Children of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and Wife Margaret: Sarah Brooks (1771 – 1857) and Husband John Lahue

1. Sally Lahue

2. James Brooks

3. Margaret Day

4. Thomas Brooks

5. Susanna Harland

6. Ruthie Greenwood

7. Robert Brooks

8. Jesse Brooks

9. Rachel Brooks

10. Rebecca Brooks (Rebekah in the will)

11. John Jehu Brooks

I’ve told you previously that though I do not have absolute proof of this, I’m pretty much persuaded that this Thomas Brooks is the man of that name who married Margaret, daughter of John Beamon/Beaumont, in Christ Church parish, Middlesex County, Virginia, on 29 January 1771.[2]

With this posting, I’m now beginning the series I promised in my last posting, in which I’ll provide information about each of the children named in Thomas Brooks’s 1804 will. It’s not clear to me that Thomas’s will names his children in birth order, by the way. The will first makes a stipulation regarding children Rebecca and John Jehu, who may have still been living at home when Thomas made his will and who were, after their mother Margaret died, to inherit equal shares of the third of Thomas’s land and all his moveable property left to Margaret. 

Then the will states that sons James and Robert were to have a share equal to that of the other heirs of the money garnered from the sale of Thomas’s land, if Robert and Jesse “threw in” stipulated amounts of money. The will then goes on to name children Sally Lahue, Thomas Brooks, Margaret Day, Susanna Harland, Ruthie Greenwood and Rachel Brooks, finally naming Jesse Brooks as a son. Jesse and brother Robert were to be executors along with their mother Margaret as executrix.

From various sources beyond the will, there is solid documentation of the birthdates of several of Thomas and Margaret’s children, which I’ll cite as I discuss each of those children and their families. The list I’ve compiled above is my attempt to place the children by birth order, based on the information I have. It should be noted that I have no information about Thomas and Margaret’s children Rachel and John Jehu other than their names in Thomas’s will, though I do have some hints suggesting that John Jehu may have gone to Kentucky with his siblings. The way in which John Jehu is named in the will with his sister Rebecca suggests to me that John and Rebecca were Thomas and Margaret’s two youngest children, as I state above. As we’ll see when I discuss Rebecca, she married Jacob Walters on 11 April 1807 in Hardin County, Kentucky, and the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses both indicate she was born in 1786. 

Sarah Brooks and Husband John Lahue

Sarah appears to have been the oldest child of Thomas and Margaret Brooks. She died on 13 February 1857 in Grayson County, Kentucky, with the register of deaths for that county stating that Sally Lahue was aged 86 at her death and died of old age.[3] The death record also states that she was born in Frederick County, Virginia, and was the daughter of Thomas and Margaret Brooks. 

Sarah’s death record places her birth in 1771, then, a date that correlates well with the marriage of Thomas Brooks to Margaret Beamon/Beaumont in January 1771 and, in my view, strengthens the conclusion that the Thomas Brooks marrying Margaret Beamon in Christ church parish in Middlesex County, Virginia, on 29 January 1771 is the son of Mary Brooks of Frederick County, Virginia, who then moved to Wythe County and died there in 1805.

The only other document I’ve found pointing to a birth year for Sarah is her listing on the 1850 federal census, where she’s enumerated in the household of her son William Lahue in Grayson County, Kentucky, with the census stating that she was aged 81 and born in Virginia.[4] This census document would yield a birth year of 1769 for Sarah. I suspect that the detailed information in her listing in Grayson County’s death register, which accurately states that she was born in Frederick County, Virginia, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Brooks, is more accurate, and that she was born in 1771.

According to a memorial page for Sarah “Sally” Brooks LaHue at the Find a Grave site, Sarah is buried in the Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery in northwest Grayson County, along with her husband John Lahue.[5] This memorial page gives Sarah a birth year of 1769. The page has no tombstone photo and no indication that a tombstone actually exists, and I suspect the 1769 date of birth is relying on the 1850 federal census and that there is not a tombstone stating a year of birth for Sarah.

In naming his daughter as Sally Lahue in his 4 November 1804 will cited above, Thomas Brooks tells us that Sarah Brooks had married John Lahue prior to that date, probably in Wythe County, Virginia, where John’s father William Lehew died testate with a will dated 22 November 1811 and probated 11 February 1812.[6] The will names John Lehew as one of William’s children. John and Sarah Brooks Lahue named their son William. As we’ll see in a moment, William Lahue was born 17 October 1805.  

Will of William Lehew, 5 April 1780, Wythe County, Virginia, Will Bk. 2, p. 20

You’ll see, by the way, from the various documents I’m citing that there are a number of variant spellings of the surname of Sarah’s husband, from Lehugh to Lehew to Lahue and LaHue. Though the Lehew spelling is used in the will of John Lahue’s father William, John himself and his descendants in Kentucky evidently used the Lahue spelling. The family descends from a Peter Lehugh and father Nicholas who are said to have been Huguenot immigranst to Virginia. Peter had a land grant in what’s now Prince William County, Virginia, in 1724. He was residing in Northumberland County at the time and later moved to Frederick County, where he died testate with a will dated 5 April 1780, probated 6 August 1782.[7]

As I stated above, John and Sarah Brooks Lahue’s son, William, whom I’ll discuss in more detail below, was born 17 October 1805. Both the 1850 and 1860 federal censuses show him born in Virginia. In 1806, the Lahue family moved from Wythe County, Virginia, to Ohio County, Kentucky, where John Lahue appears on the tax list in 1807 taxed on 14 March for 50 acres on Cave Creek, and for one white male over 21 and another under 21, along with two horses.[8]  When Grayson County was formed in 1810, the portion of Ohio County in which the Lahues had settled fell into Grayson.

The family of John Lahue appears on the 1810 federal census in Grayson County with a household comprised of a male aged under 10 and a male aged 26-44, as well as two females under 10, a female 26-44, and a female over 45.[9] Sarah’s sisters Susanna with husband Ezekiel Harlan/Harlin and Margaret with husband Joseph Day had moved to Kentucky with the Lahues, and the Ezekiel Harlin family is enumerated two households away from the Lahues, with the Days on the following census page. As I’ve noted in a previous posting, Thomas Brooks’s wife Margaret drops from the Wythe County, Virginia, tax list after 1805; I think she may well have gone to Kentucky with her children and that she may be the elderly female in the Lahue household in 1810.

John Lehew is listed on the 1810 tax list for Grayson County with 50 acres on Cave Creek entered for John Ventress, one white male over 21, and six horses.[10] Listed next to John is his brother Isaac Lehew, who is taxed for 112 acres on Cave Creek. John’s brothers-in-law Joseph Day and Ezekiel Harlin also appear on this tax list, with Joseph taxed for 200 acres on Bozorths Fork and Ezekiel for 150 acres on the waters of Rough River.[11] Also on the 1810 tax list in Grayson County is a John Brooks who has no land listed, and who is taxed for no land, but for one white male over 21, one enslaved person, and a horse.[12] This may well be John Jehu Brooks, son of Thomas and Margaret Brooks, who is possibly also, as we’ll see down the road, a John Brooks found on the Wayne County, Kentucky, tax list in 1802 with 200 acres on Beaver Creek, where Thomas Brooks, son of Thomas and Margaret, lived, and again in 1807 with 150 acres, two enslaved persons, five horses, six studs, and a carriage. He then disappears from Wayne County tax lists.

John Lahew then appears (under this spelling) again in 1811 on the Grayson County tax list, again with 50 acres on Cave Creek.[13] He continues on the tax list in Grayson County up to 1824, when his name drops from the tax lists to be replaced the following year by wife Sarah as head of the household, an indicator that John died in 1823 or 1824. In 1812, when John Lehew is taxed for 50 acres on Cave Creek with one white male 21+ and six horses, his brother-in-law Ezekiel Harlin also appears taxed for land on Cave Creek.[14]

By 1813, John had acquired another 150 acres on Cave Creek. From that year forward up to 1824, when his name disappears from the Grayson County tax list, John is consistently taxed for 200 acres on Cave Creek, with his name now consistently spelled Lahew, and always with a white male 21+ in the household and horses ranging from four to five.[15] Deed records for Grayson County, which had courthouse disasters in 1864 and 1896, apparently begin only with 1896, so I have not found records showing from whom John acquired his Cave Creek land.

Cave Creek is in northwest Grayson County near the Ohio County border. The creek is a tributary of Rough River, which forms part of the northern boundary of Grayson and is today a lake. Grayson and Ohio are in the Western Coal Field section of west-central Kentucky.

John Lahugh is on the 1820 federal census in Grayson County.[16] His household has a male aged 10-15, a male 45+, a female 10-15, and a female 26-44. As James Houston Le Hue and Edith Foster note, when one combines the data for John on the 1810 and 1820 federal censuses, his birth year falls between 1765-1775.[17]

Grayson County, Kentucky, Tax Bk. 1825, p. 13, digitized at the Family Search site

As noted previously, after John Lahue drops from the Grayson tax list in 1824, his wife Sarah begins to appear as household head on the tax list in 1825, so it appears that John died in 1823 or 1824. The 1825 tax list shows Sarah Lahue taxed for 212 acres on Cave Creek with no white males and 3 horses.[18] According to a Find a Grave memorial page for John Lahue created by Thelma Brooks Morgan and maintained by the Tippecanoe County [Indiana] Historical Association Research Library, John is buried in the Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery in Grayson County, apparently with no tombstone extant.[19]

A number of sources state that John and Sarah Lahue’s son William married Elizabeth (or Mary) Litsey in Grayson County, Kentucky, on 6 October 1825. I have not found a source for that marriage date. By 1830, William Lehew was head of a household in Grayson County (with second wife Margaret Sebastian in his household, Elizabeth Litsey having died), and neither John nor Sarah shows up as a household head on the federal census of that year, John having died 1823-4.[20] William’s household has a female aged 60-69, who is evidently his mother Sarah. Sarah continued living in the household of her son William up to the end of her life, and is found on both the 1840 and 1850 federal censuses in his household.[21]

Children of John Lahue and Sarah Brooks

In their book Peter Lehew of Front Royal, Virginia, and Some of His Descendants, James Houston Le Hue and Edith Foster provide helpful information about the family of John Lahue and Sarah Brooks, noting that they are citing the work of Miss Maude LaHue of Leitchfield, Kentucky.[22] Le Hue and Foster rightly link John Lahue to the Lehew family of Wythe and Frederick Counties, Virginia, and also rightly conclude that John was the son of William Lehew, son of Peter, whose 1811 will in Wythe County names his son John.  

James Houston Le Hue and Edith Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, Virginia, and Some of His Descendants (Elburn, Illinois, 1967)

According to Maude LaHue (as cited by Le Hue and Foster), John Lahue and Sarah Brooks had the following children:

1. Mary Lahue who married a Lahue relative from Indiana.

2. Daughter Lahue, whose name is given as Rachel by some researchers.

Tombstone of William Lahue, Find a Grave memorial page for William Lahue, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, Grayson County, Kentucky, created by Pat LaHue Mitchell, tombstone photo by Edd Marks r

3. William Lahue, who was born 17 October 1805 in Virginia (Wythe County), and died 14 August 1863 in Grayson County, Kentucky. He married 1) Elizabeth Litsey (as noted above, various reports give the marriage date as 6 October 1825, without citing a source); and 2) Margaret Sebastian. Both marriages occurred in Grayson County, Kentucky. William is buried in the Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery in Grayson County in which his parents are also said to be buried, with a tombstone giving his dates of birth and death.[23] His wives are also buried in this cemetery. Elizabeth Litsey is said to have been the daughter of John W. or John Abner and Mary Pirtle Litsey, and to have been born 4 May 1806, and to have died 2 March 1828.[24] John’s marriage to Margaret Sebastian took place between that date and 1830. Margaret Sebastian, daughter of William Sebastian and Louisa Strother, was born 12 March 1807 and died 19 September 1860. These dates of birth and death are from her tombstone in the Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery in Grayson County.[25]

William Lehew (abt. 1745-1812)

As noted previously, John Lahue’s father William Lehew died testate in Wythe County, Virginia, with a will dated 22 November 1811 and probated 11 February 1812.[26] As also stated above, the will names John as William’s son. 

On 12 October 1792, William Lehew of Frederick County, Virginia, bought 123 acres on both sides of Reed Creek in Wythe County, Virginia, from Benjamin and Judah Smith.[27] Note that 1792 is the year in which Sarah Brooks’s father Thomas Brooks disappears from the tax list in Frederick County, to appear the following year on the Wythe County tax list. After arriving in Wythe County Thomas settled on Reed Island Creek, in the vicinity of William Lehew.

On 23 February 1797, William Lehew entered 15 acres on both sides of Reed Creek in Wythe County on a 1794 treasury warrant, 1794. The land was on the corner of William Peirce, William Lehew’s corner, and the corners of James Crockett and Charles Baker.[28] This document, too, places William Lehew in the vicinity of Sarah Brooks’s father Thomas, who, as we’ve seen, is mentioned in a June 1803 Wythe County court record regarding a road to be run from Poplar Camp furnace to James Crockett’s furnace, past Thomas Brooks’s house.[29]

Peter Lehugh (abt. 1682-1782)

As stated above, William Lehew’s father Peter Lehugh is said to have been a Huguenot immigrant to Virginia who came with his father Nicholas to Northumberland County, then had a land grant in what’s now Prince William County in 1724. Le Hue and Foster state that Nicholas Lehugh is in Northumberland County records by 1688.[30] According to these researchers, in February 1718/19, Nicholas’s son Peter and wife Mary of Wicomico parish in Northumberland County appealed to administer Nicholas’s estate, stating that he had died intestate.[31]

Peter Lehugh/Lehew was In Frederick County by 1748, per the county court’s order books.[32] As noted above, Peter died in Frederick County with a will dated 5 April 1780, and probated 6 August 1782.[33] James H. Le Hue states that Peter’s will left his heirs land on Happy Creek in what became Front Royal, Virginia, and was originally called Lehewtown after a tavern Peter operated in the community.[34]

I can also be noted that the Hurst family, which connected by marriage to the Whitlock family of Wythe County, Virginia, also had ties to the Lahues. As we’ve seen, Thomas Brooks (1775-1838), son of Thomas and Margaret Brooks, married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Whitlock and Hannah Phillips. Sarah’s sister Mildred Whitlock married William Hurst. William Hurst’s father Absalom Hurst sold 196 acres to Moses Lehew in Shenandoah County, Virginia, on 13 July 1802.[35] Moses was a son of Spencer Lehew, brother to William Lehew, father of John Lahue who married Sarah Brooks. John’s sister Winifred also married a Hurst, Henry Hurst, a cousin of Absalom Hurst, whose son William married Mildred Whitlock.

Another Whitlock-Lehew connection can also be noted: as a previous posting indicates, Charles Whitlock, a son of Thomas Whitlock and Hannah Phillips married Mary Davies, daughter of Henry Davies and Agnes Crockett of Wythe County, Virginia. Mary Davies’s sister Rhoda married David Sayers, and that couple had a daughter Martha (Patsy), who married Isaac Lehew, brother of John Lahue who married Sarah Brooks (on these family connections, see Kegley, cited infra, n. 27, pp. 760-1).


[1] Wythe County, Virginia, Will Bk. 1, pp. 308-9.

[2] See the transcribed parish register in National Society of the Colonial Dames of America, The Parish Register of Christ Church, Middlesex County, Virginia, from 1653 to 1812 (Richmond: William Ellis Jones, 1897), p. 199.

[3] See State Historical Society and the State Archives , Grayson County, Kentucky, Registry of Deaths, 1857 in Kentucky Birth, Marriage, and Death Records, 1852-1910digitized at the Family Search site. The death record is abstracted in Frances Terry Ingmire, Grayson County, Kentucky, Death Records (St. Louis: Ingmire Publications, 1984), p. 23.  

[4] See the 1850 federal census, Grayson County, Kentucky, p. 40B (dwelling/family 537; 7 September). 

[5] See Find a Grave memorial page for Sarah “Sally” Brooks LaHue at the Find a Grave site, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, Grayson County, Kentucky. The page was created by Patty LaHue Mitchell. For information about the Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, see Grayson County, Kentucky, Historical Society, Grayson County, Kentucky, Cemeteries, vol. 1 (Utica, Kentucky: McDowell, 1990), p. 120, which states that the cemetery is off the north side of highway 79 on what was the Scott Bradshaw farm in 1990.

[6] Wythe County, Virginia, Will Bk. 2, p. 20.

[7] Frederick County, Virginia, Will Bk. 4, p. 609; and Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants Bk. A, p. 128. See also Fairfax Harrison, Landmarks of Old Prince William (Richmond: Old Dominion Press, 1929), p. 190; James Houston Le Hue and Edith Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, Virginia, and Some of His Descendants (Elburn, Illinois, 1967); and James H. Le Hue, Genealogy of Le Hew, Le Hue, La Hue, La Hugh, La Hew Family (Boron, California, 1942).

[8] Ohio County, Kentucky Tax List, 1807 (unpaginated), digitized at Family Search site. See also Le Hue and Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, p. 212; and Grayson County’s genealogical society journal The Silent 13,1 (January 1992), pp. 14-15, transcribing a 1992 letter of Charles Craig of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

[9] 1810 federal census, Grayson County, Kentucky, p. 240. 

[10] Grayson County, Kentucky, Tax Bk. 1810, p. 8, digitized at the Family Search site.

[11] Ibid., pp. 4, 7.

[12] Ibid., p. 3.

[13] Ibid., 1811, p. 7.

[14] Ibid., 1812, p. 8.

[15] Ibid., 1813 p. 9; 1814, p. 10; 1815, p. 11; 1816, p. 11; 1818, p. 11; 1819, p. 12; 1820 ditto, p. 12; 1821, p. 13; 1822, p. 13; 1823, p. 18. I do not find John on the tax list in 1817 and again in 1824, before Sarah appears on the tax list the following year in 1825.

[16] 1820 federal census, Grayson County, Kentucky, p. 143.

[17] Le Hue and Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, p. 212.

[18] Grayson County, Kentucky, Tax Bk. 1825, p. 13.

[19] See Find a Grave memorial page for John Lahue, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, Grayson County, Kentucky, for John Lahue created by Thelma Brooks Morgan and maintained by the Tippecanoe County [Indiana] Historical Association Research Library. See also Grayson County Historical Society’s cemetery survey cited supra, n. 5.

[20] 1830 federal census, Grayson County, Kentucky, p. 305.

[21] 1840 federal census, Grayson County, Kentucky, p. 144, with a female 60-69 in the household; for 1850 census, see supra, n. 4.

[22] Le Hue and Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, pp. 212-4.

[23] See Find a Grave memorial page for William Lahue, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, Grayson County, Kentucky, created by Pat LaHue Mitchell, with tombstone photos by Edd Marks and Sue Fetzer.

[24] See Find a Grave memorial page for Elizabeth Litsey Lahue, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, created by VirJean Potter Bozarth and maintained by Nat Woo.

[25] See Find a Grave memorial page for Margaret Sebastian Lahue, Lahue-Bradshaw cemetery, Grayson County, Kentucky, created by Pat LaHue Mitchell, with tombstone photos by Edd Marks and Sue Fetzer.

[26] See supra, n. 6.

[27] Wythe County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 1, pp. 133-4; see Mary B. Kegley, Early Adventurers on the Western Waters, vol. 3 (Marceline, Missouri: Walsworth, 1995), p. 161. According to Le Hue and Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, p. 11, William Lehew leased 71 acres in Frederick County from the Fairfax estates in September 1792, and prior to that, is on the tax list in Dunmore County, Virginia, in 1775.

[28] Wythe County, Virginia, Survey Bk. 1791-1800, p. 321; see Kegley, Early Adventurers, vol. 3, p. 131.

[29] Wythe County, Virginia, Court Order Bk., 15 June 1803, unpaginated. See Kegley, Abstracts of Court Orders of Wythe County, Virginia, vol. 1 (Wytheville: Kegley, 1996), p. 102.

[30] Le Hue and Foster, Peter Lehew of Front Royal, p. 5.

[31] Ibid., p. 6.

[32] Ibid., p. 5.

[33] See supra, n. 7.

[34] Le Hue, Genealogy of Le Hew, Le Hue, La Hue, La Hugh, La Hew Family, p. 4.

[35] Shenandoah County, Virginia, Deed Bk. N, pp. 128-9.

2 thoughts on “Children of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and Wife Margaret: Sarah Brooks (1771 – 1857) and Husband John Lahue

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.