The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)

Lindsey, William, 1755 Granville Tax List
1755 Granville County, North Carolina, tax list, entries for Dennis and William Lindsey (original in North Carolina Archives; also on LDS US/Canadian microfilm 1758774, digitized by FamilySearch)

Or, Subtitled: The Challenges Encountered in Tracking “Wm. Lindsey Run Away”

And now to William Lindsey, the one child of Dennis Lindsey about whom I have substantial documentation — if, that is, I’m correct in identifying the William named as a son in Dennis’ will with a William Lindsey who had a precept on 5 July 1768 for 300 acres of land north of the Enoree River in South Carolina. We know from subsequent deeds that I’ll discuss later that this land was in Spartanburg County after the formation of that county, and that William Lindsey lived from the latter part of the 1760s north of the Enoree in southern Spartanburg County (but not on this 300 acres, which he sold in October 1772) until he disappeared from county records in the early 1800s. By 1806, his son William ceases to appear as Jr. in county records, and it seems to me that the father had died by then. I have been unable to locate estate records for the older William that would provide a date of death.

Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)

Orange County Survey, Fry
Survey map of Orange County, Virginia (1736?) in Joshua Fry, Memoir of Col. Joshua Fry (Richmond: Randolph & English, 1880), p. 26, showing fork of Rapidan River.

Or, Subtitled: Recurring Names, Plausible Patterns, and DNA Stumbling Blocks

This is the second half of a two-part set of postings. The first part, which is here, discussed the life of David Phillips in Richmond and Spotsylvania-Orange Counties, Virginia, prior to his move to North Carolina in 1742. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762

Sugar Jones' Militia List Eaton's Company 1754
“Granville County: Muster roll of Colonel William Eaton’s Regiment,” in “Troop Returns, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, RG 5864; digitized online at the state archives’ Digital Records Collection.

Or, Subtitled: Yows, Weathers, Working Tules, Indiorn Corn, and Shillings Starling

An assortment of deed, tax, and other records in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 1750s and 1760s provides an interesting snapshot of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life. In 1750, he appears twice on Granville County tax lists, once in Edward Jones’ district and once in John Brantley’s. As we’ve seen, it was from Jones that he first bought land on Isinglass Creek in Edgecombe (later Granville) County in 1744. And he sold that piece of land to John Brantley in November 1746, just after buying a tract on Sandy Creek. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750 — A Correction of Some Errors

 

Detail from Compleat map of North Carolina, 1770, showing Sandy Creek
A detail from John Collet, J. Bayly, and S. Hooper, A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey (London: S. Hooper, 1770), in the North Carolina Collection Gallery at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

At the end of my last posting, I told you I’d move on to an account of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life, ending with his death in Granville County, North Carolina, in August 1762. I now find that before I do that, I need to correct some mistakes I made in that previous posting. I’m going to point them out to you now, and I’ll also revise the posting itself to correct the errors, since others who may not see my corrections here may circulate or rely on that previous posting. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750 — A Correction of Some Errors”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750

Jones, Edward to Dennis Lindsey, Edgecombe 1744 (Halifax DB 5, 213)
Deed of Edward Jones to Denis Linsey, 3 February 1744, Edgecombe County, North Carolina) (Halifax County, North Carolina Deed Bk. 5, p. 213)

Or, Subtitled: The Importance of Knowing County Boundary Changes as You Study Land Records

To sum up some salient points of the previous posting about Dennis Linchey’s/Lindsey’s post-indenture life in Virginia (abt. 1725-1734/5): once he was freed from indenture, likely about 1725, he did what we’d expect a young man recently freed from servitude to do: Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750”

Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Using unexpected DNA findings (which show that the group of Lindseys from whom I descend have the Irish Type III genetic signature pointing to southwestern Ireland as the family’s pre-American place of origin) in combination with traditional genealogical research methods, a group of us researching my Lindsey line have determined that it’s almost certain the line descends from a Dennis Linchey/Lynch who came to Richmond County, Virginia, in April 1718 as an Irish indentured servant. It has also come to be obvious to me and others that this Dennis tried to patent land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, after having served his term of indenture, and when he failed at this venture, went to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina, where he acquired land and died in August 1762.  Continue reading “Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)”