Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Mark and Henry

6. Mark Lindsey

As was discussed in a previous posting, census reports offer a variety of possible years for the birth of William and Rachel Lindsey Earnest’s son Mark. The 1850 federal census shows him born in 1795, while the 1860 census has him born in 1810 and the 1870 census yields a birthdate of 1815.[1] In my view, a birthdate closer to 1795 is more likely for Mark, and he is likely one of the males aged 16-26 in his parents’ household on the 1820 federal census.[2]

Here’s what I know of the life of Mark Lindsey:

When Mark’s grandmother Margaret Earnest, along with his parents William and Rachel Earnest Lindsey, deeded some of the land of his grandfather Henry Earnest to several grandsons on 5 October 1835, Mark was among the grandsons receiving land from Henry Earnest’s estate. On that date, his grandmother and parents deeded to him and his brother Dennis for love and affection 500 acres on the north side of the Enoree.[3] The deed states that Margaret Earnest was living on this tract along with son-in-law William Lindsey and daughter Rachel. The land was bounded by Jesse Wofford (east), Brinkley Cliften (north), Thomas Garrett, Jonathan Cooper, Isaac Wofford, and Joseph Cooper. Isaac Moore and Joseph Cooper witnessed the deed.

On 22 September 1837, Mark and Dennis then deeded these 500 acres to their brother Isaac, with this deed noting that 300 of the 500 acres were from a grant to William Lindsey on 7 March 1769 (the clerk erroneously wrote 1869 here).[4] As has been noted previously, William Lindsey Sr. patented this tract in 1768 and received the grant for it in 1769, then sold the land, which passed through a number of hands before Henry Earnest acquired it — and the land then passed back into the hands of the Lindsey family through Mark, Dennis, and Isaac, grandsons of the William Lindsey who had received this land grant.

On the 1840 federal census, Mark Lindsey is listed as head of a household, with his widowed sister Elizabeth Lindsey Cooper living beside him, and his brother Henry enumerated on the same page.[5] Mark’s household consists of a male aged 20-29 and a female aged 70-79. This census entry would place Mark’s birth between 1811 and 1820. The older female is clearly Mark’s mother Rachel. William Lindsey had died by the time the 1840 census was takenAs noted previously, the 1850 federal census, in which Rachel is again listed in her son Mark’s household as “Richard” Lindsey, indicates that Rachel was born around 1775. The 1840 census listing suggests that Mark, his sister Elizabeth, and his brother Henry were living in the southern end of Spartanburg County near the Enoree. Other names on the same census page, including James McLain and members of the Westmoreland family, are people we’ve met in previous postings about this Lindsey family, who interacted with its members and lived in that part of the county.

As was discussed in detail in a previous posting (and also see here), Mark appears on the 1850 federal census (listed as Mark Linsay) with his sister-in-law Mary Pickrell Lindsey, wife of Isaac Lindsey, and their children living in his household.[6] Also in the household is a Richard Linsay, 75, who is, it’s clear to me, as I stated above, Mark’s widowed mother Rachel, mislabeled as Richard by the census taker. This census entry was made on 17 December. Mary and her children appear on the same census in Spartanburg County on 27 August with Mary heading her household.[7] Her husband Isaac had been committed to the South Carolina mental hospital in 1846 and is listed in that institution in Columbia on the 1850 federal census.[8]

As with the 1840 census, where Mark also had his widowed mother living in his household, in 1850, his sister Elizabeth and her children are living next door to Mark, with Elizabeth’s son Zadock Cooper heading that family.[9] On the page following the one listing Mark, once again, James McLain and members of the Westmoreland family are found, and on the page after that is found Nicholas Van Patten, who lived on the Enoree and for whom Van Patton Shoals on the Enoree is named.

The 1860 federal census shows Mark Lindsey (listed as Mark Linsey) living in the household of brother Henry Lindsey and Henry’s family in the southern division of Spartanburg County at Woodruff post office.[10] This census taker has given Mark’s occupation as farmer, and then crossed the word out, noting in the final column of the census that Mark is insane. On the noticeable pattern of mental disturbances in this family, see this preceding posting

In 1870, Mark is found again in Spartanburg County on the federal census — this time at Reidville, Glenn Springs post office, listed as Marcus Lindsey.[11] I discussed this census entry in the previous posting, noting that this census entry shows Mark as a farmer, aged 55, living in a household headed by Racheal Cooper, also enumerated as a farmer, aged 25, with a Landrum Bragg in the household. As the posting I have just linked indicates, though her birth year on this census is considerably at variance from the birthdate indicated for her on the 1850 federal census, I’m fairly certain this is Rachel, daughter of Elizabeth Lindsey Cooper, whom Mark’s loose-papers estate file in Spartanburg County shows the estate paying for care she provided for her uncle in the final part of his life, with Mark designated a “lunatic.”[12]

The previous posting to which I have just pointed notes that Landrum Bragg was son of Chaney Bragg and Mary Cooper of Spartanburg County. The 3 November 1824 will of George Devine in Spartanburg County names Chaney Bragg as a grandson without stating which one of Devine’s daughters had married a Bragg.[13]

It’s worth noting that Mary (Calvert?), widow of Dennis Lindsey (about 1755 – 1795) of Spartanburg County, an uncle of Mark Lindsey, in my view, had by her second husband William Lindsey Allen a daughter Susan who married Thomas Bragg. John Newport Bragg, a son of Thomas and Susan Allen Bragg, then married his cousin Nancy Jane Leatherwood, a daughter of Zachariah Leatherwood and Nancy Jane Allen. Nancy Jane was another daughter of William Lindsey Allen and Mary Calvert.

Though the 1870 federal census does not denote that Mark Lindsey is insane as the 1860 census had done, Mark’s loose-papers estate file contains a 9 October 1884 legal complaint his executor F.M. Trimmier filed in Spartanburg probate court against Mark’s heirs, in which he states that Mark was a “lunatic.”[14] As I stated previously, the estate file also has an annual return Trimmier filed 18 April 1887 showing Rachel Cooper paid for boarding and clothing Mark, with this document stating that he was a lunatic, evidently placed under her care. A final closing return in the file by George E. DeBard also identifies DeBard as the “committee of Mark Lindsey: Lunatic.”

9 May 1877 petition of F.M. Trimmier to administer estate of Mark Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose-papers estate file of Mark Lindsey, Spartanburg County, file 644

Mark Lindsey died in July 1875 in Spartanburg County, according to the 9 May 1877 petition filed in Spartanburg County by F.M. Trimmier to administer Mark’s estate.[15] The petition states that Mark was survived by brothers John and Dennis, both living out of state. F.M. Trimmier was Francis or Franklin Marion Trimmier (1837 – 1888), who was publisher of the Carolina Spartan and clerk of Spartanburg’s county court for some years.[16] The petition also notes that Mark died insolvent and it appeared his estate did not have sufficient funds to pay his debts.

9 October 1884 complaint of F.M. Trimmier, administrator of Mark Lindsey, vs. heirs of Mark Lindsey, in loose-papers estate file of Mark Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 644
18 April 1887 distribution of estate of Mark Lindsey, loose-papers estate file of Mark Lindsey, Spartanburg County, file 644

The previously mentioned lawsuit Trimmier filed in 1884 against Mark’s heirs names the heirs (in addition to his surviving brothers Dennis and John) as Isaac Lindsey’s children John N., Emily, and Milly Lindsey; Henry Lindsey’s children Margaret Roberts, Mary Glynn, Carrie Pearson, and Susan Childers (i.e., Childress); and Elizabeth Lindsey Cooper’s children Rachel Perry and Henry Cooper. The 1870 federal census, discussed below, gives the married surname of Henry’s daughter Mary as Gwin and not Glynn, and in the distribution of Mark’s estate, she is also called Mary Gwynn. Though the 1870 census listing does not state that Mary was Susan Lindsey’s daughter, I see no reason to doubt that this was the case.

7. Henry Lindsey

As a previous posting has noted, William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest’s son Henry was born about 1804. The 1850 federal census shows Henry’s age as 46, and in 1860, his age is given as 56 on the federal census.[17]

By April 1834, Henry had joined Cedar Grove Baptist church in Laurens County, a church to which his siblings Cassandra, Nicy Malinda, Elizabeth, and Isaac also belonged. The minutes of Cedar Grove church state that on 5 April 1834, the church “appointed Brethren Moses Fowler & J.M. Bradley to cite Br. Henry Lindsey to our next Church Meetg.” Church minutes for 2 May 1834 state that the case of Henry Lindsey had been called, but he not being present, the case was laid over till the next meeting. Church minutes for 31 May 1834 state, “Br Andrew Harbin called the case of Br. Lindsey. The church declares nonfellowship with Henry Lindsey.” I do not find a record of his infraction in the Cedar Grove minutes.

As was also stated in a previous posting, when Margaret Earnest and William and Rachel Earnest Lindsey deeded land for love and affection from the estate of Henry Earnest to a number of his grandsons on 5 October 1835, Henry Lindsey was among the grandsons receiving a tract of land — in his case, 130 acres on Snorley Creek of the Enoree on which Henry was living.[18] The following month on 5 November 1835, Henry was a buyer at the estate sale of his grandfather Henry Earnest, purchasing enslaved people Mary and George.[19]

Also noted previously: at its June 1837 term, Spartanburg County equity court issued judgment in the suit of Rachel Lindsey vs. Peggy Earnest et al (Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Equity Court, 1837, box 18, package 6). The judgment settled Henry Earnest’s estate (then worth $9075.21) on Rachel Earnest Lindsey and husband William Lindsey jointly, to be divided equally between them during their lifetimes and then at their deaths, equally between their children. William Halbert and Isaac Lindsey were appointed trustees to take charge of the estate and effect the division, Halbert giving bond with William Johnson (husband of William and Rachel’s daughter Cassandra) and Isaac giving bond with his brother Henry.

Henry Lindsey appears as head of a household in Spartanburg County on the 1840 federal census, which shows his household with a male 5-10, a male 30-40, 2 females under 5, 1 female 5-10, 1 female 10-15, and 1 female 30-40.[20] This census lists no enslaved persons in Henry’s household. Henry’s siblings Elizabeth Cooper and Mark Lindsey are listed as heads of households on the same page, several houses removed from their brother Henry.

As will be seen below, though Henry died testate, his 14 November 1862 will in Spartanburg County is, unfortunately, one of those wills that simply mention “all my children,” in this case, with the exception of Henry’s son W.H. Lindsey, who is made a co-executor of the will along with J.R. Westmoreland. From the 1850, 1860, and 1870 censuses and the estate file of his brother Mark, it can be determined that Henry Lindsey and wife Susan/Susannah, whom he appears to have married around 1828-9, had children Margaret (born 10 May 1830), D., a male (born about 1831), Mary (born about 1831-2), Susan (born 29 March 1837), M., a female (born about 1839), F. a female (born about 1842), William H. (born 1842-4), and Amanda Cornelia (born 26 December 1847).

The 1840 federal census suggests that there was a daughter born 1835-1840 who did not live to 1850. The son with the initial D. (Dennis?) and the daughters with the initials M. (i.e., the second M.) and F. on the 1850 census also evidently died 1850-1860. For reasons I’ll explain in a moment, Henry’s loose-papers estate file in Spartanburg County unfortunately does not name his children at any point and has no final settlement showing the division of his property among his heirs. As stated above, the loose-papers estate file of Henry’s brother Mark shows Mark’s administrator F.M. Trimmier filing a 9 October 1884 lawsuit in Spartanburg probate court against Mark’s heirs, and Trimmier’s complaint in this lawsuit names Henry’s children living in October 1884 as Margaret Roberts, Mary Glynn, Carrie Pearson, and Susan Childers (i.e., Childress), and it shows these same children of Henry receiving a share of Mark’s estate in April 1887, with Mary now called Gwynn.[21]

As a prior posting indicates, on 26 February 1840, Henry Lindsey was among the heirs of Henry Earnest signing receipt for their shares of the estate of Henry Earnest — in his grandson Henry’s case, 130 acres of land.[22]

Also noted previously: at some unspecified date in 1840, Henry’s brother Isaac mortgaged 527 acres on which he was living in Spartanburg County along with a number of enslaved persons and his plantation tools and household goods and crops, as security for Henry’s continuation of the administration of the estate of their grandfather Henry Earnest.[23]

As several previous postings have stated (and here) By June 1845, Henry Lindsey’s brother Isaac Lindsey had been declared non compos mentis by the court and Henry was appointed guardian of Isaac. When Sterling P. Lanford, administrator of Isaac’s son William Riley Lindsey, filed suit against William’s brother John N. Lindsey in Spartanburg equity court in September 1869, Lanford stated in his legal complaint that Henry had built a house on his property in which to keep Isaac confined, after Isaac’s son William had initially assumed responsibility for his father.[24]

The equity court case file for this 1869 case contains an answer from Henry’s widow Susan to Lanford’s complaint, affirming Lanford’s information about Henry’s care for Isaac, and stating that Henry died 31 December 1862, at which time Isaac’s son John assumed responsibility for this father’s care. The loose-papers estate file of Isaac contains an account dated 28 February 1848, showing Henry paying the state asylum, where Isaac was confined when the 1850 federal census was taken, for care for Isaac in 1847.[25]

In the lawsuit that Henry’s mother Rachel Earnest Lindsey filed in Spartanburg equity court on 1 August 1846 against her son-in-law William A. Halbert, Rachel states in her complaint initiating her suit that the court had sought to appoint Henry administrator of the estate of her father Henry Earnest after Isaac Lindsey and William A. Halbert were removed as administrators, but Henry refused to assume this responsibility.[26] Rachel’s complaint also called on the court to force Henry to account, along with Rachel’s son-in-law William Johnson, for their use of Henry Earnest’s estate.

Henry Lindsey is enumerated on the 1850 federal census along with his family in Spartanburg County.[27] The census gives his name as H. Lindsay, aged 46, a farmer with $1,600 worth. In the household are wife S., 44, and children M., 21 (female), D. (male), 19, Mary, 18, S. (female), 16, M. (female), 11, W. (male), 8, and F. (female), 8. Henry does not appear on the 1850 federal slave schedule for Spartanburg County as a slaveholder. Note that Mary, whose birth year appears to be 1832 on this census, has an implied birth year of 1841 when she appears in her mother’s household on the 1870 census: see below.

Henry Lindsey appears (with C.P. Woodruff) as a witness to a 3 March 1852 sale of land by county commissioner Thomas O.P. Vernon to Rebecca Ellis, from the estate of Calvin Ellis, pursuant to an equity court order.[28] Henry Lindsey proved the deed on 6 (no month given, but it appears to be January) 1854.

The loose-papers estate file of Aaron Arnold shows Henry Lindsey along with J. B.(?) Westmoreland and W. T. Garrett appraising the estate of Aaron Arnold on 21 December 1857.[29] The appraisal account has the signatures of the three appraisers. 

Henry Lindsey and his family are enumerated on the 1860 federal census at Woodruff in Spartanburg County.[30] The census taker has rendered Henry’s name as Hendry Lindy, and lists him as aged 56, a farmer born in South Carolina, with $3,000 real worth and $3,452 personal worth. In the household are wife Susan, 54, son William (listed as Wm.), 16, a laborer, daughter Cornelia, 12, and Henry’s brother Mark, 50. As noted previously, the census taker has listed as a farmer with that word crossed out and the word “insane” written in the notations column. The 1860 federal slave schedule shows Henry holding four enslaved persons in the southern district of Spartanburg County.[31]

14 November 1862 will of Henry Lindsey, loose-papers estate file of Henry Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 932

As noted above, the answer of Henry’s widow Susan to Sterling P. Lanford’s complaint in the 1869 equity court case he filed on behalf of William R. Lindsey’s estate states that Henry died 31 December 1862 in Spartanburg County.[32] Henry’s loose-papers estate file in Spartanburg County contains his original will, which he made and signed 14 November 1862, naming his wife Susannah his whole legatee, with the stipulation that, at her death, his property was to be sold and equally divided among “all my children.” The will makes Henry’s son William H. Lindsey and J.R. Westmoreland co-executors, as noted above. J.M. Fowler, James Young, and J.R. Westmoreland witnessed the will and Fowler proved the will on 31 March 1863.[33]

6 April 1863 appeal of Susan Lindsey for execution of will of Henry Lindsey, loose-papers estate file of Henry Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 932
26 April 1863 bond of Susan Lindsey for execution of estate of Henry Lindsey, loose-papers estate file of Henry Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 932

On 6 April 1863, Susannah filed as executrix of the estate, with her appeal noting that her son William H. Lindsey had been appointed executor, but was not of age to assume this legal duty, and J.R. Westmoreland was disqualified from this duty as a witness subscribing to Henry’s will. The estate file shows the widow Susannah giving bond as executrix on 26 April 1863 in the amount of $10,000 with C.P. Woodruff and D.D. Westmoreland, and S.C.S. Childress witnessing the bond. This is evidently Susannah’s daughter Susan Childress. The original bond is in the estate file.

26 November 1863 appraisal and inventory of estate of Henry Lindsey in loose-papers estate file of Henry Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 932

Susan’s execution of the estate was confirmed by the court on 10 October 1863, and on that day, she made oath as executrix. The estate was appraised 26 November 1863 by A.F. Green, Andrew Westmoreland, and Charles Pearson. The estate inventory names four enslaved persons who are, I think, the four enslaved persons listed as belonging to Henry on the 1860 federal slave schedule for Spartanburg County: Lee, Dock, and Nisey and her daughter Janey. The slave schedule had given only ages, genders, and complexion color for the four enslaved persons: males 38, 28, 27, and one year and two months old, all black. Note that the slave schedule lists no enslaved females, but in my view, it’s likely that one of the male enslaved persons aged 28 or 27 was Nisey and the child was Nisey’s child Janey.

The estate file contains no sale account — probably because the estate was left entirely in Susannah’s hands until her death — and no list of the children, as previously noted. Again, if the estate was left entirely to Susannah, there would have been no division of property until she died.

The 1870 federal census shows Susannah heading her household at Reidville, Glenn Springs post office, in Spartanburg County.[34] Her name is given as Susanah Lindsey, aged 65, a farmer, born in South Carolina with $800 real worth and $450 personal worth. In her household are son-in-law Thomas Pearson, 23, his wife Amanda, 22, and their children Nora, 2, and Dillard, 3 months (born in February, the census taker writes), as well as daughter Mary Gwin, 29.

Susannah (“Sousana Lindsey”) is enumerated again on the 1880 federal census at Reidville, now as a widow living alone.[35] The census states that she’s 60, unemployed, and a widow born in South Carolina of South Carolina-born parents. Two houses prior to Susannah on the same census page is the family of Susannah’s son-in-law Thomas Pearson and daughter Cornelia, whose name appears here as Pernelia. Susannah’s age on this census is obviously not correct.

I have not found a date or place of death for Susannah. To me, it seems likely she died after 1880 in Spartanburg County, probably at Reidville. I have also not found Susan’s/Susannah’s surname. A plethora of family tree charts at Ancestry and elsewhere purport to give her maiden name, without offering any proof for the information they claim to be reporting. The death certificate of Henry and Susan’s daughter Susan states that her parents were Henry Lindsey and Susan Lindsey.[36]

The children of Henry Lindsey and wife Susan/Susannah are as follows (all surname Lindsey prior to marriage):

Tombstone of Margaret Lindsey Roberts, Wellford cemetery, Wellford, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, from her Find a Grave memorial page created by David ~ Effie; photo uploaded by David ~ Effie

1. Margaret Lindsey was born 10 May 1830 in Spartanburg County, and died 24 June 1914, probably in Spartanburg County. Margaret married Seaborn R. Roberts, and both are buried in Wellford cemetery, Wellford, Spartanburg County, with tombstones giving their dates of birth and death. Seaborn was born 5 October 1818 and died 2 March 1893. As has been previously noted, Seaborn Roberts was one of the appraisers of Isaac Lindsey’s estate on 17 November 1873.

2. Mary Lindsey was born about 1831-2 in Spartanburg County. I have been unable to find much information about this child of Henry and Susan/Susannah. She may have married prior to 1860, since she is not listed in her parents’ household on the federal census of that year. As noted above, she is in her parents’ household in 1850 with an implied birth year of 1832, and is back in her mother’s household in 1870 with an implied birth year of 1841, listed as Mary Gwin. She was still living on 9 October 1884 when F.M. Trimmier filed his legal complaint against Mark Lindsey’s heirs, naming her as Mary Glynn, though, as noted previously, when Mark’s estate was distributed in April 1887 — again, she was still living then — she is called Mary Gwynn. I do not find Mary on the 1880 (or the 1860) federal census.

Tombstone of Susan Lindsey Childress, Fountain Inn cemetery, Fountain Inn, Greenville County, South Carolina, from her Find a Grave memorial page created by Robin Fairly Dixson Coon, photo uploaded by Katie Jewett

3.  Susan Lindsey was born 29 March 1837 in Spartanburg County, and died 20 November 1920 at Austin in Greenville County, South Carolina. She married Thaddeus Constantine Sobieski Childress, who was born 19 July 1830 in Laurens County and died 4 July 1921 at Greenville in Greenville County, son of John Childress. Susan and husband Thaddeus are buried in Fountain Inn cemetery at Fountain Inn in Greenville County. Thaddeus Constantine Sobieski was, by the way, a character in a popular novel, Thaddeus of Warsaw, published in 1803 by Scottish novelist Jane Porter.

4. William H. Lindsey was born 1842-4 in Spartanburg County. He is listed in his parents’ household on the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses, and was living on 6 April 1863, when his mother filed for execution of the estate of his father Henry Lindsey. This document refers to William as a minor heir of Henry Lindsey in 1863. I have found no record of him after this date, including in Civil War records for South Carolina. William had evidently died before 9 October 1884, when F.M. Trimmier’s legal complaint found in the loose-papers estate file of Mark Lindsey named Henry’s children. It appears, in fact, that he died 1860-1870. 

Tombstone of Amanda Cornelia Lindsey Pearson, Cedar Grove Baptist cemetery, Fountain Inn, Laurens County, South Carolina, from her Find a Grave Memorial page created by Robin Fairley Dixson Coon, photo uploaded by JT Moon

5. Amanda Cornelia Lindsey was born 26 December 1847 in Spartanburg County, and died 28 May 1899 at Woodruff in Spartanburg County. She married Thomas Mathis Pearson, who was born 16 December 1846 in Spartanburg County, and died 27 October 1921 at Woodruff in Spartanburg County. Thomas was son of Charles Pearson and Martha Matilda Brown. Cornelia is buried at Cedar Grove Baptist cemetery at Fountain Inn in Laurens County, with her tombstone giving her name as Corrie, and Thomas is buried at Bellview Baptist cemetery in Woodruff.


[1] 1850 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 305 (dwelling and family 3153; 17 December); 1860 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, southern division, Woodruff post office, p. 386 (dwelling and family 1246; 14 September); 1870 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Reidville, Glenn Springs post office, p. 557A (dwelling and family 434; 2 July).

[2] 1820 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 250.

[3] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. V, pp. 565-6.

[4] Ibid., Deed Bk. W, pp. 432-4.

[5] 1840 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 124.

[6] See supra, n. 1.

[7] 1850 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 145A (dwelling and family 863; 27 August).

[8] 1850 federal census, Richland County, South Carolina, Columbia, p. 31 (dwelling 542, family 575; 22 October).

[9] 1850 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 305 (dwelling and family 3152; 17 December).

[10] See supra, n. 1.

[11] See supra, n. 1.

[12] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose-papers estate files #644 (1877), estate of Mark Lindsey.

[13] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Will Bk. B, p. 53.

[14] See supra, n. 12.

[15] Ibid. See also Spartanburg Herald, 9 May 1877.

[16] See his biography in J.B.O. Landrum, History of Spartanburg County, Embracing an Account of Many Important Events, and Biographical Sketches of Statesmen, Divines and Other Public Men (Atlanta: Franklin, 1900), pp. 460-1.

[17] 1850 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 275A (dwelling/family 2712; 28 November); 1860 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Woodruff post office, p. 386 (dwelling 1246, family 1244; 14 September).

[18] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. V, pp. 566-7.

[19] Estate of Henry Earnest, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose-papers estate files, Henry Earnest estate, file 840 — account of sale of personal estate, 5 November 1835.

[20] 1840 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 124.

[21] See supra, n. 12.

[22] See supra, n. 19.

[23] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. X, pp. 264-5.

[24] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Equity Court, 1869, box 50, package 2, Isaac Lindsey, etc., vs. John N. Lindsey.

[25] See loose-papers estate file of Isaac Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 1011; and 1850 federal census, Richland County, South Carolina, Columbia, p. 31 (dwelling 542, family 575; 22 October).

[26] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Equity Court, 1846, box 31, package 7, Rachel Lindsey vs. William Halbert.

[27] See supra, n. 17.

[28] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. FF, pp. 24-7.

[29] Loose-papers estate file of Aaron Arnold, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 2452.

[30] See supra, n. 17.

[31] 1860 federal slave schedule, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, unpaginated, 15 September.

[32] See supra, n. 24.

[33] Loose-papers estate file of Henry Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, file 932; the will is recorded in Will Bk. E, p. 198.

[34] 1870 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Reidville, Glenn Springs post office, p. 556B (dwelling/family 423, 2 July). 

[35] 1880 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Reidville, p. 314B (ED 146, dwelling/family 428; 10 June).  

[36] Death certificate of Susan Lindsey, South Carolina Death Records, Greenville County, 1920, #23694.

3 thoughts on “Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Mark and Henry

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