The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)

Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 2
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)

Or, Subtitled: Land Grants and Payments for “Sarvis Done”

From the Revolution to the End of William Lindsey’s Life

We ended the previous posting, the second in our three-part series about the life of William Lindsey (abt. 1733 – abt. 1806), son of Dennis Lindsey the immigrant, noting that he acquired a 200-acre land grant on 9 November 1774 in what would become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The land was on a branch of the Tyger River that was almost certainly Jamey’s Creek, and a number of indicators suggest that this land may have been between that creek and Ferguson’s creek near what would eventually become Woodruff, South Carolina.

It seems that William Lindsey lived on this piece of land from 1774 to the end of his life, with his sons living near him. Spartanburg County land records show that neighbors of William and his sons included members of the Woodruff and Bruton families, and the family of David Dinsmore, which had settled on Jamey’s Creek following the immigration of David and his wife Margaret from Ulster to South Carolina in December 1767. On Robert Mills’ 1825 map of Spartanburg County featured in the previous posting linked at the start of this paragraph, note Woodruff’s tavern (the site of present-day Woodruff, South Carolina) just south and west of where Jamey’s Creek begins, and just north of there, Bruton’s mill on Ferguson’s Creek.[1]

We know from documents in the South Carolina Revolutionary audited account files of William Lindsey and his son Dennis that, after Charleston fell to the British in May 1780, he and Dennis both served in a regiment raised by Benjamin Roebuck in what would become Spartanburg County.[2] William Lindsey’s Revolutionary audited account file has an account dated 27 June 1785 stating that he had been paid £3 2s 10d for militia duty as a private since the reduction of Charleston. Attached to the account is a receipt dated 20 May 1789 and signed by Dennis Lindsey showing him acknowledging receipt of this payment on behalf of William Lindsey.

Lindsey, William, Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 3
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)
Lindsey, William, Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 1
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)
Lindsey, William, Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 1 copy
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)

A 7 May 1789 note of William Lindsey in his Revolutionary account file states,

To the Gentlemen Treasurers of So. Carolina

Pleas to Deliver the Whole of My indent with The intrust Due thereon to Denes Lindsey for Militia Duty Done in Colo. Robucks Reigt. from May 7th 1789.

Lindsay, Dennis, Rev. SC Records 1 copy
Dennis Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4591) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 114)

Dennis Lindsey’s audited account file has documents showing him serving in the militia regiment of Benjamin Roebuck as well. A 24 October 1785 note from Dennis in the file reads as follows:

State of South Carolina ninety six District

Jentelmen of the publick Treasury please to pay my hole account of Indent to my Father William Lindsey and his Receet shall be good for the same from me Sarvis Done in Col. Robucks Ridgment. October ye 24th Day 1785.

Lindsay, Dennis, Rev. SC Records 1 copy 2
Dennis Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4591) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 114)
Lindsay, Dennis, Rev. SC Records 4 copy
Dennis Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4591) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 114)

The note has appended to it an annotation, “Rec’d. Wm. Lindsay his father.” A receipt in the file dated 22 June 1785 (the date on which the indent was issued) states that William Lindsey had collected his son Dennis’ full pay for his service; the indent to Dennis was for £7 5s 8½d. A 4 November 1785 receipt of William Lindsey in Dennis Lindsey’s account file also states that William had received 10 shillings and 2 pence interest on his son’s indent.

In his Revolutionary pension application George Bruton, a neighbor of William and Dennis Lindsey to whom Dennis apparently died indebted (I’ll provide more information on this when we look at Dennis’ life), states in a 25 September 1832 affidavit in Wayne County, Kentucky, that he served in Col. Benjamin Roebuck’s militia unit in Spartanburg County, volunteering in the fall or winter of 1780 just after the battle of Kings Mountain in October.[3] Bruton’s affidavit also states that Benjamin Roebuck organized the militia unit at the farm of his brother George Robuck/Roebuck in Spartanburg County, and that Roebuck’s militia served at the siege of Augusta (May 1781) and in actions against the Cherokees after this.[4] At the same time that Benjamin Roebuck was gathering a militia to serve the American cause in late 1780, another resident of what would become Spartanburg County, Zachariah/Zacharias Gibbs, was organizing a Loyalist militia in in which David Dinsmore, whose daughter Mary Jane married William Lindsey’s grandson Mark Lindsey, enlisted.

Benjamin Roebuck’s brother George also filed a pension application.[5] In a deposition in this file dated 29 September 1832, given in Spartanburg District, South Carolina, George (who used the spelling Robuck) says that he assisted Colonel Robuck (that is, his brother Benjamin) in guarding prisoners in Orangeburg, South Carolina, in 1781. George Robuck’s affidavit states that he was born in Orange County, Virginia, on 15 March 1757 and initially served under Captain Dickson in Orange County, North Carolina, before joining his brother Benjamin in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As I have noted previously, Benjamin and George were nephews of the John Robuck who, with his son James, witnessed the August 1762 will of Dennis Lindsey, father of William, in Granville County, North Carolina. Benjamin Roebuck was born in Orange County, Virginia, about 1755, and died in 1787 as a result of injuries or illness following his Revolutionary service, in which he was captured and imprisoned for a period of time.[6]

Benjamin Roebuck’s militia unit also served at the battle of Cowpens just to the northeast of Spartanburg County in January 1781, with Roebuck serving under the command of Col. Andrew Pickens of Ninety-Six District.[7] To me, it seems likely that, given the reference in both William and Dennis Lindsey’s Revolutionary audited account files to their serving since the reduction of Charleston, he and his oldest son Dennis joined Benjamin Roebuck’s militia unit in the fall or winter of 1780, along with their neighbor George Bruton, and that they would probably have served in all of these military campaigns in which Roebuck’s Spartan militia is known to have served.

Wm Lindsey SC land grant 1784 p1
25 January 1785 grant, Sugar Creek, Craven County, South Carolina, to William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Land Grants Bk. 4, p. 283
Wm Lindsey SC land grant 1784 p2
1784 plat to William Lindsey, Sugar Creek, Craven County, South Carolina Plat Bk. 19, p. 233, #12253

In 1784 — no other date is given for the survey — William Lindsey had 150 acres platted on both sides of Sugar Creek on the waters of the Fairforest in Craven (later Union) County, South Carolina. A grant for the land was made 21 January 1785. The plat states that the land was bordered north by Hardin and east by Adams, with the grant specifying that these are Henry Hardin and Thomas Adams.[8] This was a grant for Revolutionary service.

On 23 September 1785, William Lindsey sold this 150-acre grant in Union County to Jonathan Pennell of that county for £30. The deed notes that William lived in Spartanburg County, that he had received the land as a grant from the state on 24 January 1784, and that it bordered Henry Hardin (Harden in original) and Thomas Adams. The deed was signed by William Lindsey and witnessed by Peter Pennell and Samuel Coson (mark).[9] At one point this deed refers to Jonathan Pennell as Jonathan Lindsey — a scribal error, obviously. This piece of land and the grant to William Lindsey are described again when Jonathan Pennell sold the land on 27 December 1790 to Zachariah Nance, both of Union County.[10]

The Final Years of William Lindsey’s Life

My remaining records for William Lindsey are sparse, and present the challenge of disentangling William Sr. from a William Jr. in Spartanburg County records who is undoubtedly son of the older William. As we’ll see when we look at the life of the younger William, he seems to have been born between 1760-1770 — apparently closer to the latter year than the former one — and he begins to appear in county records by the 1790s.

Prior to his appearance on the 1790 federal census, I find the following records that appear to pertain to William Sr. and not William Jr., who seems to have married only around 1790, when his father William Sr. is the only William Lindsey listed on the census in Spartanburg County:

  • Spartanburg County court minutes for the 3rd Monday in December 1786 say that in the suit of Mary Berkley vs. William Lindsey, judgment had gone to Mary.[11] I have no further information about this lawsuit.
  • On 22 March 1787, William Lindsey gave security in a suit of Ephraim Reece vs. Nicholas Holly.[12] An account in the estate file of William’s son Dennis dated 14 September 1796 shows Nicholas Holley being paid by Dennis’ estate for unspecified reasons.[13]
  • William Lindsey was a petit juror in Spartanburg County on the 3rd Monday in June 1788.[14]

On the 1790 federal census, William Lindsey is enumerated in Ninety-Six District, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, with a household that has 2 white males over 16, 4 white males under 16, and 1 female.[15] One of the older white males would, of course, be William himself. It’s possible the other white male who is over 16 is William’s son William, who seems, as I’ve just noted, to have married around 1790. If I’m correct that William Sr. had another son John, then that son would perhaps be one of the four males under 16, since he seems to have been born about 1780. If the other three younger men in the household are also sons of William, then it should be noted that I have not discovered any information about them. If I’m correct that William Sr. had a son Dennis born about 1755 and a son John born around 1780, then it seems he may have had more than one wife.

The 1790 census shows William Lindsey listed beside John Woodruff and two houses from Nathaniel Woodruff (both with their surname spelled Woodrough in the original record). Several houses above William Lindsey are Capt. George Robuck and Benjamin Wofford (Wafford in the original). The only one of the men I have identified as sons of William Lindsey enumerated on the 1790 federal census in Spartanburg County is his son Dennis, who is listed next to Thomas Woodruff (Woodrough) and near a number of other Woodruff (Woodrough) and Bruton men.[16]

After 1790, I find an assortment of Spartanburg County records that may pertain to either the older William or his son of the same name, if William Jr. did marry around 1790, as the birthdate of his oldest child suggests:

  • On 14 June 1791, Spartanburg County court minutes say that in the case of John Ward vs. Thomas Hamilton, which had been referred by agreement to the arbitration of Jesse Connell, John Ford, Isham Harrison, and Henry Wells, Esq., judgment would be made at the house of William Lindsey the following Tuesday.[17]
  • A 15 November 1791 deed of Philip Wells of Laurens County to Edward Arnold Jr. of Spartanburg County for 200 acres on the north side of the Enoree states that the land bordered William Lindsey and a gristmill, and that Arnold was then living on the land.[18] Note that a 28 October 1809 deed of John Tate to Daniel McKie, both of Spartanburg County, says that the land Tate was selling to McKie was on both sides of Arnold’s Creek of the Enoree, bordering William Lindsey among others.[19]

Robert Mills’ 1825 map of Spartanburg District[20] shows a small unnamed creek running into the Enoree River at McKee’s Mill not far southeast of Woodruff a few miles south of Jamey’s Creek, and I have wondered if this is Arnold’s Creek. Topographic maps of the area, however, show a creek named Arnold Creek running south to join the Enoree a few miles west of Woodruff just upstream from Wofford’s Shoals. My reading of the 1791 and 1809 deeds is that the land Wells sold Arnold in 1791 bordered the tract William Lindsey had originally patented in 1768 in what became Spartanburg County, and which he sold to Jacob Pennington in 1772. I wonder if, when the 1791 deed speaks of William Lindsey’s land, it’s referring to the tract on the north side of the Enoree that William had originally owned.

I also think William Sr. died by 1806, when the tags Sr. and Jr. drop from Spartanburg County records as they refer to William Lindsey. If a William Lindsey was living on the Enoree in southern Spartanburg County in 1809, that was likely Jr. Various records do seem to place him in that part of the county, somewhat south of where it seems to me his father and brothers Dennis and John lived on Jamey’s Creek.

We’ll see when we look at records pertaining to William Sr.’s son Dennis that it appears he may have had a son Isaac Lindsey who married Mary, a daughter of the John Tate who sold the land on Arnold’s Creek bordering William Lindsey in 1809. Spartanburg court minutes and legal judgments indicate that in 1802, there was litigation between Daniel McKie and Edward Arnold, involving John Tate. The litigation involved a promissory note of Arnold had made to Tate that had come into the hands of McKie. Arnold had not made good on his debt, and court found in favor of McKie.[21]

A Rachel Arnold appears in the Spartanburg County estate records of Dennis Lindsey, as a buyer at his estate sale in May 1795 and in account of those paying the estate in April 1796).

  • Spartanburg County court minutes for 11 September 1792 state say that a road was to be laid from where Pinckney courthouse road crossed the county line between Spartanburg and Union Counties, following the straightest course to the Washington courthouse. The road was to run from Tyger River to opposite William Lindsey, with Nathaniel Woodruff Jr. overseeing that portion of the road, and then from opposite William Lindsey to the Enoree, with William Hendrix overseeing that section of the road.
  • A 28 October 1793 deed of Thomas Childress to Thomas House, both of Spartanburg County, for 270 states that the land was bordered on the south by the Enoree, on the east by John Hamby, and on the west by “land surveyed in the name of William Lindsey but now calld Spurgeans Land.”[22] This confirms that the 300 acres William Lindsey claimed in July 1768 in what became Spartanburg County was directly on the north side of the Enoree.
  • On 12 June 1794, William Lindsey was a petit juror in Spartanburg County.[23]
  • On 24 August 1794, Thomas Holden deeded to Isaac Hamby, both of Laurens County, South Carolina, 300 acres on the north side of the Enoree, noting that the land was a tract granted to William Lindsey, who sold to Jacob Pennington, who sold to John Spurgin, descending by inheritance to his son William Spurgin, who sold to John Holden.[24] This is the 300-acre grant William Lindsey received on the Enoree in 1769 (with a precept dated 5 July 1768). As this deed indicates, after he sold the land in 1772 to Jacob Pennington, it passed through the hands of John and William Spurgin and then to John Holden.
  • Jacob Pennington appears twice in Spartanburg County records, in October 1785, when Benjamin Brown of Burke County, Georgia, sold to Henry Hamilton of Ninety-Six District 400 acres on the north side of Enoree bordering Jacob Pennington, with John Lindsey among the witnesses; and on 18 October 1785, when a deed of Benjamin Brown to Mary Hannah was again witnessed by John Lindsey.[25] This John Lindsey is, in my view, a John Lindsey of Laurens County, South Carolina, who is part of the Lindsey group classified as group 2 in the International Lindsay Surname DNA Project. As I have indicated previously, Susan Grabek, administrator of group 2, tells me that this set of Lindseys connect to the Pennington family from which Jacob Pennington comes.[26]
  • A sale account returned on 19 February 1796 in the estate file of William Lindsey’s son Dennis shows that William bought a teapot and cups and saucers from his son’s estate.[27]
  • On 3 October 1797, William Pennington Spurgin and wife Margaret sold to Thomas Holden, all of Laurens County, for £110 pounds 300 acres on the north side of the Enoree, noting that the land had been a grant to William Lindsey, who sold to Jacob Pennington, who sold to John Spurgin, who gave the land by inheritance to son William P. Spurgin.[28] The deed states that the land adjoined a tract surveyed for Robert Bailey then in possession of Thomas Holden, bounded on the river by the south and vacant lands on all other sides.

This 300-acre tract patented in 1768 by William Lindsey is then mentioned again in a 3 November 1800 deed of Isaac Hamby to Henry Earnest, both of Spartanburg County; the deed notes that the land was out of a grant to William Lindsey on 7 March 1769.[29]

By 1835, William Lindsey’s 300-acre tract on the Enoree was back in the hands of the Lindsey family. On 22 September 1837, Dennis and Mark Lindsey, sons of William Lindsey Jr., sold to their brother Isaac 500 acres north of the Enoree, stating that 300 of the acres had been granted to William Lindsey on 7 March 1769. This deed specifically states that the land being sold included 300 acres granted to William Lindsey Sr. by grant dated 7 March 1869 [sic], adjoining Robert Bailey and the Enoree on the south.[30] The deed does not state how this land came into possession of Dennis and Mark Lindsey.

A 5 October 1835 deed by William Lindsey and wife Rachel, along with Rachel’s mother Margaret Earnest, shows the three deeding 500 acres on the north side of the Enoree to Dennis and Mark Lindsey. The deed states that in his lifetime, Henry Earnest, their grandfather, intended to give Dennis and Mark the tract of land on which Margaret Earnest was living in 1835, along with daughter Rachel and son-in-law William Lindsey.   It was bounded by Jesse Wofford (east), Brinkley Cliften (north), Thomas Garret, Jonathan Cooper, Isaac Wofford, and Joseph Cooper.[31]

The 500 acres William and Rachel Lindsey and Margaret Earnest deeded to Dennis and Mark Lindsey in October 1835 included the original 300-acre patent of William Lindsey Sr. on the Enoree, which had come into Henry Earnest’s hands when Isaac Hamby sold the 300 acres to Henry Earnest on 3 November 1800, with the deed noting that the land had been granted to William Lindsey on 7 March 1769 and that it bordered the Enoree and Bailey on the south.[32] The 1835 deed to Dennis and Mark Lindsey was part of the settling of the estate of Henry Earnest, who died in April or May 1834. In this curious and circuitous way, the land William Lindsey had claimed on the Enoree in 1768 returned to his family through the estate of William Lindsey Jr.’s father-in-law Henry Earnest.

  • A 20 October 1798 deed of Stephen and Mary Wilson of Pinckney District to son Ruben Wilson says that the 100 acres the Wilsons were deeding their son was on the south side of the Tyger bordering William Lindsey on the south and the Tyger on the north. The deed also states that a Methodist meeting house was on the north side of the land.[33] I have not been able to find information about this Methodist church. The 1825 Mills’ map shows a chapel just south of where Jamey’s Creek meets Tyger River near Wofford’s mill.[34] Could that be the meeting house referenced by this 1798 deed?
  • The 1800 federal census enumerates two William Lindseys. The older of these seems to be a William whose household contains a male aged 45+, along with a male under 10 years and a male 16-26, as well as a female 16-26 and a female 45+.[35] I believe this William is William Sr., who is enumerated near William Moore, John and Samuel Woodruff, and various Bruton men. John Woodruff and William Moore are beside this William Lindsey on the 1790 census. The older male and female would be William Lindsey Sr. and his wife, I think. I do not have proof positive of who the younger household members are, but if I were to hazard a guess, they are William’s grandson Mark, son of Dennis Lindsey, who had died in late 1794 or early 1795, Mark’s wife Mary Jane Dinsmore Lindsey, and their young son Dennis Lindsey, who was born in 1794. In the fall of 1800, this family had moved to Wayne County, Kentucky, with Mary Jane’s mother Margaret Dinsmore and Mary Jane’s brother John.
  • The other William Lindsey in Spartanburg County in 1800 appears to be aged 26-44, and is evidently William Lindsey Jr. I’ll discuss this 1800 census listing for his family when we look at documents pertaining to that William Lindsey.[36]
  • A grant to Nathaniel Wofford for 392 acres in Spartanburg County on 4 November 1801, shows the land, which is on Ferguson’s Creek of the Tyger, is bounded by William Hendrix, William Lindsey, Henry Earnest, James Wofford, and William Roads. If this is not William Sr., then it is probably his son William, who married Henry Earnest’s daughter Rachel.[37]
  • A William Lindsey who might be either William Sr. or Jr. appears in Spartanburg County Court of Common Please records on 25 December 1804, being sued by Robert Caldwell. The abstract book for this case notes that judgment was given in March 1805, apparently for a debt of $30.50 owed by William Lindsey.[38]

By 1810, only one William Lindsey appears on the federal census in Spartanburg County. That William is clearly the son of William Lindsey Sr., who evidently died in Spartanburg County between 1800-1810. I have not found an estate record for William Lindsey Sr. As noted previously, I estimate his death around 1806 since that’s the year in which I notice references to William Sr. and Jr. dropping from Spartanburg County records.

Some brief notes on William Lindsays/Lindseys who begin appearing in South Carolina records when the William who settled in what became Spartanburg County also first appears in South Carolina records — I offer these because these other William Lindsays/Lindseys have gotten confused with the William Lindsey of Spartanburg County:

➤ On 6 March 1764, a precept for 100 acres on the Santee River was issued to William Lindsey.[39] The survey for the Santee land is dated 19 March 1764.[40] This shows that the 100 acres lay on Lynches Lake, with the “lake” (which actually appears to be more of a creek) running through the tract, and vacant land on all sides. Hugh Thomson surveyed the land. A memorial for this land was filed 7 July 1768.[41] This says that the land lay in Craven County, and had been certified 3 February 1768 and granted 19 April 1768.[42]

On 15 December 1783, a Jane Gibbes filed a Loyalist claim about this property, stating that her first husband had been William Lindsay, with whom she went to South Carolina in 1763, the couple setting in Georgetown District on Lynch’s Lake, where he died in 1772 owning 100 acres. She indicates that William Lindsay died testate with a will leaving the land to his son Thomas.[43]

➤ A William Lindsay was administrator of the estate of Richard Johns(t)on in Craven County, South Carolina, 12 December 1771.[44] The estate documents note that William Lindsay had provided care for Johnston during his illness. This may be the William Lindsay who left a will in Charleston dated 20 June 1786. This William Lindsay seems to have been from Colverd near Dumfries, Scotland, per his will and that of Robert Lindsey of Charleston and County Middlesex, England. Neither of these two William Lindsays is in any way related to the William Lindsey who settled in 1768 in what became Spartanburg County, South Carolina.

[1] Robert Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina,” from Mills’ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1825); in the Library of Congress, call number G3913.S7 1820.M5, and digitized at the LOC website.

[2] William Lindsey (Lindsay), Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479); and Dennis Lindsey (Lindsay), Account Audited (File No. 4591) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 114). The original files are at the South Carolina Archives and have now been digitized.

[3] Revolutionary pension file of George Bruton, S30891. According to J. B. O. Landrum, Benjamin Roebuck was a first lieutenant in a company headed by Captain William Smith until the fall of Charleston in May 1780, at which point Roebuck was advanced in rank: see History of Spartanburg County: Embracing an Account of Many Important Events, and Biographical Sketches of Statesmen, Divines and Other Public Men(Atlanta: Franklin, 1900), p. 206; and Landrum, Colonial and Revolutionary History of Upper South Carolina (Greenville, SC: Shannon, 1897), p. 190.

[4] Deeds that Joseph Powers and wife Rachel made on 4-5 September 1787 to Edward Smith and James Crowther state that the land they were selling lay on the north side of the Tyger River three miles above Blackstock’s Ford, and that the land joined land of the estate of Col. Benjamin Roebuck (Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. B, pp. 13-15). This is the location in which Benjamin’s father Benjamin Sr. is known to have settled when he arrived in 1777 in the region that later became Spartanburg County. Benjamin Roebuck also died owning 350 acres on Two-Mile Creek of the Enoree, which his brother George, as heir of Benjamin, and George’s wife Lavina (Bobo) sold on 8 April 1790 to George’s father-in-law Sampson Bobo (Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. D, pp. 356-7).

[5] Revolutionary pension file of George Robuck, S9467.

[6] Lyman C. Draper, King’s Mountain and Its Heroes: History of the Battle of King’s Mountain, October 7th, 1780, and the Events Which Led to It (Cincinnati: Peter G. Thompson, 1881), p. 470. Draper erroneously states that Benjamin Roebuck died in 1788. For two 4-5 September 1787 deeds indicating he had died by that date, see supra, #4.

[7] See Lawrence E. Babits, A Devil of a Whipping: The Battle of Cowpens (Chapel Hill: Univ. of North Carolina Press, 2000), p. 36; and William R. Reynolds, Jr., Andrew Pickens: South Carolina Patriot in the Revolutionary War (Jefferson, NC: McFarland 2012), p. 250. See also Landrum, History of Spartanburg County, p. 218.

[8] South Carolina Plat Bk. 19, p. 233, #12253; South Carolina Land Grants Bk. 4, p. 283. Neither a precept nor a memorial was made for this grant

[9] Union County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. A, pp. 497-8.

[10] Ibid., pp. 401-2.

[11] Brent H. Holcomb, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Minutes of County Court 1785-1799 (Easley, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1980), p. 29.

[12] Ibid., p. 46.

[13] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose papers estate files #1111.

[14] Holcomb, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Minutes of County Court, p. 69.

[15] 1790 census, Ninety-Six District, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 18.

[16] Ibid., p. 20.

[17] Holcomb, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Minutes of County Court, p. 155.

[18] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. C, pp. 262-3.

[19] Ibid., Deed Bk. O, pp. 142-3.

[20] Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina.” The index to Albert Bruce Pruitt’s abstracts of Spartanburg County deeds, 1785-1827, indicates that the reference to Arnold’s Creek in the 1809 deed of John Tate to Daniel McKie is the sole reference to such a creek found in Spartanburg County deed books of that period: see Pruitt, abst., Spartanburg County/District, South Carolina, Deed Abstracts Books A-T, 1785-1827 (Easley, SC: Southern Historical Press, 1988), unpaginated index following p. 793.

[21] See Spartanburg County Court Order Bk. A, p. 75, March term 1802, and Spartanburg County Cross Index to Judgments, #1, both in “Spartanburg County Court Records,” The Arnold Family Association of the South 2,2 (November 1971), pp. 89-90.

[22] Spartanburg County, South Carolina. DB D, pp. 448-450.

[23] Holcomb, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Minutes of County Court, p. 198.

[24] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. F, pp. 414-5.

[25] Ibid., Bk. A, pp. 159-161, 172-4. Note that this deed is dated after Holden sold the 300 acres in 1794 to Isaac Hamby (see supra, #23). These two deeds are recorded in sequence in Deed Bk. A. It seems likely to me that the 1797 deed of William Pennington Spurgin and wife Margaret was filed to clear the title of the land Thomas Holden had sold to Hamby in 1794.

[26] See also “The Lindseys of Laurens County, South Carolina ca. 1774 – 1800,” at Susan Grabek’s Lindsay Surname DNA Project Group 2 website.

[27] Estate of Dennis Lindsey, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, loose papers estate files #1111.

[28] Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. F, pp. 414-5.

[29] Ibid., Bk. N, pp. 191-2.

[30] Ibid., Bk. W, pp. 432-4.

[31] ibid., Bk. V, pp. 565-6.

[32] Ibid., Bk. N, pp. 191-2.

[33] Ibid., Bk. F, pp. 170-1.

[34] Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina.”

[35] 1800 federal census, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, p. 186.

[36] Ibid., p. 184.

[37] South Carolina Commission of Locations, Ninety-Six District, Lands North of Saluda River, Plat Bk. F, p. 115.

[38] See Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Court of Common Pleas, Index to Summary Process Papers 1800-1870 (LDS US/Canada film 1023438).

[39] South Carolina Council Journals for December 1767, p. 51, noting the March 1764 precept.

[40] South Carolina Colonial Plat Bk. 8, p. 495.

[41] South Carolina Memorial Bk. 2, p. 513.

[42] See also South Carolina Royal Grant Bk. 11, p. 313, which also states that the land was on the southwest side of Lynches Lake.

[43] AO 12/46, p. 245.

[44] Charleston, South Carolina, Wills Bk. 13, pp. 974-5, drawer 51.

7 thoughts on “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)

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