Thomas Hollingsworth was appointed a justice of the peace for Franklin County on 28 March 1806.[10] Sparks does not cite a source for this information, and I do not find court minutes for this date in the county’s Court of Ordinary minute books. In Franklin County records from this date forward, however, there are many references to Thomas Hollingsworth, j.p. In a separate note, Sadie Sparks indicates that Thomas Hollingsworth was a j.p. for Franklin’s 211th district from 12 February 1813 to 23 January 1817.

As noted previously, on 7 November 1807, David Morgan and James Garner sold Jacob and Thomas Hollingsworth 200 acres on the middle fork of Broad River in Franklin County adjoining land formerly belonging to Thomas Payne, but now to Jacob Hollingsworth.[11] As the posting just linked also states, the Jacob Hollingsworth of this deed was Thomas’s father Jacob and not his brother with the same name. 

As also discussed in a previous posting, the 1808 tax list for Franklin County shows Thomas Hollingsworth again enumerated next to his father and brother Jacob, as well as to his brother-in-law James Garner. Thomas and his brother Jacob are listed as agents for their deceased brother Samuel Hollingsworth on this tax list.[12] On 7 March 1808, Thomas Hollingsworth was appointed the guardian of John Hollingsworth, minor son of his brother Samuel.[13]

As noted in a previous posting, on 2 September 1808, Samuel and Elizabeth Boling sold Thomas and Jacob Hollingsworth 250 acres on the south side of Leatherwood Creek in Franklin County.[14] The Jacob Hollingsworth of this deed is, I think, Jacob Jr. and not Jacob Sr. 

Also discussed in a previous posting: when James Garner and wife Sarah (Hollingsworth) conveyed to James Martin two tracts in Franklin County, Georgia, on 10 September 1808, the deed for the conveyance notes that the first tract, 78 acres on the middle fork of Broad River, joined Jacob (only the initial J. appears in the deed) and Thomas Hollingsworth, Boling, and Richard White.[15]

According to Sadie Greening Sparks, an 1810 Franklin County superior court case either mentions Thomas Hollingsworth or involves him in some way. She does not provide a citation of her source other than stating that this is a Franklin superior court case.[16]

Also from Sadie Greening Sparks’s valuable notes: On 1 November 1811 in Franklin County, Jacob Hollingsworth Jr., Thomas Hollingsworth, & James Martin, Esq., were appointed to appraise the estate of John Martin.[17] These two Martin men are, I suspect, closely related to Sarah Martin, wife of Thomas’s brother Jacob Hollingsworth Jr.

Thomas Hollingsworth’s name appears in a 5 March 1812 Franklin County deed of Richard White to Dudley Jones.[18] White sold Jones 82 acres on the middle fork of Broad River, out of a grant to Jacob Pennington. The deed notes that the tract adjoined Jacob and Thomas Hollingsworth, Jacob White, and James Martin.

Sadie Greening Sparks also states that Thomas Hollingsworth was a private in Eli Glover’s company of the Georgia Militia during the War of 1812, and appears on a muster roll for this company during the month of August 1813.[19] I have been unable to locate a War of 1812 service record for Thomas Hollingsworth, however, or information about this militia company during the War of 1812.

On 4 January 1814, Thomas and his brother Jacob Hollingsworth sold John Hollingsworth for $500 the 250 acres on Leatherwood Creek in Franklin County that they had bought on 2 September 1808 from Samuel and Elizabeth Boling (see above).[20] Witnesses to this deed were Henry Hollingsworth and Timothy Terrell. I believe the John Hollingsworth buying this land was Thomas and Jacob’s nephew John, son of Samuel Hollingsworth. Henry was another of Samuel’s sons.

As previously noted, the 15 May 1815 will of Thomas Hollingsworth’s father Jacob Hollingsworth names his son Thomas and leaves the following bequest to him:[21]

I will and bequeath to my four Sons Jacob[,] Thomas[,] James[,] and Benjamin Hollingsworth the balance of my Estate including the following Negroes by name Jack[,] Harvey[,] Harry[,] Lett[,] and Marien to be Equally divided between my four Sons aforesaid at my desease  

The will also made Thomas and his brother Benjamin co-executors of their father’s estate.

Also noted in the posting linked in the paragraph above: on 14 October 1817, Jacob Hollingsworth sold Alexander Shaw 335 acres on the middle fork of Broad River, along with 60 acres surveyed for Thomas Hollingsworth by John Martin and 10 acres joining both of the preceding tracts that Jacob had bought from James Martin Esq.[22] Jacob’s son Thomas witnessed this deed along with N. Dobson.  

As noted in another previous posting, on 13 May 1817, Thomas Hollingsworth and wife Amelia sold to Charles Sisson 250 acres on Grove Fork of Broad River in Franklin County, with the deed noting that the land had been granted to Peter B. Terrell, who sold it to Samuel Hollingsworth, deceased, and that his heirs John Haynes and John and Henry Hollingsworth conveyed the land to Thomas Hollingsworth.[23]

List of those paying fees for tavern licenses in Franklin County, Georgia, 1810-1825, Deed Bk. B, pp. 277-8

An interesting list n Franklin County Deed Book B of citizens of Franklin County who had had tavern licenses granted by the county’s inferior court from 1810-1825, and who had paid a fee for the license, shows Thomas Hollingsworth paying $5 for a tavern license in 1818.[24]

According to Sadie Greening Sparks, Franklin’s superior court records show Thomas Hollingsworth filing suit against Edmond Henley in 1819.[25] Because the microfilmed and digitized records for Franklin County available at the Family Search website do not include superior court records, I have been unable to obtain more information about this case.

1820 to 1825, Franklin County, Georgia

On 17 November 1820, the Georgia House passed a resolution appointing James Mitchell, John Stubbs, and Thomas Hollingsworth commissioners of Franklin County Academy, in addition to the already serving commissioners of the academy. This resolution was approved 5 December 1820 and the three commissioners were appointed. [26]

On 8 May 1821, Thomas Hollingsworth sold Henry Hardin 18 acres on the middle fork of Broad River in Franklin County, with Polly Sosbee (her mark) and Jos. Dunlap, j.p., witnessing. Thomas Hollingsworth signed the deed as Th. Hollingsworth, and it was recorded 14 May.[27]

Signature of Thomas Hollingsworth to 6 March 1822 affidavit on behalf of Benjamin J. Wofford, Franklin County, Georgia, Superior Court; original case file is now held by the Georgia Archives and is available digitally at the Archives’ Virtual Vault

As previously noted, after Thomas’s brother-in-law Benjamin Wofford filed suit on 27 November 1821 in Franklin County’s inferior court regarding property that he claimed Creek Indians had taken from him on 10 April 1797, for which he had not had recompense, Thomas Hollingsworth gave affidavit in Franklin’s superior court on 6 March 1822, verifying Benjamin’s claim.[28] Thomas’s affidavit states that immediately after the depredations occurred in 1797, chase was given, presumably with himself as part of the pursuing party. This affidavit has both Benjamin Wofford and Thomas Hollingsworth’s signatures. The posting linked at the start of this paragraph has a digital copy of Thomas’s affidavit with his signature — Th. Hollingsworth (and see the image above).

Move to Gwinnett County, Georgia, and Thomas’s Death

Sometime between 1821 and 1825, Thomas Hollingsworth moved his family from Franklin to Gwinnett County, Georgia, where he settled in the latter county’s seat, Lawrenceville. On 15 October 1825, Thomas and his brother-in-law William Terrell bought lot 207 in Lawrenceville.[29] Terrell bought lots in the brand-new and booming county town of Lawrenceville throughout 1825,[30] and settled on a large plantation of 870 acres a mile and half east of Lawrenceville.[31]

When William died in Lawrenceville on 24 December 1827, Thomas was co-executor of his will along with William’s wife Sarah Kendrick Terrell.[32] William and Sarah Terrell are buried in Lawrenceville’s Fairview Presbyterian cemetery along with Thomas and Amelia Hollingsworth. Both Thomas Hollingsworth and William Terrell’s widow Sarah are enumerated in Gwinnett County on the 1830 federal census, which shows Thomas with a male 50-59, a male 10-14, two males 5-9, and two males under 5, along with a female 40-49, a female 15-19, and a female 10-14.[33] The household also has six enslaved persons. In 1830, Sarah Terrell was operating the large plantation she had inherited from her husband outside Lawrenceville with the labor of 21 enslaved people.[34] Since William Terrell and Sarah Kendrick’s son Kenan Troup Terrell married Mariah Judith Maltbie, a member of my Winn family tree, I’ve collected information about this family in doing research on that branch of my family — and a granddaughter of William and Sarah, Sarah Elizabeth Simmons, married Samuel James Winn, a first cousin of Mariah Judith Maltbie.

On 15 March 1826, Thomas Hollingsworth of Gwinnett County sold Henry Keasler of Franklin for $1150 300 acres in Franklin on the middle fork of Broad River.[35] Thomas signed as Th. Hollingsworth, with witnesses Asa Ayers and Micajah Jones (his mark). Micajah Jones proved the deed 9 May 1827 and it was recorded on the 15th.

On 31 May 1836, the Milledgeville, Georgia, newspaper Southern Recorder, published the following notice about Thomas Hollingsworth’s death:[36]

Departed this life at his residence in Gwinnett county, on the 16th instant, Mr. THOMAS HOLLINGSWORTH, in the 59th year of his age, leaving behind him an amiable and affectionate wife and nine children and many endeared relations to mourn his irreparable loss.

The deceased was a very useful member of society, and high-minded and honorable man. He was proverbial for his honesty and integrity, and had, by a proper and upright course of conduct, endeared himself to all who knew him. He died of consumption, with which disease he had been afflicted many months before his death.

My notes about Thomas Hollingsworth contain a reference to a statement in the volume History of Franklin County, Georgia, that he was among those in Franklin County at an unspecified date requesting a passport from the Georgia governor pass through the Cherokee Nation.[37] I have not been able to locate this letter.

Notes on the Terrell Family

As I told you in a previous posting, Thomas Hollingsworth’s wife Amelia Terrell was the daughter of Simon Terrell (1755-1840) and Sarah Thompson. I have also indicated that the Terrell family of Franklin County, Georgia, had kinship connections with the Martin family into which Thomas Hollingsworth’s brother Jacob married. The posting I have just linked, which is about Jacob Hollingsworth and wife Sarah Martin, tells readers that I would be sharing more about those connections and the Terrell family when I posted about Thomas Hollingsworth and his wife Amelia Terrell. 

The Martin and Terrell families of Franklin County, Georgia, were already interrelated before they came to Georgia from North Carolina, where they lived in Chatham and Orange Counties (Chatham was formed from Orange in 1771) prior to moving to Georgia. Chatham borders Randolph County, where the Hollingsworth family lived up to 1788, on the east. The Hollingsworths, Martins, and Terrells were, in other words, living in close proximity to each other prior to the move of all these families to Franklin County, Georgia, before 1800.

According to Terrell researcher Emma Dicken, Amelia Terrell’s father Simon Terrell moved his family from Chatham County, North Carolina, to Franklin County, Georgia, between 1795 and 1800.[38] Simon was the son of Timothy Terrell (1705/1710 – February 1763), whose wife Mary is identified as Mary Martin in a manuscript written (in the 1830s, apparently) by a great-nephew of  Timothy Terrell, John Dabney Terrell (1773-1850), who lived among his Terrell relatives in Franklin County, Georgia, in the early 1800s and knew his cousin Simon Terrell personally.

John Dabney Terrell’s father Colonel Henry/Harry Terrell was a son of Timothy Terrell’s brother Joel Terrell. John represented Franklin County, Georgia, in the state legislature in 1811, then moved to Alabama, where he was a state senator from Marion County for a number of years.[39] John D. Terrell’s family papers have been preserved and are held by the Alabama Archives, and if I’m not mistaken, a memoir/memorandum book dating from 1839-1843 in this collection is the source of John’s genealogical notes about his Terrell ancestry.[40]

Emma Dicken cites John D. Terrell’s genealogical memoir, and she notes that the memoir states that John’s great-uncle Timothy Terrell married Mary Martin.[41] A transcript of the portion of John’s genealogical memoir discussing Timothy Terrell’s marriage to Mary Martin has been published in the journal Terrell Trails, and is available in digital form online at the website of the Terrell Society of America.[42]

John Dabney Terrell writes (with unflattering comments about the Martin family, it has to be said),

John [Terrell] lived in Granville County, North Carolina, as did Timothy in Chatham, than whom perhaps the whole world never produced a more finished highland devil. He was rich and honest, but drank freely, and all sorts of master devilment filled the measure of his utmost capacity, and his glory. He married a Martin, a kind of folks many of whom were tormented constantly with the blue devils, and many other sorts, and by this blood Tim cast poison into his descendants. Those Tugalve Terrells were his children and old Molly Phil Martin was another, drink, fight, lie, swear, and maybe some stole a little.

The “Molly Phil Martin” to whom John D. Terrell refers in the passage above was Mary, daughter of Timothy Terrell and Mary Martin, who married Philemon Martin, son of John and Rachel Martin.[43] Also to be noted as we discuss the Martin connections to the Terrell family of Chatham County, North Carolina, and Franklin County, Georgia: Amelia Martin, wife of Thomas Hollingsworth, had a sister Elizabeth who also married a John Martin. Dicken says that this John Martin was yet another member of the Chatham County, North Carolina, and Franklin County, Georgia, Martin family connected to the Terrells.[44]

So, to summarize the connections: Simon Terrell, father of Amelia Terrell Hollingsworth, was the son of Timothy Terrell and Mary Martin. Simon’s sister Mary married Philemon Martin, son of John and Rachel Martin. Simon and wife Sarah Thompson had a daughter Elizabeth who married a John Martin. Amelia’s husband Thomas Hollingsworth had a brother Jacob who married Sarah Martin. 

Then there’s this to note, too: Ruth Terrell, sister of Simon Terrell, married married Isaac Brooks (abt. 1727 – 1835), son of John and Susan Brooks, who moved from Virginia to Bladen County, North Carolina, about 1735.[45] John Brooks and Timothy Terrell served together as justices in Bladen County, North Carolina, in 1749-1751, and Isaac Brooks then represented Chatham County in the North Carolina legislature from 1771 to 1773. Dicken states that there is a tradition among the descendants of Isaac Brooks and Ruth Terrell that Isaac and Ruth were cousins.[46]

The name Brooks in this kinship network makes my ears perk up, of course, since the Hollingsworth family connected by marriage to the Terrells and Martins descends from Jacob Hollingsworth and Mary Brooks. If there is a kinship connection between Mary Brooks Hollingsworth and the John and Susan Brooks who were Isaac Brooks’s parents, I have been unable to discover it, however. As has been noted previously, I’ve been unable to discover the given name of Mary Brooks Hollingsworth’s father, her mother Mary’s maiden surname, or information about where this couple married and lived before the family begins appearing in records of Frederick County, Virginia, in the latter half of the 1700s.

Ida Brooks Kellam and Memory Aldridge Lester discuss the family of John and Susan Brooks in their volume entitled Brooks and Kindred Families.[47] They indicate that John Brooks was born in England about 1690 and came with wife Susan and their children to Virginia and then to North Carolina about 1735. “Bible records” place the family “along the James River” in Virginia before it moved to North Carolina. John settled in Bladen (later Cumberland) County initially, where he was a miller, justice of the county court, and vestryman of St. David’s parish. In 1755, he moved to Orange (later Chatham) County, where he held considerable property and died in 1766-7, his land being inherited by his youngest son Isaac. 

Kellam and Lester think that John and Susan Brooks had sons Thomas (born about 1710), Joab (born about 1712), John (born about 1715), Marcus (born about 1720), James (born about 1725), and Isaac (born about 1727), and possibly a daughter Martha who married Samuel Goodman. Samuel and Martha Goodman’s daughter Hannah married Micajah Terrell, a brother of Simon Terrell and Ruth Terrell Brooks.

The Children of Thomas Hollingsworth and Amelia Terrell

Finally, here’s the information I have about the children of Thomas Hollingsworth and Amelia Terrell. I haven’t found estate records for either Thomas or Amelia naming the nine children born to the couple before Thomas died in 1836, and because both Thomas and Amelia died in advance of the 1850 federal census, which began listing family members by name, there’s not a census record naming their nine children. What I’ve hobbled together is an incomplete list of their five sons and two daughters: it’s apparently missing two more daughters. Here’s the information I have:

Tombstone of Sarah Elizabeth Rees(e) Hollingsworth, Find a Grave memorial page of S.E. Hollingsworth, Madison Historic Cemeteries, Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, photo by Tim Savelle

1. Thomas D. Hollingsworth was born about 1810 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 4 February 1865 at Hilton Head, Beaufort County, South Carolina. On 10 August 1847 in Morgan County, Georgia, he married Sarah Elizabeth Rees(e). On 6 March 1863 at Beaulieu, Georgia, Thomas enlisted in a Confederate Army unit, Captain Hanleiter’s Light Artillery Company of Jo Thompson’s Artillery.[48] In November 1863, he was given the rank of sergeant in this unit. He was then captured by federal troops and hospitalized at Hilton Head for severe diarrhea on 3 February 1865, dying there the following day and being buried in the Beaufort National Cemetery at Beaufort, Beaufort County, South Carolina. 

In 1870, I find Thomas’s widow Sarah and their son Charles living in Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, next to Thomas’s brother William Terrell Hollingsworth, a physician in Madison.[49] The 1880 census shows William living in Sarah’s household in Madison.[50] Sarah Elizabeth Rees(e) Hollingsworth is buried in the historic cemetery of Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, with a marker stating that she was born 11 August 1829 and died 16 August 1893.[51] Her son Charles J. Hollingsworth is buried with her.

Tombstones of Hannah Hollingsworth Williams and husband Charles Lathrop Williams,  Find a Grave memorial page for Hannah B. Williams, Nacoochee Methodist cemetery, Nacoochee, White County, Georgia, photos by David J. Rutledge.

2. Hannah B. Hollingsworth was born 12 February 1812 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 6 May 1887 at Nacoochee in White County, Georgia. Hannah married her cousin Charles Lathrop Williams, son of Edward Williams and Mary Brown. As has been noted, Mary Brown was a daughter of Daniel Brown and Hannah Hollingsworth; Hannah was a sister of Hannah B. Hollingsworth Williams’s father Thomas Hollingsworth. I think Hannah B. Hollingsworth was named for her father’s sister Hannah Hollingsworth Brown. 

Charles Lathrop Williams and Hannah Hollingsworth Williams are buried in Nacoochee Methodist cemetery at Nacoochee, White County, Georgia. Both have markers stating their dates of birth and death.[52] Charles was a merchant and farmer in White County, Georgia. He was born 21 April 1811 in Burke County, North Carolina, and died 1 July 1886 at Nacoochee.

Tombstones of James H. Hollingsworth and Rebecca Ann Furlow Hollingsworth, Find a Grave memorial page for James Hollingsworth, Magnolia cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, photo by Sara Baker Partridge

3. James H. Hollingsworth was born 19 September 1813 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 31 May 1877 at Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia. On 22 December 1846 in Morgan County, Georgia, he married Rebecca Ann Furlow. James was a merchant at Madison in Morgan County and at Augusta, Georgia. James and Rebecca are buried in Magnolia cemetery, Augusta, Georgia, with tombstones stating their dates of birth and death.[53]

James enlisted on 31 December 1863 in Co. A of Augusta, Georgia’s, Local Troops regiment, CSA. He appears on muster rolls of the troop through June 1864.[54]

Tombstone of William Terrell Hollingsworth, Find a Grave memorial page for Dr. W.T. Hollingsworth, Madison Historic Cemeteries, Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, photo by Joe Stoner

4. William Terrell Hollingsworth was born in 1826 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and died 28 June 1893 at Madison in Morgan County, Georgia. He is buried in the historic cemetery of Madison, Georgia, with a tombstone giving his date of death, naming him as Dr. W.T. Hollingsworth, and stating that he was a surgeon in the Confederate Army.[55] As noted above, following the Civil War, William lived next to the widow of his brother Thomas, Sarah Rees Hollingsworth, in Madison, and then by 1880, had moved together with Sarah and was living in her household, while working as a doctor in Madison. I find no records indicating that William married.

William T. Hollingsworth enlisted in Co. D of Georgia’s 3rd Infantry, CSA, at Portsmouth, Virginia, on 22 June 1861.[56] He appears on muster rolls of the regiment as a surgeon through July 1862. His service packet contains a notice of his resignation as an officer on 9 August 1862. 

5. John Hollingsworth was born about 1828 in Gwinnett County, Georgia. The only information I’ve been able to discover about him is his listing on the 1850 federal census in the household of his brother James in Morgan County, Georgia, where his age is 22 and he’s a clerk, probably in James’s store (James is listed as a merchant).[57] I have not found a clear record of John after this. I wonder if he’s the John B. Hollingsworth buried in Magnolia cemetery in Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, with a tombstone stating that he was born in 1826 and died 21 August 1858.

Tombstone of Henry P. Hollingsworth, Find a Grave memorial page of Henry P. Hollingsworth, Nacoochee Methodist cemetery, Nacoochee, White County, Georgia, photo by Alice (Asuit) Owenby
16 June 1864 receipt of Henry P. Hollingsworth for payment by T.S. Metcalf, Depository of Augusta, Georgia, in NARA, Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-65, M346 RG 109, online at Fold 3

6. Henry P. Hollingsworth was born 5 June 1829 in Gwinnett County, Georgia, and died 5 March 1865 at Nacoochee in White County, Georgia, where he’s buried in the Nacoochee Methodist cemetery with a tombstone stating his dates of birth and death.[58] The 1850 federal census shows Henry living with his sister Hannah and her husband Charles L. Williams in Habersham County, Georgia.[59] Charles is listed as a merchant, as is Henry, whose name on the census also has the word “inmate” written next to it. White County was formed from Habersham in 1857; I think it’s likely that Charles Lathrop Williams and wife Hannah were living at Nacoochee by 1850, with Hannah’s younger brother Henry living with them.

A Confederate Citizens’ file that may belong to this Henry P. Hollingsworth shows H.P. Hollingsworth signing receipt on 16 June 1864 for interest on various treasury notes. The interest was paid to H.P. Hollingsworth by T.S. Metcalf, depository of Augusta, Georgia.[60] This file identifies H.P. Hollingsworth as Henry P. Hollingsworth.

Tombstone of Elizabeth Hollingsworth Day and Charles B. Day, See Find a Grave memorial page of Elizabeth Hollingsworth Day, Magnolia cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, photo by Stones in the South

7. Elizabeth Hollingsworth was born in 1836 at Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia, and died 30 June 1906 at Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia. On 17 July 1855 at Augusta, she married Charles B. Day. Both are buried in Magnolia cemetery at Augusta with tombstones stating their dates of birth and death.[61] Charles B. Day’s stone states that he was born in 1831 and died 3 November 1880. Charles was a corn merchant in Augusta. The 1850 federal census for Elizabeth’s older brother James, cited above, shows Elizabeth and her brother John both living with their older married brother James in that year. When their mother Amelia Terrell Hollingsworth died in 1846, it appears that the unmarried children still living at home with their mother up to her death were taken by older married siblings to live with those siblings up to the point of their marriage, with James taking John and Elizabeth and his sister Hannah taking Henry to live with her.


[1] The tombstone record is transcribed in Atlanta History Center, Cemetery Records for Atlanta and Vicinity, vol. 11: 1874-1932, p. 23; digitized at Ancestry as Fulton and Campbell Counties, Georgia, Cemetery Records, 1857-1933Thomas’s Find a Grave memorial page at Fairview Presbyterian cemetery, Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia, has photos of the stone uploaded to the page by Find a Grave user K. The page was created by Stacy Ann Williams.

[2] Atlanta History Center, Cemetery Records for Atlanta and Vicinity, vol. 11: 1874-1932, p. 23. A photo of the tombstone by Find a Grave user K is at Amelia’s Find a Grave memorial page in Fairview cemetery, created by Stacy Ann Williams.

[3] Emma Dicken, Terrell Genealogy (San Antonio: Naylor, 1987), p. 251. Dicken states (p. 250) that William Terrell’s “pocket book” has been preserved, but does not indicate its whereabouts as she wrote her text in 1987.

[4] [Petition] 1793 Jan. 1, Franklin County, [Georgia to] Edward Telfare [i.e., Telfair], Governor of Georgia, by Citizens of Franklin County, manuscript in the Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[5] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. L, pp. 69-70.

[6] Petition of the Frontier Inhabitants of Franklin and Jackson Counties, [Georgia], 1797 May 8, [to the] Governor [of Georgia, Jared] Irwin, manuscript in Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[7] See Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2), compiling tax records from Georgia counties, 1793-1892 in 140 volumes held by the Archives. Ancestry provides a search engine and digital copies of these tax records in the collection Georgia Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892. See also Sadie Greening Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia,” online at Loy Sparks’s website dedicated to the memory of Sadie Greening Sparks.

[8] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. DB PP, p. 45. See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.

[9] Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2).

[10] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.

[11] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. RR, pp. 36-7.

[12] Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2).

[13] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia, who states that the appointment was at a court session held on 7 March 1808. I do not find a listing for that session, however, in the county court of ordinary minutes. See also “A Franklin County, Georgia, Collection,” Hollingsworth Register 2,3 (September 1966), p. 104.

[14] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. RRR, pp. 31-2.

[15] Ibid., Deed Bk. T, p. 64.

[16] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk.TT, pp. 79-80.

[19] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.

[20] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. MMM, p. 82.

[21] The original will is in the loose-papers estate file of Jacob Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website. The will is also recorded in Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes, Bk. 1814-1823, p. 127.

[22] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. HH, pp. 178-9.

[23] Ibid., Bk. HH, p. 139.

[24] Ibid., Bk. B, pp. 277-8.

[25] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.

[26] Acts of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia Passed in Milledgeville at an Annual Session in November and December, 1820, vol. 1, p. 112, act 124, as cited in ibid. See also Franklin County Historical Society, History of Franklin County, Georgia (Roswell, Georgia: W.H. Wolfe, 1986), p. 184.

[27] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. B, p. 203.

[28] The file for this case is now held by the Georgia Archives and is available digitally at the Archives’ Virtual Vault.

[29] Joan H. Young, “William Terrell,” in Gwinnett County, Georgia, Families 1818-1968, ed. Alice Smyth McCabe (Atlanta: Cherokee, 1980), pp. 497-8.

[30] William D. Lindsey, William L. Russell, and Mary Ryan, A Family Practice: The Russell Doctors and the Evolving Business of Medicine, 1799-1989 (Fayetteville: Univ. of Arkansas Press, 2020), pp. 24-5.

[31] See Young, “William Terrell”; Cheryl Sauls, “Restoring Terrell Home,” Gwinnett Daily News (24 October 1982); and Kenneth H. Thomas Jr., “William Terrell Homeplace,” National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination (1982), online at the website of the National Park Service.

[32] Young, “William Terrell.”

[33] 1830 federal census, Gwinnett County, Georgia, p. 358.

[34] Ibid., p. 369. See also Frederick Ware Huff, Four Families: Winn, Thomas, Ware, Garrett of the Southern United States from 1600s to 1993 (priv. publ., Kennesaw, Georgia, 1993), p. 59. 

[35] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. BB, p. 90.

[36] Southern Recorder (Milledgeville, Georgia) (31 May 1836), p. 3, col. 5; see also Tad Evans, Milledgeville, Georgia, Newspaper Clippings (Southern Recorder), vol. 4: 1836-1838 (priv. publ., Savannah, Georgia, 1995), p. 48.

[37] Franklin County Historical Society, History of Franklin County, Georgia, p. 118

[38] Dicken, Terrell Genealogy, p. 248.

[39] Ibid., pp. 58, 115-6. See also Thomas McAdory Owen, History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, vol. 4 (Chicago: S.J. Clarke, 1921), p. 1656; and “John Dabney Terrell Sr.” at Wikipedia

[40] Alabama Archives, “John Dabney Terrell Family Papers, 1804-1921,” boxes PR 460, 469, 433. The finding aid to this collection that I have just linked states that John’s memoir/memorandum book contains genealogical information.

[41] Dicken, Terrell Genealogy, p. 233.

[42] “John Dabney Terrell, Sr.’s, Memoirs,” Terrell Trails 25,4 (Winter 2009), pp. 2342-6, online at website of Terrell Society of America. See also Sue Brooke, “John Dabney,” at the America the Great Melting Pot website.

[43] Dicken, Terrell Genealogy, p. 234.

[44] Ibid., p. 250.

[45] Ibid., p. 234.

[46] Ibid., p. 62.

[47] Ida Brooks Kellam and Memory Aldridge Lester, Brooks and Kindred Families (priv. publ., Wilmington?, North Carolina, 1950), pp. 10-12.

[48] See his CSA service papers in NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Georgia, M266 RG 109, online at the Fold3 site.

[49] 1870 federal census, Morgan County, Georgia, city of Madison, p. 365B (dwelling and family 326; 8 August). William T. Hollingsworth is household 325 on this page.

[50] 1880 federal census, Morgan County, Georgia, city of Madison, p. 267C (dwelling 209/family 239; 8-9 June). 

[51] See Find a Grave memorial page of S.E. Hollingsworth, Madison Historic Cemeteries, Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, created by Beth Ivie-Allen, with a tombstone photo by Tim Savelle.

[52] See Find a Grave memorial page for Hannah B. Williams, Nacoochee Methodist cemetery, Nacoochee, White County, Georgia, created by David J. Rutledge, with tombstone photos by David J. Rutledge.

[53] See Find a Grave memorial page for James Hollingsworth, Magnolia cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, created by Sara Baker Partridge, with a tombstone photo by Sara Baker Partridge.

[54] See NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Georgia, M266 RG 109, online at the Fold3 site.

[55] See Find a Grave memorial page for Dr. W.T. Hollingsworth, Madison Historic Cemeteries, Madison, Morgan County, Georgia, created by Beth Ivie-Allen with a tombstone photo by Joe Stoner.

[56] See NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Georgia, M266 RG 109, online at the Fold3 site.

[57] 1850 federal census, Morgan County, Georgia, dist. 62, p. 107A (dwelling 64/family 3; 14 August).

[58] See Find a Grave memorial page of Henry P. Hollingsworth, Nacoochee Methodist cemetery, Nacoochee, White County, Georgia, created by Reuben Glen Davis Sr. and maintained by Kimmie Kitchens/Courtney Gilstrap, with a tombstone photo by Alice (Asuit) Owenby.

[59] 1850 federal census, Habersham County, Georgia, dist. 5, p. 254A (dwelling and family 10; 30 September). 

[60] NARA, Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-65, M346 RG 109, online at Fold 3.

[61] See Find a Grave memorial page of Elizabeth Hollingsworth Day, created by Nala, Magnolia cemetery, Augusta, Richmond County, Georgia, with tombstone photo by Stones in the South.

3 thoughts on “Children of Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822) — Thomas Hollingsworth (1777 – 1836) and Wife Amelia Terrell

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