Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey Hunter (1834-1921) — Children of William Hunter and Margaret Lindsey

The children of William T. Hunter and Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey are as follows:

1. James Walter Hunter was born 22 July 1854 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, and died 28 September 1864 in Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish, Louisiana. He is buried with a tombstone giving his dates of birth and death and name as J.W. Hunter in Liberty Baptist cemetery at Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana.

Mary Jane Hunter Giddings, from Charles Coody’s “Coody and Thomas Family Tree” at Ancestry

2. Mary Jane Hunter was born 13 April 1857 at Oakville in Lawrence County, Alabama, and died 21 March 1902 in Red River Parish, Louisiana. On 28 January 1879 in Red River Parish, she married James Chesley Giddings, son of Erastus James Giddings and Retincia Adeline Trice. James and Mary Jane are buried at Bethel Baptist cemetery at Coushatta in Red River Parish. Their children (all surname Giddings):

William Chesley (married Mary Sarah Elizabeth Tomlin, daughter of Jackson Coleman Tomlin and Martha L. Hester); Louella Mae; Margaret Estelle (married William Marion Horner); James Uriah (married Susan Tommie Morgan, daughter of Lennon Woodson Morgan and Sophronia A. Loftin); Mary Retincia (married George Washington Murphy, son of Elias Murphy and Laura Ann Koonce); Elizabeth Mae (married William Isaac Thomas, son of John R. Thomas and Elizabeth E. Hadwin); Louvisa (married Lester Tillman Huckabay, son of George Franklin Huckabay and Martha Beulah Watson); and Emma (married Oswell Ray Detro, son of Roland Augustus Detro and Marcella McGee).

When Bethel Baptist church, an offshoot of the Liberty church founded by Reverend John Dupree and later pastored by William Marshall Hunter, was constituted in Red River Parish on 31 March 1863, James Chesley Giddings’s father Erastus James Giddings was one of its constituting members. Bethel was constituted at the house of William J. Winn, with John Dupree presiding.[2]

A handwritten account of the Huckabay and Giddings families written by Emma Lou Huckabay, daughter of Andrew Jackson Franklin Huckabay (1845-1923) and Laura Elizabeth Giddings (1848-1928), a sister of James Chesley Giddings, states that Erastus James Giddings and wife Retincia Adeline Trice came from Georgia to Louisiana, settling near the Huckabay family (another Georgia-to-Louisiana family) at Black Lake in Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish. This undated document was transcribed by Sharon Laizure Hofer and published at the USGenweb site for Bienville Parish, Louisiana, where it is now archived. As Sharon Hofer’s notes state, Emma Lou Huckabay’s niece Mildred Huckabay of Coushatta, Louisiana, owned the original document in 1989.[3]

Note that William Hunter and Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey also settled near Black Lake in a part of Natchitoches Parish that became Red River Parish in 1871. 

Sons of William Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree, Coushatta, Louiaiana, about 1901-1902, from Polly Perez’s “Perez/Fulbright Family Tree” at Ancestry

3. William Marshall Hunter was born 20 February 1859 in Lawrence County, Alabama, and died 22 April 1935 at Coushatta, Red River Parish, Louisiana. On 8 January 1879 in Red River Parish, he married Laura Jane Dupree, daughter of Dr. Daniel Ivy Dupree and Susan Frances Hogan. Marshall and Laura Jane are buried at Liberty cemetery, Martin, Red River Parish

The children of William Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree (all surname Hunter):

Ida Mae (married Elbert Luther Snead, son of Henry Clay Snead and Lucy Frances Harris); William Orie (married Sarah E. Crawford, daughter of Grosvenor Brown Crawford and Elizabeth Emma Amelia Green); Walter Benjamin (married Margaret Sue Edwards, daughter of William Allison Edwards and Susan James Morphis); Uriah Hogan (married Dora Ann Jones, daughter of Francis Marion Jones and Lula L. Adams; Osie Lee (married David Lafayette Greer, son of William Martin Greer and Martha Elizabeth Waters); Ivy Tilden (married Susan Lou Orr, daughter of Samuel Collier Orr and Margaret Almedia Fletcher); QRetta (married Buren Simeon Snead, son of Henry Clay Snead and Lucy Frances Harris); Oliver Bonaparte (married Lavada Artimatha Breedlove, daughter of John Alfred Breedlove and Margaret Melvina Pickett); Edison Everett (married 1] Cora Jane Jones and 2] Floria Livonia Jones, both daughters of Francis Marion Jones and Lula L. Adams); Susie Mae Margaret; Surrey Dupree (married Gladys Grace Hawthorne, daughter of Emery Waltarn Hawthorne and Florence Verona McDonald); Marshall Ezra (married Willie Mae Greer, daughter of Virgil Jerome Greer and Mary Ann Holley); and Laura Jane (married Phillip Long Morgan, son of Jefferson Davis Morgan and Mary Lousetta Jerusha Loftin).

Henry C. Lindsey, The Mark Lindsey Heritage: 1740-1983 (Brownwood, Texas, 1983), p. 107B, reproducing Hershel Culpepper, “Your Family Tree,” Coushatta Citizen (September 1982).

As my previous posting stated, biographical information about Marshall Hunter appears in a column by Hershel Culpepper in the Coushatta Citizen newspaper from September 1982. The column notes that it’s transcribing a taped interview with John W. Cannon, who remembered both Marshall and his father William “Uncle Billy” Hunter. At times, this interview (which appears in a photocopy in Henry C. Lindsey’s Mark Lindsey Heritage) appears to be conflating the two men; much that it says about “Uncle Billy” cites facts that clearly apply to his son Marshall.[4]

John Cannon states the following about Marshall Hunter: 

Marshall Hunter was a man of different trades. He was successful in some of them. I’ve had quite a lot of dealings with him for years and years. In fact, Marshall Hunter, Rev. W.M. Hunter they later called him, became a Baptist preacher. First licensed and then he was ordained a minister. …

[He — Cannon speaks here of “Uncle Billy,” but what he says clearly refers to William Hunter’s son Marshall] was counted one of the leading and best farmers in the country. He broke his land with what they called a “Bull Tom” or “Scooter.” It took about nine times to the row. So he was first a farmer and then he was a booking agent. He tried everything. Some of it he succeeded. And all the time he was a strict member of the church. Finally, he became a Justice of the Peace, then a merchant.

He went into merchantizing [sic]. Then he got interested in politics. He was an active member of the Populist Party around 1890-1888 to 1895. He ran for Representative on the Populist ticket and it was usually believed he won the election, but at that time, the other party hadn’t been ousted. They had full control of the election and it was thought that they may have counted him out. I remember the election, but I was only about sixteen.

I remember Preacher Hunter — I believe he hadn’t become ordained at that time — on his way to Baton Rouge to contest the election. I remember he had on a new straw hat and was on foot, going to Baton Rouge. He passed up through the country here. Of course, he expected to ride some down about Natchitoches and from there on. But he didn’t win out. Later he ran for the same office on the Democratic ticket, but he didn’t win. But, anyway, he was a success. He was a successful ginner. He ran a gin for awhile. He was a successful merchant.  He was handy for the community — to trade there — and it especially helped his own family and neighbors. He was able to give his own family an education, which was ten or twelve of them. He ran a post office a long time — Liberty Post Office.

The contested election to which John Cannon refers above may be one that resulted in a case that ended up before the Louisiana Supreme Court.[5] In this case, The State Ex Rel. W.M. Hunter vs. R.L. Capers, Marshall Hunter claimed that he had won an election for justice of the peace in the second ward of Red River Parish in April 1884, but the state then certified his opponent R.L. Capers as the winner. Hunter protested, and the 10th District Court found in favor of Capers with the Supreme Court upholding the decision.

The newspaper Natchitoches Populist reports on 28 June 1898 that Marshall Hunter was being proposed as head of the nominating committee from Red River Parish for Populist Party candidates for state Congress.[6] As I have noted previously, the same newspaper on 10 April 1896 shows Frank McWilliams, husband of Marshall Hunter’s first cousin Sarah Jane Kellogg, as a member of the executive committee of the People’s Party in Natchitoches Parish.[7]

On 27 March 1896, Natchitoches Populist reported from Red River Parish that Alex Lindsay [sic], Frank Wren, and Simmons [i.e., Simeon] Thomas had aligned themselves with the Populist Party, and that the Democratic party was seeking to suppress the African-American vote — and trying unsuccessfully to get the Populists to work with the Democrats in that effort. Alex Lindsay was Alexander Cobb Lindsey, another first cousin of Marshall Hunter — son of Marshall’s uncle Mark Jefferson Lindsey.[8]

An April 1902 photo of members of the Holley Springs Farmers’ Union, published in the Coushatta Citizen on 27 July 1978, shows Alec Lindsey (Dr. A.L. Lindsey, in the photo’s list of names), as a member of that group in 1902. The Farmers’ Union was an offshoot of the People’s Party that sought to bring middle-class and small farmers together across racial lines to challenge the attempt of large landholders to reduce these types of farmers to sharecropper status. 

Marshall Hunter’s continuing interest in political matters over several decades is evident in a mention of him in an article in the Shreveport Times on 26 March 1911, which states that the preceding day, Marshall Hunter, a “prominent business man” of Red River Parish, had been elected president of the local chapter of the Good Government League.[9] An article in the same paper the preceding day states that the 25 March meeting at which W.M. Hunter, “a prominent business man of Coushatta,” was elected president of the Red River Parish chapter was its inaugural meeting.

On 5 Jun 1911, the New Orleans Times-Democrat notes that, the preceding day. W.M. Hunter of Coushatta had announced his candidacy for the state legislature. On 11 August, the same paper reported that W.M. Hunter had withdrawn from the race the preceding day.

Marshall Hunter with sons in front of his store, Coushatta, Louiaiana; from Barney Hunter, “Hunter Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989), p. 252

As the preceding Shreveport Times notice and John Cannon’s oral remembrance of Marshall Hunter both note, he was considered a very successful businessman in Red River Parish. He first opened a store in the Liberty community northeast of the parish seat, Coushatta, and then later in his life, moved that business to Coushatta, handing it on to his sons. Barney Hunter’s article “Hunter Family” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage includes a photo of Marshall standing in front of the Coushatta store at an unspecified date, with his sons on either side of him.[10] The previous posting includes a photocopy of a 14 June 1920 letter Marshall wrote his mother Margaret Lindsey Hunter on the letterhead of this store, which was principally owned at that time by Marshall’s son Uriah Hogan Hunter.

Reverend John Dupree (1806-1889, from Sherrie Maddox’s “Bounds Family Tree” at Ancestry
Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism marker commemorating John D\upree, at Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana

As was also noted previously, Marshall Hunter’s wife Laura Jane Dupree was the granddaughter of Reverend John Dupree, founder of Liberty Baptist church that Marshall pastored for a number of years, and in whose cemetery he and Laura Jane (as well as his parents and Laura’s mother) are buried. Laura was born 30 June 1863 in Bienville Parish and died 1 September 1951 at Coushatta. Her parents Dr. Daniel Ivy Dupree and Susan Frances Hogan came from Georgia to Bienville Parish in 1860 along with Daniel’s father John Dupree, a Baptist minister who founded sixteen Baptist churches in northwest Louisiana before returning to Georgia. He is said to have traveled 2,000-3,000 miles a year on horseback under the auspices of the Red River Baptist Association, preaching 200-300 sermons per year.[11] A marker placed by the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation, and Tourism at Martin, Louisiana, at the crossroads of highways 155 and 507 commemorates John and his missionary work in northwest Louisiana.

An article by Barney Hunter in Red River Parish: Our Heritage “William Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree” transcribes an obituary of Marshall Hunter from an unidentified local newspaper.[12] The obituary states,

Citizens throughout Red River Parish were deeply grieved Monday when death suddenly claimed Rev. William Marshall Hunter, prominent pioneer citizen of the parish at his home here about 4 P.M., a few hours after being stricken with acute indigestion (heart attack) while on a visit to the business section of the town Monday morning.

The deceased was born in Lawrence County, Alabama, on Feb. 20, 1859. He came to this parish with his parents when a small child. He was a member of one of the largest and best known families in the parish. And for a number of years was prominently engaged in the mercantile business, at Liberty and later Coushatta….

“Pioneer Citizen of Coushatta Is Taken in Death,” Shreveport Times (23 April 1935), p. 5, col. 5

An obituary of Marshall Hunter entitled “Pioneer Citizen of Coushatta Is Taken in Death” also appeared in Shreveport Times on 23 April 1935.[13] This speaks of him as “a prominent merchant and one of the leading pioneers in the parish.”

Marshall and Laura Jane Dupree Hunter’s daughters Ida Mae (top right) and Osie Lee (front left) with Emmett Bunyan Snead and sister Harriet Frances Snead, children of Henry Clay Snead and Lucy Frances Harris; Ida Mae married their Emmett’s and Hattie’s brother Elbert Luther Snead

In 1986, I was treated to a demonstration of Marshall Hunter’s preaching style by a cousin who remembered him well and heard him preach on numerous occasions. This cousin, Lucy Price Grafton, may not have realized that Marshall was my relative through the Lindsey family. Lucy was a cousin of mine through the Snead line: my grandfather Benjamin Dennis Lindsey married Lucy’s aunt Vallie Snead, two of whose brothers, Elbert and Buren, married daughters of Marshall Hunter. 

Cousin Lucy Grafton told me that she and her sisters used to find Reverend Hunter’s preaching voice, which was high and quavery, very amusing, and they’d do imitations of it at home — a sample of which she then treated me to. He once stopped a sermon to instruct some of the girls in the church in his high, quavering delivery to chastise some boys creating a ruckus outside the church, Lucy told me, and that line, in particular, lived on in her memory: “Girls, go tell those boys to make those dogs stop chasing those hogs.”[14]

Marshall Hunter has been discussed in a number of previous postings, one noting that a 1 May 1877 letter of his aunt Sarah Lindsey Speake to his mother Margaret Lindsey Hunter notes that he was leaving home (or had recently done so), and that his mother and aunt were worried about his being ruined by bad associations. Another posting discussed a murder that occurred in front of Marshall Hunter’s store on 22 June 1900, in which Marshall’s nephew Dick Kellogg shot Frank Wren.

Family of Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree, about 1899, from Barney Hunter, “Hunter Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989), p. 252

A photo of the family of Reverend Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree appears in an episode of the PBS “American Experience” series about Reconstruction. The video is on YouTube; the photo appears at about the 9:15 mark. It’s used by the series to provide an illustration of a typical middle-class Southern family in the Reconstruction period.

I think this photo dates from about 1899, since all thirteen of the couple’s children are in the photo, and Laura is holding the baby of the family, Laura Jane, who was born in that year. It would have been taken in Coushatta. The same photo appears in Barney Hunter’s article “Hunter Family.”[15]

4. Louvisa Frances was born 8 March 1860 in Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, and died 13 December 1941 at Martin, Red River Parish. On 26 January 1881 in Red River Parish, she married Samuel Hiram Kellogg, son of Samuel Hiram Kellogg and Frances Rebecca Lindsey. I discussed the family of Louvisa Frances and Samuel in this previous posting about the Kellogg family. Frances Rebecca Lindsey was Louvisa Frances Hunter’s aunt, a sister of Louvisa’s mother Margaret. The posting I have just linked also has an account of Louvisa and Samuel’s children.

Charles Henry Hunter, from Barney Hunter, “Charles Henry Hunter,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989) p. 255

5. Charles Henry was born 6 March 1864 in Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish, Louisiana, and died 11 March 1899 at Martin, Red River Parish. On 2 January 1884 at Lake Village in Natchitoches Parish, he married Rhoda Ross, daughter of William Crocker Ross and Prudence Grillette. Charles Henry is buried at Liberty cemetery at Martin. Rhoda (who married a second time following Charles Henry’s death) is buried at Spring Ridge cemetery at Pleasant Hill in Sabine Parish, Louisiana.

Children of Charles Henry Hunter and Rhoda Ross, from Barney Hunter, “Charles Henry Hunter,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989) p. 25 6

The children of Charles Henry Hunter and Rhoda Ross (all surname Hunter):

William Earnest (married Eunice Eva Ryals, daughter of William Perry Ryals and Eudora Tinzie Ann Monk); Clara Camilla (married Eugene Kincaid Osborn, son of William Marion Osborne and Elizabeth J. Luckey); Henry Elmer; Charles Edwin (married Sula Pearl Teer, daughter of Simeon Thomas Teer and Mary Louvinia Dupree); Mary Laetitia (married Herbert Vernon Rushing, son of William Jefferson Rushing and Lula Elizabeth Walker); Francis Walton; Elva; Nuell; and Charles Leon (married Julia Eloise Adkins, daughter of Davis Marion Adkins and Lula Mentoria Caston; Julia was the widow of Melton Bamburg when Charles Henry married her). 

In an article entitled “Charles Henry Hunter” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, Barney Hunter provides biographical information about Charles Henry, his wife Rhoda Ross, and their children.[16] He notes that Rhoda’s father Crocker Ross was a doctor in Natchitoches Parish who represented that parish in the Louisiana legislature, and that Charles Henry was a skilled “axe man” who helped build Clear Springs Baptist church along with houses in Red River Parish. According to Barney Hunter, Charles Henry died at age 35 of a fever, leaving his wife Rhoda a young widow of 32 with a large family of children to raise, one of them, Charles Leon, not yet three months old when his father died.

6. Ida Tranquilla was born 12 November 1866 in Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish, Louisiana, and died 24 August 1871 at Martin, Red River Parish. 

7. John Dennis was born 6 February 1869 in Natchitoches (later Red River) Parish, Louisiana, and died 16 July 1951 in Rapides Parish. On 13 June 1888 in Red River Parish, he married Norma Louella Elliott, daughter of Henry Pierce Elliott and Emily Martin. John and Norma are buried at Liberty cemetery, Martin, Red River Parish. The children of John Dennis Hunter and Norma Louella Elliott (all surname Hunter):

Norma Louella Elliott Hunter

Ida Lorene; Anna Lee (married Byron Leon Brown, son of Joseph Calvin Brown and Luella Longino); Norman Fletcher; William Clarence (married Mary Lee Gertrude Rawls, daughter of William Virgil Rawls and Sarah Elizabeth Adcock); Clovis (married Alva Arlington Johnston, son of Lewis L. Johnston and Melvina Rinehart); Wiley Washington (married Virginia Parvino, daughter of Andrew Charles Parvino and Alice Bond); Hazel (married Louis B. Arnoldi, son of Herman A. Arnoldi and Emma Schultz); John Kermit (married Maggie Viola McCart, daughter of William Walter McCart and Mary Lorena Giddings); Odell; Ray; Walter Benjamin; Norma Annette (married James Claude Evans).

For a photo of John Dennis Lindsey, his mother Margaret, and his children taken about 1910-1911, see the previous posting.

8. George Washington was born 11 February 1871 at Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana, and died 20 August 1874 at Martin. He is buried at Liberty cemetery at Martin.

9. Thomas Jefferson was born 27 July 1873 at Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana, and died 17 July 1877 at Martin. 

Willie Sockwell Ross Hunter, wife Lou Ella Teer, and sons Ovid Bunyan and Simeon Thurman Hunter, about 1900

10. Willie Sockwell Ross was born 27 February 1879 at Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana, and died 24 November 1905 at Coushatta, Red River Parish. On 3 February 1897 in Red River Parish, he married Lou Ella Teer, daughter of Simeon Thomas Teer and Mary Louvinia Dupree. Both are buried at Liberty cemetery, Martin, Red River Parish, Louisiana. The children of Willie Sockwell Ross Hunter and Louella Teer (all surname Hunter):

Ovid Bunyan (married Cora S. Gillen, daughter of William C. Gillen and Mary Elizabeth Harville); Simeon Thurman (married Minne Adkins, daughter of Davis Marion Adkins and Lula Mentoria Caston); William Leslie (married Clothilde Rawls, daughter of George Clifton Rawls and Lula Gertrude Graham); and Charles Mercer Brittain (married O.C. Underwood, daughter of Josiah S. Underwood and Mary Elizabeth Rawls).

An article about Willie Sockwell Ross Hunter and his family by an unidentified author is in Red River Parish: Our Heritage. This states that after their marriage in 1897, he and wife Lou Ella lived and farmed with his parents for a year or so, then moved to the place of his older brother Marshall Hunter in the Liberty community, farming there and eventually buying 120 acres.[17] The fact that Marshall owned a cotton gin helped his younger brother save money for his purchase of land and a house of his own. 

The article also notes that Willie was the first farmer in Red River Parish to do “terrace farming,” something he then assisted other local farmers to do. He played an active role in the Woodmen of the World organization, and played the fiddle and French harp before his death from pneumonia at the young age of 26. His wife Lou Ella developed pneumonia at the same time, recovering with the assistance of her father and brothers Dr. Wiley Teer, Simeon Teer, and Zuma Teer. She then continued the family’s farm, bringing in additional income by doing washing for neighbors and teaching school.

Shreveport Journal (7 March 1949), p. 2, col. 4-5

[1] 1900 federal census, Red River Parish, Louisiana, ward 2, p. 10 (ED 33; dwelling 148, family 150; June [no day given]); 1910 federal census, Red River Parish, Louisiana, ward 2, p. 2B (ED 96; dwelling and family 20; 18 April).

[2] Gwen Bradford Sealy, Lest We Forget: A Record of Tombstone Inscriptions, Red River Parish, Louisiana, and Vicinity (priv. publ., Shreveport, Louisiana, 1983), p. 20A.

[3] See also Louise Giddings Long, “Giddings Family” and Libby Huckabay Dozier, “Andrew Jackson Franklin Huckabay,” both in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989), pp. 194, 239-240.

[4] Henry C. Lindsey, The Mark Lindsey Heritage: 1740-1983 (Brownwood, Texas, 1983), p. 107B, reproducing Hershel Culpepper, “Your Family Tree,” Coushatta Citizen (September 1982).

[5] Reports of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Louisiana, vol. 37 (New Orleans: F.F. Hansel, 1886), pp. 747f.

[6] Natchitoches Populist (28 June 1898), p. 2, col. 1.

[7] Natchitoches Populist (10 April 1896), p. 2, col. 3.

[8] Natchitoches Populist (27 March 1896), p. 2, col. 5.

[9] Shreveport Times (26 March 1911), p. 12, col. 4.

[10] Barney Hunter, “Hunter Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 252. The photo also appears in Henry C. Lindsey, Mark Lindsey Heritage, p. 108.

[11] Daniel E. Dupree, “The Duprees of Red River Parish,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 162-164.

[12] Barney Hunter, “William Marshall Hunter and Laura Jane Dupree,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 265-6.

[13] “Pioneer Citizen of Coushatta Is Taken in Death,” Shreveport Times (23 April 1935), p. ,5, col. 5.

[14] According to William Warren Sweet, Religion on the American Frontier: The Baptists, 1783-1830 (NY: Cooper Square, 1964), p. 10, Baptist ministers in the colonial period developed a preaching style that came to be referred to as the “holy whine,” a sing-song method of speaking that continued to be practiced by some Baptist ministers on the frontier for many years. On 14 May 1884, Marshall bought land in Red River Parish from Henry Clay Snead, whose sons Elbert and Buren married Marshall’s daughters Ida Mae and QRetta: see Red River Parish Conveyance Bk. D, p. 392.

[15] Barney Hunter, “Hunter Family,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 252.

[16] Barney Hunter, “Charles Henry Hunter,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 255-7.

[17] Author unidentified, “Willie Sockwell Ross Hunter,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, pp. 266-8.

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