The Conundrum of Sorting John Lindseys, Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Latter Half of 1700s and Early 1800s

South Carolina Colonial Plat Bk. 9, p. 1

Or, Subtitled: “’Curiouser and curiouser!’ Cried Alice”

These notes about the challenge of sorting men named John Lindsey in records of Spartanburg County, South Carolina, in the latter part of the 1700s and early part of the 1800s begin with the conundrum of a 20 March 1817 deed of William Lindsey to Spencer Bobo, both of Spartanburg County.[1] I discussed this deed in detail in a previous posting. As that posting notes, William Lindsey deeded to Spencer Bobo 200 acres on which William was then living, stating that he was selling “all the plantation and tract of Land where I now live supposed 200 acres more or less with every appurtenance thereunto belonging N. adjoining said Bobo’s land, E. joining Brewton, S. joining John Lindsey, and W. joining John Crocker.” The witnesses to this deed were John Lindsey and James Brewton/Bruton.

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) (1)

Or, Subtitled: Five John Lindseys Representing Three Distinct Families – Trials and Tribulations of Researching Lindseys in Spartanburg County, South Carollina, in 1700s/1800s

In a lengthy series of postings, I have followed the descendants of a Dennis Lindsey (about 1755 – 1795) who is the known son of a William Lindsey (about 1733 – about 1806) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As the posting I have just linked and postings about Dennis’s father William linked below state, we know that William and Dennis were father and son because records in the South Carolina Revolutionary audited account files of both men state that relationship.

The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Isaac Lindsey (abt. 1776 – 1833)? (1)

Florida Parishes Map, Louisiana Folklife Program
Map showing Florida parishes of Louisiana, from Joel Gardner, “The Florida Parishes: An Overview,” at website of Louisiana Folklife Program

Or, Subtitled: Spartaburg County, South Carolina, Families Head to the Florida Parishes of Louisiana Before War of 1812

The story of Isaac Lindsey illustrates what important genealogical breakthroughs are now possible through DNA research. Until genealogical DNA testing came along, no one (at least, no one of whom I’m aware) had any inkling that the DNA of male descendants of an Isaac Lindsey who died in April 1833 in St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, matched that of known male descendants of William Lindsey (abt. 1733 – abt. 1806) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. Then along came DNA testing and that match became apparent, and it left researchers of the set of Lindseys tagged group 10 in the International Lindsay Surname DNA project with some questions to answer.

Chief among these: who is this Isaac Lindsey who would seem, given DNA findings, to have roots in Spartanburg County, South Carolina, but who is an unattached outlier living in distant St. Helena Parish, Louisiana, in the early 1800s? And how does he fit into the Spartanburg County Lindsey family where DNA findings suggest he somehow fits? Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795): Isaac Lindsey (abt. 1776 – 1833)? (1)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)

Lindsey, William, Account Audited (File No. 4600) Of Claims Growing Out Of The American Revolution 2
William Lindsey (Lindsay), South Carolina Account Audited (File No. 4600) of Claims Growing Out of The American Revolution (indent 479)

Or, Subtitled: Land Grants and Payments for “Sarvis Done”

From the Revolution to the End of William Lindsey’s Life

We ended the previous posting, the second in our three-part series about the life of William Lindsey (abt. 1733 – abt. 1806), son of Dennis Lindsey the immigrant, noting that he acquired a 200-acre land grant on 9 November 1774 in what would become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. The land was on a branch of the Tyger River that was almost certainly Jamey’s Creek, and a number of indicators suggest that this land may have been between that creek and Ferguson’s creek near what would eventually become Woodruff, South Carolina. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (3)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)

Spartanburg County 1825 Mills Atlas Map, Library of Congress
Robert Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina,” from Mills’ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1825); in the Library of Congress, call number G3913.S7 1820.M5, and digitized at the LOC website

Or, Subtitled: A Reminder of How Much We Can Learn from Migration Patterns and Land Records

Settling in South Carolina

By July 1768, William Lindsey was claiming land north of the Enoree River in what would later become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. For those interested in the currents of migration that brought early settlers to Spartanburg County, a good research aid is Frank Scott’s essay entitled “Migrations into Spartanburg Co.” at the SCGenweb site for Spartanburg County. As Scott notes, “After the French and Indian War, the Snow Campaign and a treaty that ceded the Cherokees’ claim to Spartanburg County, the area was finally opened to permanent settlement.” This brought an influx of settlers to the area between 1765-1770. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)

Lindsey, William, 1755 Granville Tax List
1755 Granville County, North Carolina, tax list, entries for Dennis and William Lindsey (original in North Carolina Archives; also on LDS US/Canadian microfilm 1758774, digitized by FamilySearch)

Or, Subtitled: The Challenges Encountered in Tracking “Wm. Lindsey Run Away”

And now to William Lindsey, the one child of Dennis Lindsey about whom I have substantial documentation — if, that is, I’m correct in identifying the William named as a son in Dennis’ will with a William Lindsey who had a precept on 5 July 1768 for 300 acres of land north of the Enoree River in South Carolina. We know from subsequent deeds that I’ll discuss later that this land was in Spartanburg County after the formation of that county, and that William Lindsey lived from the latter part of the 1760s north of the Enoree in southern Spartanburg County (but not on this 300 acres, which he sold in October 1772) until he disappeared from county records in the early 1800s. By 1806, his son William ceases to appear as Jr. in county records, and it seems to me that the father had died by then. I have been unable to locate estate records for the older William that would provide a date of death.

Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Benjamin, Mary, and Winifred Lindsey

Lindsey, Benjamin, Warren Co NC DB 3, 334
Deed of Benjamin Lindsey to Adams Pardue, 4 March 1771, Bute County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 3, p. 334

Or, Subtitled: Minor Children Who Remain Mysteries

As we have gone through the list of the children Dennis Lindsey names in his August 1762 Granville County, North Carolina, will, I’ve now told you what I know of Dennis’ daughter Catherine (married Roger Thornton), Margaret (married Robert Phillips, I’ve concluded), and Elizabeth (married Ephraim Clanton). As I’ve also indicated, I plan to finish this discussion with information about Dennis’ son William, about whom I have a substantial amount of documentation. About Margaret and Elizabeth, I know nothing more than their names from Dennis’ will and their husbands, if I have matched these two daughters to the correct sons-in-law named in Dennis’ will. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Benjamin, Mary, and Winifred Lindsey”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — Notes on Their (Probable) Sons Ephraim Jr. and John

Clanton, David SC Plats Vol. 14 p 89
1770 plat for David Clanton for 350 acres on Little River in Craven (later Kershaw) County, South Carolina, South Carolina Plat Bk. 14, p. 89

Or, Subtitled: Trying to Make Much Hay from a Few Blades of Grass

As I promised in my penultimate posting, I now want to tell you what little I know (or think I know) about Ephraim and Elizabeth Lindsey’s children — and that’s not much at all, to be candid. As the posting I’ve just linked tells you, I haven’t been able to find an estate document for Ephraim naming his children, though the 1790 and 1800 census (discussed in that linked posting) suggest that he may have had a number of children including both sons and daughters. In the absence of estate records naming his heirs, or land, court, and tax records from which we might deduce the names of children, we have to engage in guesswork based on sparse evidence. The partial list of two (or, for some researchers, three) likely sons we can create on the basis of the limited evidence available to us (there’s simply no documentation, insofar as I’ve been able to determine, on which to base deductions about daughters) is pretty certainly incomplete. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — Notes on Their (Probable) Sons Ephraim Jr. and John”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — A McLemore Footnote

Or, Subtitled: How the McLemore Connection Helps Explain Ephraim Clanton’s Link to Dennis Lindsey’s Family

This is a footnote to my previous posting about Elizabeth, daughter of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762) and her husband Ephraim Clanton. In that posting, I showed you that when Ephraim arrived in Granville County, North Carolina, from Surry County, Virginia, soon after his arrival, he purchased 640 acres of land from Young McLemore. I also told you that, before coming of age in Surry in 1757, Ephraim acted as a baptismal sponsor for Harris, son of Levi and Elizabeth Gilliam on 12 April 1756. Also acting as a sponsor at this baptism was Burrell/Burwell Macklemore, a son of John and Faith Macklemore. John Macklemore’s parents were James Macklemore and Fortune Gilliam; Burrell/Burwell Macklemore himself married a Gilliam — Amy Gilliam. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — A McLemore Footnote”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton

Ephraim Clanton Revolutionary Audit File (4)
South Carolina Revolutionary pay indent to Ephraim Clanton, Camden District, 7 July 1786, in South Carolina Revolutionary Audited Accounts, file 1252A

Or, Subtitled: Tracking 18th-Century Families from Surry County, Virginia, to Granville County, North Carolina, to Kershaw County, South Carolina 

I now want to introduce you to another child of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762) — his daughter Elizabeth, who married Ephraim Clanton. Though I’m really introducing you primarily to Ephraim, since I have found no information about Elizabeth beyond her listing as a daughter of Dennis Lindsey in his August 1762 will in Granville County, North Carolina…. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton”