Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Frances Rebecca Lindsey Kellogg (1831-1916) — Children of Samuel Hiram Kellogg and Frances Rebecca Lindsey

Photo of tombstone of Martha Ann Kellogg Pridgen, Provencal cemetery, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, uploaded to her Find a Grave memorial page by William Foley

1. Martha Ann Kellogg was born 20 January 1850 in Itawamba County, Mississippi, and died 30 January 1936 at Provencal in Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, where she’s buried in Provencal cemetery with her husband Matthew W. Pridgen. The couple married on 24 August 1871 in Red River Parish. 

Photo of tombstone, Provencal cemetery, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, uploaded to Matthew Pridgen’s Find a Grave memorial page by Larry and Connie Schultz

His tombstone in Provencal cemetery gives Matthew’s year of birth as 1815, but his Confederate service papers (Co. A, 3rd Arkansas Cavalry) state that he was 28 when he deserted from his CSA unit at Franklin, Tennessee, on 5 April 1863. That would place his year of birth in 1835, closer to his date of birth on various federal censuses. Matthew had been conscripted into the CSA at Camden, Ouachita County, Arkansas, on 19 February 1863.[1]

The 1850, 1860, and 1870 federal censuses show Matthew living in Arkansas — in Union County in 1850 and in Ouachita County in 1860-1870.[2] In 1850 and 1860, he had a wife Samantha and children by her. By 1870, the census states that he was a widower. On that census, he was living in Camden, Arkansas, owning a livery business with merchant Payne Wood in the household. I do not find Matthew’s children by Samantha on the 1870 census, but the 1910 census shows one of them, Nathaniel, living with his step-mother Martha/Mattie Pridgen at Provencal and listed as her adopted son.

U.S. Congress, U.S. Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959, vol. 1, p. 458, online at Ancestry as database U.S. Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959

Matthew W. Pridgen bought 320 acres in Union County, Arkansas, from the federal land office at Champagnolle in that county on 1 September 1860.[3] The land patent shows him living in Ouachita County, contiguous to Union on the north, when he bought the land. Before his conscription into the Confederate army, a receipt from the CSA shows him paid $84.96 on 26 February 1862 at Arkadelphia, Arkansas, for hauling 188+ bushels of corn for the army.[4]

Following the war, the U.S. Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959 shows him paid from 5 August 1872 into 1873 $1,760.01 for federal contracting work in Arkansas.[5] He appears again in this register in 1887 being paid $295 by the federal government, this time in Louisiana, where he lived after marrying Martha Ann Kellogg. In this registry listing, he was being paid as a contractor to deliver mail.[6]

“Confessions of a Mail Carrier,” New Orleans Republican (23 August 1876), p. 3, col. 1-2

An article in the New Orleans newspaper The Republican on 23 August 1876 confirms that Matthew Pridgen was already a mail contractor in August 1876, delivering mail from Hillsboro in Union County, Arkansas, where he then lived, to Monroe, Louisiana, and back.[7] Unfortunately, Matthew’s son William G. Pridgen, by wife Samantha, had taken money from letters he was delivering on his father’s behalf, and this was the occasion for the report in The New Orleans Republican. This article confirms that the Matthew Pridgen living in Union County, Arkansas, by 1850 with wife Samantha is the same Matthew Pridgen named in the other records I have cited, and indicates that after Matthew married Martha Ann Kellogg in Red River Parish, Louisiana, on 24 August 1871, the couple lived at first for some years in Union County, where their oldest son John Gunsell Pridgen was born 3 January 1873. By 1877, when the couple’s next child, a son Joshua, was born, the family had moved to Louisiana, where they lived briefly in St. Landry Parish and then moved to Provencal in Natchitoches Parish.

The children of Matthew W. Pridgen and Martha Ann Kellogg are (all with surname Pridgen):

John Gunsell (married Laura Virginia Thomason); Joshua (died young); Katherine (married Joseph Leroy Bruce); Hattie Cornelia (married Barney Boskes Bates); Annie (married George Whitfield Hawthorne); and Ida Mae (married Leo Cleveland Melancon).

2. Sarah Jane Kellogg (who was named for her grandmothers Sarah Harbour Kellogg and Jane Brooks Lindsey) was born 21 July 1852 in Itawamba or Pontotoc County, Mississippi, and died 29 July 1931 at Shreveport, Caddo Parish, Louisiana. On 29 January 1872 in Red River Parish, Louisiana, she married Benjamin Franklin McWilliams, son of Anderson McWilliams and Elizabeth Duff. 

Photo of tombstone in Provencal cemetery, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, uploaded by William Foley to Benjamin Franklin McWilliams’s Find a Grave memorial page

Frank McWilliams’s tombstone in Provencal cemetery, Provencal, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, gives his name as Rev. J.B. McWilliams. This is the only source I’ve seen giving B.F. McWilliams’s name as J.B. McWilliams. All other sources call him either B.F. or Frank McWilliams. According to an article about the WcWilliams families of Red River Parish, Louisiana, in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, Benjamin Franklin McWilliams was a son of Anderson McWilliams (1805-1877), who moved from Tennessee to Louisiana.[8] This source notes that Frank and Sarah Jane Kellogg McWilliams lived first at Grand Cane in DeSoto Parish and then settled in Shreveport. Various documents show them living in Nevada County, Arkansas, up to the late 1880s, when they moved to Provencal in Natchitoches Parish. Following Frank’s death in 1913, Sarah Jane then lived with her daughter Mauda in Calcasieu Parish before moving to Shreveport at the end of her life. An article in the Natchitoches Times on 21 January 1921 notes Mrs. Pridgen living in Provencal at the time, and reports her sick.

Natchitoches Times, 21 January 1921, p. 1, col. 2

An article in the Natchitoches Populist on 10 April 1896 shows Frank McWilliams as a member of the executive committee of the People’s Party in Natchitoches Parish on that date. An article in the same paper on 28 June 1898 shows a first cousin of Frank’s wife Sarah Jane, William Marshall Hunter, being proposed as head of the nominating committee for candidates of the People’s Party ticket for the state legislature in Red River Parish.

Natchitoches Populist, 10 April 1896, p. 2, col. 3

On 10 October 1897, the Shreveport Times reported that Parson Frank McWilliams of Provencal had shot and fatally wounded his cousin, also named Frank McWilliams.[9] Parson Frank was at that point acting town marshal in Provencal, and had arrested Jim McWilliams, brother to the man he shot. This caused bad blood between these family members, resulting in the shooting. On 30 October, Shreveport Times reported that Parson Frank McWilliams had been released from jail and exonerated of charges against him with a ruling of justifiable homicide.[10]

I have not been able to discover what church Frank McWilliams pastored. Note that the use of the title “Parson” in the Shreveport Times articles I’ve just cited confirms the information on his tombstone that he was a pastor.

Sarah Jane is not buried in Provencal cemetery with her husband Frank, but in Jewella cemetery in Shreveport. It appears her grave is not now marked. I suspect her marker may be the half-buried McWilliams tombstone that Sarah Spaulding photographed in May 2003 when she photographed tombstones in this cemetery, in which Sarah Jane’s daughter Zuetta and son Totsy Franklin are also buried.

The children of Benjamin Franklin McWilliams and Sarah Jane Kellogg (all with surname McWilliams): 

Amelia Elmeda (married James W. Plunkett); Zuetta Jane (married Albert B. Dennison); Rosa V.; Mauda Lee (married Walter Delcoure); and Totsy Franklin (married Laura Katherine Cryer).

Photo of William Dennis Kellogg uploaded to “Kellogg Family Tree” at Ancestry by kelloggwest
Photo of William Dennis Kellogg uploaded to “Kellogg Family Tree” at Ancestry by kelloggwest; the other persons not identified

3. William Dennis Kellogg was born 1 December 1854 at Homer, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, and died 17 April 1934 in Webster Parish, Louisiana.[11] On 22 December 1872 in Red River Parish, he married Virginia Ann Jenkins, daughter of Green Freeman Jenkins and Dinah Jane Poland. At some point before 1903, it appears William Dennis and Virginia may have divorced (? But see below, 1910 census) and he remarried Adeline Breedlove. I have not found a record of this second marriage.

By 1880, William Dennis and Virginia had gone to Freestone County, Texas.[12] In 1900, I don’t find William Dennis on the federal census. In that year, Jennie is listed as a widow and is enumerated on the census as head of her household in Henderson County, Texas — though William Dennis was still living.[13] He appears on the census twice in 1910: he’s in Red River Parish, Louisiana, on 28 April with wife Adeline, where the census says the couple have been married 7 years; and he’s in McLennan County, Texas, on 21 April with wife Jennie, where the census reports that the couple have been married 30 years.[14] The city directory of Waco shows Jennie living there in the period 1910-1916, listed each year as the widow of William D. Kellogg.[15]

By 1920, William Dennis is enumerated on the census in Bienville Parish, with the census stating that he is widowed.[16] William Dennis’s wife Adeline had died on 15 January 1915 in Red River Parish, but wife Virginia lived to 23 September 1927, when she died in Houston, Texas. In 1930, he’s living with son Samuel Freeman Kellogg and Samuel’s family in Harris County, Texas.[17]

I have not found a burial place for William Dennis Kellogg. Wife Virginia is buried at Forest Park cemetery in Houston, Texas.

The children of William Dennis Kellogg and Virginia Ann Jenkins (all surname Kellogg): 

Samuel Freeman (married Beulah S. Watson); Joseph Benjamin (died young); William Thomas (married Ruth L.); and Ola Mae (married Florentine Ivy Coley).

The children of William Dennis Kellogg and Adeline Breedlove:

Vashti (died young); Lillie Vallie (married Isaac Frank Chanler); Theodore (married Bertha Lee Murphy); Henry Alton (married Stella Cleo Kight); and Rodney.

Photo of tombstone of Samuel H. and Louvisa Frances Hunter Kelogg, Holley Springs cemetery, Red River Parish, Louisiana, uploaded by J. McMenis to their Find a Grave memorial pages

4. Samuel Hiram Kellogg was born 24 October 1858 at Homer, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, and died 4 October 1918 in Red River Parish, Louisiana. On 26 January 1881 in Red River Parish, he married Louvisa Frances Hunter, daughter of J. William Hunter and Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey. A copy of their marriage license is at the head of this posting. Samuel and Louvisa are buried in Holley Springs cemetery at Martin in Red River Parish, Louisiana.

Allege Son’s Blow with Stick Killed Father,” Shreveport Times (6 October 1918), p. 12, col. 1

Following their marriage, Samuel and Louvisa farmed in Red River Parish at Martin, northeast of Coushatta and raised their family there. Then on 3 October 1918, a tragedy occurred in this family. As the Shreveport Times reported on 6 October, on the 4th, Samuel, aged about 55, had come home intoxicated, causing a disturbance with his family.[18] As the brouhaha occurred, a son of Samuel, aged 17, ran into a cotton house. Samuel ordered the son to come out, and when he would not do so, went into the cotton house, at which point the son hit him in the head with a stick, causing his death. 

This son was Samuel and Louvisa’s son Charles Dale Kellogg. As the Shreveport Times article states, Charles claimed he acted in self-defense. I have found no reports stating that he was charged with a crime. He went on to marry in 1923 and spent his life in Red River Parish.

The children of Samuel Hiram Kellogg and Louvisa Frances Hunter (all with surname Kellogg):

Novella Frances (married Barney Fulton Nails); William Samuel; Basil Hiram (married 1] Levada E. Cummings, 2] Ada Vanhorn); Louella Virginia (married William Harmon Vanhorn); Richard Homer (married Roberta Birdie Adams); Mary Jane (married Newton Salathiel Coffey); Thomas Brooks (married Mattie Elizabeth Cummings); Waddy W. (died young); Louvisa Tranquilla (married Posey Lee Giddings); Charles Dale (married Gertrude Lorena Meek); and John Ewan (married Barbara Morgan).

5. Rebecca Frances Kellogg was born 24 December 1860 at Homer, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana. I find no record of Rebecca Frances after the 1870 census and assume she died after 1870, young and unmarried.

Photo of James Richard Curry Kellogg uploaded by Clyde Kellogg to his “Kellogg Family Tree” at Ancestry
Photo of Mary Rose Elliott Kellogg uploaded by Clyde Kellogg to his “Kellogg Family Tree” at Ancestry

6. James Richard Curry Kellogg was born 9 March 1864 in Homer, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, and died 5 February 1914 at Martin in Red River Parish. On 18 January 1889 in Red River Parish, he married Mary Rose Elliott, daughter of Henry Pierce Elliott and Emily Martin. Jim Kellogg’s The Kellogg Family in Louisiana documents this family in detail. As Jim Kellogg notes, following their marriage, James and Mary Rose settled at Martin in Red River Parish and raised their family there. 

“Coushatta News,” Shreveport Times (23 June 1900), p. 2, col. 2

Jim Kellogg writes, “In 1900, when he was 36, Dick Kellogg killed John Franklin ‘Little Frank’ (1881-1900) in front of William Marshall Hunter’s store in the Martin area.” An account of this incident in the Shreveport Times on 23 June 1900 provides specific details. The report states that the person Dick Kellogg shot was Frank Wren, aged 20, and that the murder occurred at the store of Marshall Hunter near Coushatta.[19] Marshall Hunter was Dick Kellogg’s first cousin, and he had a store at Martin, about 9 miles northeast of Coushatta, where he also pastored Liberty Baptist church, in whose cemetery he, his wife Laura Jane Dupree, and his parents William and Margaret Tranquilla Lindsey Hunter are buried. Liberty was founded by Laura Jane’s grandfather Reverend John Dupree, a pioneer Baptist missionary who came from Georgia to northwest Louisiana, founding a number of churches there.

As Jim Kellogg notes, Frank Wren was a son of James McHenry Wren, who was himself shot to death by an unknown party or parties in Red River Parish on 17 May 1899.[20] As these and other stories I’ve documented in this posting suggest, violence was endemic in northwest Louisiana following the Civil War, with some families carrying on feuds that had originated in the war for years after the war, and with people settling scores dating from the war even decades later. During the Reconstruction period, the violence and score-settling was so bad that the federal government set up a commission to investigate it.

Coushatta was the scene of violent events in August 1874, when the White League mounted a massacre of Black citizens in Red River Parish and of the Reconstruction leaders of that area and local citizens supporting them. The goal of this massacre was to end Reconstruction rule in northwest Louisiana and to begin forcing Black citizens back into a state of semi-servitude. Ted Tunnell’s book The Edge of the Sword provides an excellent, richly documented study of the Coushatta massacre and the way in which the violence (there were similar White League uprisings in other parts of Louisiana in the same period) kept spiralling for generations, with violent act leading to violent act as people kept feuding and settling scores.[21] In their Plain Folk, Planters, and the Complexities of Southern Society, Ricky Lee and Annette Pierce Sherrod also document the Reconstruction-era violence in northwest Louisiana and show how it drove some people targeted by the White League and its allies to leave Louisiana for Texas in order to protect themselves and their family members.[22]

James Richard Curry Kellogg and wife Mary Rose Elliott are buried in Clear Springs cemetery at Martin in Red River Parish. The children of this couple (all surname Kellogg):

Totsy Franklin (married 1] Alice Bonnie Carter, 2] Meroe Helen Dailey); Dennis Harlan (died young); Loretta (married Samuel H. Roberts); Frances (married 1] A.L. Swinney, 2] Grey Sigler, 3] Charles Arthur Eubanks, 4] John David Temple, 5] Alvin Foster); Henry Clyde (married Monique Coleman); James Roy (married Tura Perkins); Pleasant Curry (died young); and an infant who died at birth.

[1] NARA, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Arkansas, M137 RG 109.

[2] 1850 federal census, Union County, Arkansas, Boon, p. 242B; 1860 federal census, Ouachita County, Arkansas, Washington, Bridge Creek, and Fremont, p. 104; 1870 federal census, Ouachita County, Arkansas, Camden, p. 274B.

[3] Bureau of Land Management General Land Office Records, Arkansas Pre-1908 Homestead and Cash Entry Patents, vol. 228, p. 49, certificate 11318.

[4] NARA, Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-65, M346 RG 109; online at Fold3.

[5] U.S. Congress, U.S. Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959, vol. 1, p. 458, online at Ancestry as database U.S. Register of Civil, Military, and Naval Service, 1863-1959.

[6] Ibid., vol. 2, p. 128

[7] “Confessions of a Mail Carrier,” New Orleans Republican (23 August 1876), p. 3, col. 1-2.

[8] “John Carson & Mary Eliza Huckabay,” (author not named), in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, ed. Red River Parish Heritage Society (Bossier City: Everett, 1989), pp. 386-388.

[9] “A Provencal Shooting,” Shreveport Times (10 October 1897), p. 2, col. 1.

[10] Ibid. (30 October 1897), p. 2, col. 3.

[11] For his date and place of death, see Louisiana Archives, Records Management, Vital Records Indicesonline at Ancestry as Louisiana, Statewide Death Index, 1819-1964.

[12] 1880 federal census, Freestone County, Texas, p. 466B.

[13] 1900 federal census, Henderson County, Texas, p. 6, ED 57.

[14] 1910 federal census, Red River Parish, Louisiana, p. 8B, ED 96; 1910 federal census, McLennan County, Texas, Waco, p. 12B, ED 86.

[15] See e.g., Directory of the City of Waco, 1913 (Houston: Morrison & Fourmy, 1913), unpaginated (listings alphabetized); online at Ancestry, U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995.

[16] 1920 federal census, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, p. 3A, ED 10.

[17] 1930 federal census, Harris County, Texas, p. 10B, ED 193.

[18] “Allege Son’s Blow with Stick Killed Father,” Shreveport Times (6 October 1918), p. 12, col. 1.

[19] “Coushatta News,” Shreveport Times (23 June 1900), p. 2, col. 2.

[20] T.J. Cox, “James McHenry ‘Mac’ Wren,” in Red River Parish: Our Heritage, p. 566.

[21] Ted Tunnell, Edge of the Sword: The Ordeal of Carpetbagger Marshall H. Twitchell in the Civil War and Reconstruction (Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2001). 

[22] Ricky Lee and Annette Pierce Sherrod, Plain Folk, Planters, and the Complexities of Southern Society (Nacogdoches: Stephen F. Austin Univ. Press, 2014), pp. 294-302.

2 thoughts on “Children of Dennis Lindsey (1794-1836) and Jane Brooks: Frances Rebecca Lindsey Kellogg (1831-1916) — Children of Samuel Hiram Kellogg and Frances Rebecca Lindsey

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