Children of Rebecca Rice (1783 – 1817) and Husband George W. Kiger (1782 – 1849) of Frederick County, Virginia

Tombstone of Emeline Kiger Dalbey, at Find a Grave memorial page of Emeline Dalbey, Pleasant cemetery, Mount Sterling, Madison County, Ohio, maintained by Jean Quentmeyer, with a photo of the tombstone by Dave M. 

Emeline Lucia Kiger and Husbands James Bennett and Joseph Dalbey

George W. Kiger’s daughter Emeline Lucia Kiger — evidently by a spouse prior to Rebecca —was born in 1802, according to her tombstone in Pleasant cemetery, Mount Sterling, Madison County, Ohio, which states that she was in her 70th year when she died 1 January 1873.[1] A number of trees at Ancestry give Emeline a birthdate of 6 November 1802 but cite no source for that date.

On 18 February 1822 in Frederick County, Virginia, Emeline married James Bennett, who seems to have died prior to 1 September 1825 when Emeline married Joseph Dalbey in Frederick County.[2] The 1870 federal census shows Joseph and Emeline living at Darby in Pickaway County, Ohio.[3] It seems likely that Emeline died there. Pickaway and Madison Counties, the latter the county in which Emeline and Joseph are buried at Mount Sterling, are adjoining counties. Mount Sterling sits on the county line about 5 miles west of Darby. The tombstone of Joseph Dalbey shows him born 5 May 1793: it states that he was 82 years, 4 months, and 19 days when he died on 24 September 1876.[4]

A biography of Israel S. Dalbey in The History of Madison County, Ohio provides biographical information about Emeline and Joseph Dalbey.[5] This source states that Israel’s parents were Reverend Joseph Dalbey and Emeline L. Kiger, a Virginia native and granddaughter of General Kiger of Revolutionary fame. The biography also indicates that Joseph Dalbey was a Virginian and a captain in the War of 1812 who was educated at Wesleyan University in Delaware, Ohio. The online guide to the previously cited Donn A. Brill Collection at the Ohio Genealogical Society states that Emeline and Joseph were ancestors of Donn A. Brill and that the collection contains photocopies of photos of Emeline and Joseph, the originals of which are now in the Ohio Photograph Collection.[6]

I have found no information anywhere about a General Kiger who served in the Revolution. I do not have any concrete information about George A. Kiger’s father. According to K. Grant at her “Kiger-Madera-Lucas-Wells Tree” at Ancestry, George was the son of an Adam Kiger who was an orphan bound out on 6 April 1774 at age 17 by Frederick County, Virginia, court to Martin Reyle to learn the trade of a tailor.[7] I do find Adam Kiger on the Frederick County tax list as early as 1782, where he’s taxed in Col. Dowdall’s district for one white male poll.

Enlistment record of Edwin Rice Kiger, 19 February 1834, in NARA, Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914: 1832-1835, RG 94, p. 105, digitized at Fold3

Edwin Rice Kiger

Frederick County chancery court records show Edwin Rice Kiger filing suit in 1831, not long after he had come of age, as we’ll see in a moment, to obtain his inheritance from the will of his grandmother Elizabeth Rice. Chancery court minutes for the case state that Edwin (his full name Edwin Rice Kiger is given) was filing suit regarding his legacy from the will of his grandmother Elizabeth Rice. Defendants were his father George W. Kiger, George’s wife Jane Kiger, and Anna Jane’s father Henry Richards. Court minutes state that the defendants failed to answer their subpoena for the case, and the court therefore ruled that they pay $250, his portion of legacy from his grandmother’s will, with interest from 4 March 1817 (Frederick County, Virginia, Chancery Order Bk. 7, p. 82; see also Edwin Rice Kiger vs. George W. Kiger et al, Frederick County, Virginia, Chancery Court 1831-019).

Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger’s first child, Edwin Rice Kiger, was aged 24 when he enlisted in the U.S. Army at Louisville, Kentucky, on 19 February 1834.[8] This record places Edwin’s birth in 1810, then. The enlistment register, which describes Edwin as 5’ 7½” tall with hazel eyes, black hair, and florid complexion, states that he was born in Winchester, Virginia, and was working as a clerk in Louisville at the time of his enlistment. Edwin enlisted for three years under Lieutenant Noland in Noland’s regiment (Company F) of U.S. Dragoons, which had been raised as one of several “frontier ranger” companies under Andrew Jackson to assist in his schemes to remove the native peoples from the eastern states to the west, and in subduing them in the west.

Noland was Charles Fenton Mercer (“Fent”) Noland (1810-1858), a native of Loudoun County, Virginia (adjacent to Frederick County), who was a West Point graduate.[9] Noland fell on hard times after his graduation and was then sent by his family to Arkansas Territory, where he met and befriended Sam Houston and became interested in matters western. In 1834, he went to Louisville to recruit soldiers for his unit of dragoons, and it was then that Edwin Rice Kiger joined Noland’s troops. It’s entirely possible Edwin and Fent knew each other, given their births in the same time frame in contiguous Virginia counties, or had mutual connections in Virginia.

Edwin’s enlistment register record states that he was discharged on 19 February 1837 at Fort Gibson, Arkansas. Fort Gibson is not in Arkansas but is on the Arkansas River in Muskogee County in what is now Oklahoma; Noland spent time there during the 1830s. I can find no other record of Edwin Rice Kiger than this enlistment record (and, of course, his mention in his grandmother’s will), and do not know what became of him after his discharge from service in 1837. I think it’s likely he had gone from Winchester to Louisville because he had family connections there: as we’ve seen, Edwin’s aunt Mary Rice and husband Joshua Wilson lived in Louisville from 1811 to 1817, and following their deaths in the 1820s in Corydon, Indiana, their son-in-law Abijah Bayless, a merchant, returned to Louisville.

George Rice Kiger

Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger’s second child, a son named George Rice Kiger, was born in 1813 in Winchester, Virginia. George’s year of birth is indicated in a 6 April 1847 letter he wrote from Grand Gulf, Mississippi, to General Jones of Washington, D.C., accepting a commission as 2nd lieutenant in the Voltigeurs Company of Grand Gulf during the Mexican-American War (see the letter at the head of this posting). The letter is filed in a collection of letters received by the Office of the Adjutant General in D.C. from 1822-1860, now held by the National Archives.[10] The letter states that George was 34 years old and a native of Virginia.

George had moved from Winchester, Virginia, to Gallatin, Copiah County, Mississippi, by 16 October 1837, when he published an announcement that the Southern Star, a weekly newspaper, was beginning publication in Gallatin with him as its publisher.[11] He appears in 1838 as a major of the 2nd Regiment of the Copiah County militia.[12]

By 26 July 1838, the Mississippi Free Trader of Natchez reports that G.R. Kiger had been elected lieutenant  colonel of the 21st militia at Port Gibson. George had evidently just relocated to Port Gibson some 35 miles west of Gallatin in Claiborne County. Port Gibson lies on the Mississippi River in southwest Mississippi.[13] Later in 1838, on 9 October, Col. George R. Kiger was elected to a committee to draw up resolutions for the Democratic and States Rights meeting at Port Gibson, and was elected a delegate to the state Democratic convention to be held 8 January 1839 in Jackson.[14]

On 1 November 1838, J.E. Pascal and G.R. Kiger made an announcement of the commencement of a newspaper called the Southern Democrat, to be published at Monticello, Mississippi.[15] No documents I’ve found indicate that George moved at any point to Monticello, so this announcement apparently indicates he was a business partner of Pascal in the venture and was not directly publishing the paper.

By 10 January 1840, George was publishing the Port Gibson Correspondent.[16] Later in 1840, notices in newspapers in Jackson and Raymond, Mississippi, show George acting as a secretary at the Democratic state convention in Jackson on 21 September.[17]

On 13 July 1843, George R. Kiger conveyed a lot in Gallatin to the Mississippi railroad company.[18] This may, I suspect, have been his original residence in Mississippi, which he had held onto after he moved to Port Gibson and was now selling.

The Southern Reformer of Jackson reports on 28 June 1845 that George had again been a delegate to the Democratic state convention, representing Claiborne.[19]

Oath of George W. Kiger for service as 2nd lieutenant in Voltigeurs company, Grand Gulf, Mississippi, 13 April 1847, in NARA, Letters Received by the Office of the Adjutant General Main Series 1822-1860, John H. King file, RG 94 M567, digitized at Fold3

As noted above, George Rice Kiger served in the Mexican-American War in the Voltigeurs Company of Grand Gulf, Mississippi. Grand Gulf, now a ghost town, was in Claiborne County on the Mississippi River 10 miles northwest of Port Gibson. George enlisted at Grand Gulf on 2 March 1847, and, as stated above, on 6 April he accepted a commission as a 2nd lieutenant of the company (see the letter at the head of the posting).[20] He gave oath for this commission on 13 April 1847.

On 14 April, the Vicksburg Whig reported that Lieutenant G.R. Kiger would open a station at Vicksburg or Natchez to recruit for the Voltigeur Company.[21] The same day, George published a notice that would appear in the Vicksburg Daily Whig on 22 April stating that, on behalf of the Voltigeurs, he would offer a bounty to recruits who enlisted in the company.[22] On 5 May 1847, the Vicksburg Weekly printed a notice stating that Lieutenant G.R. Kiger had opened a recruiting station at Vicksburg for the Voltigeurs, describing Kiger as a “clever, gentlemanly officer.”[23]

By 10 May 1847, George and other officers of the Voltigeurs had gone to New Orleans en route to Mexico, and by 28 October 1847, they were in Mexico City.[24] George’s service record shows him being honorably discharged from service on 31 August 1848. Heitman’s Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army, my source for the date, does not state a place of discharge.[25] According to “Mexico War Soldiers 1846-1848” at the A Look at Genealogy website, George served under Major General Winfield Scott and Colonel Timothy P. Andrews.[26]   

On 16 January 1849, George was elected Grand Senior Deacon of the Grand Masonic Lodge of Mississippi.[27] A we’ll see in a moment, when George was killed later in 1849, the Grand Lodge would eulogize him and provide a brief account of the circumstances of his death.

On 2 April 1849 at the Democratic convention held in Port Gibson, George was again appointed a delegate to the state Democratic convention.[28] George then attended the state convention on 18 June.[29] Ads in April and June 1849 show him acting as an agent at Port Gibson for the steamer Gen. Worth and the steamship Concordia.[30]

Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, from Its Organization July 27th, 1818 to Include the Communication Held in the Year 1852, Compiled from the “Extracts from the Proceedings” (Jackson: Clarion Steam, 1882), pp. 433, 441-2
Port Gibson [Mississippi] and Correspondent (7 December 1849), p. 3, col. 6

Then in 1849, George died, apparently in tragic circumstances. An account of his death in the proceedings of the Masonic Grand Lodge of Mississippi states that in November 1849, a gun carried by another man discharged accidentally and killed him at Grand Gulf.[31] On 7 December 1849, a tribute to George by the Odd Fellows appeared in the Port Gibson paper Herald and Correspondent, which had been published on 4 December.[32]

George Rice Kiger was 36 at the time of his death. I have found no records indicating that he married or had children.

Mary Elizabeth Kiger and Husband Lawrence Allnutt Dawson

Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger’s third child, a daughter Mary Elizabeth Kiger, was born in October 1814 at Winchester, Virginia. This date of birth is stated on her tombstone in Rockville cemetery, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, which appears to date from not long after her death.[33] The tombstone identifies Mary Elizabeth, wife of Lawrence A. Dawson, as the daughter of G.W. and Rebecca Kiger and states that she was born in Winchester, Virginia. Mary Elizabeth died 31 December 1877, according to her tombstone. The Find a Grave memorial page I’ve just cited indicates (as do other sources) that she died at Rockville.

Tombstone of Mary Elizabeth Kiger and husband Lawrence Allnutt Dawson, at Find a Grave memorial page of Mary Elizabeth Kiger Dawson, Rockville cemetery, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, created by md057, with tombstone photos by Steve Brannan.

On 16 January 1844 at Rockville, Maryland, Mary Elizabeth married Lawrence Allnutt Dawson, son of James Mackall Dawson and Anne Allnutt.[34] Lawrence and Mary Elizabeth have a shared tombstone in the Rockville cemetery. The stone states that Lawrence was born 2 October 1807 and died 8 August 1875.[35] The Find a Grave memorial page I have just cited states that Lawrence was born at Dawsonville in Montgomery County and died at Rockville, and notes that he served in the Maryland legislature in 1837.

A nomination form prepared by Eileen McGuckian in 1984 for the National Register for Historic Places for Rocky Glen Farm and its house built in 1874 has valuable biographical information about Lawrence Allnutt Dawson.[36] McGuckian states,

Lawrence A. Dawson served in the Maryland House of Delegates in the 1837 session which passed the Reform Act, a major step in the democratization of Maryland’s political structure. Politically, he was a Whig, a combination of the “old family” influence with the new planter-merchant-lawyer class just emerging into political power. Later, Dawson became a Republican.

Dawson purchased land from the widow of his law partner, Benjamin Forrest. He married Elizabeth Kiger in 1844 and brought her to live at Rocky Glen where their children were born and raised. They enlarged the original log house on the farm about 1852, and purchased 223 acres of farmland in 1856. Utilizing slave labor, Lawrence farmed his land in addition to practicing law. During the Civil War, he served as Commissioner of the Draft for the Union Army, and was captured by J.E.B. Stuart (whose army encamped on the farm) in June 1863. Along with several other prominent Union sympathizers, Dawson was transported North, but released the following day.

Injured soldiers on both sides were cared for at Rocky Glen following the various troop movements and skirmishes which occurred in the Rockville area during the Civil War. After the war, Dawson turned to farming his increasing acreage and to raising a large family.

In 1874, a major addition was made to the original log and frame dwelling, its gothic style and decoration representative of the Dawson family’s growing prosperity.

Following the deaths of Lawrence in 1875 and Mary in 1877, the children continued to farm the homestead; Mollie, George and John supervised operations until each in turn went west or elsewhere.

A form prepared in 1979 by Eileen McGuckian with Ingeborg Kreig for the same historical nomination states that Lawrence A. Dawson began teaching at Dawsonville at age 16, and after teaching for two years, he came to Rockville to study law and remained there the rest of his life. 

Photo of Rocky Glen farm house, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, at “Rocky Glen Farm / Dawson Farmhouse: Built 1874 Dawson Farm Park — Rockville’s History in Your Backyard” at Historical Markeers Database site, photo provided by Dawson family to Allen C. Browne

Historic markers now stand at the Rocky Glen farmhouse and the farm itself, which is today a park.[37] A webpage for the Rocky Glen farm marker at the Historical Markers Database website has a photo of the Rocky Glen house built in 1874, provided by members of the Dawson family and uploaded to the webpage by Allen C. Browne. Both webpages have biographical information about Lawrence A. Dawson, noting the Dawson family’s staunch Unionist commitment during the Civil War. 

The family’s Union allegiance is also noted by Mary Dawson Gray in her book Living Through History: The Story of an American Family, which recounts oral history transmitted by Mary Elizabeth (Mollie) Dawson Comer, daughter of Lawrence and Mary Elizabeth Kiger Dawson.[38] This source says that though the Dawsons owned enslaved people, Lawrence Dawson opposed secession and cast one of only 50 votes for Lincoln in Montgomery County, becoming very unpopular, with his children then being taunted by schoolmates at Rockville. Gray also recounts in detail the circumstances of Lawrence A. Dawson’s capture by Confederate general J.E.B. Stuart at Rockville on 28 June 1863, and his release the following day (along with other Unionists Stuart apprehended in Rockville).[39]

Daniel Jacob Kiger

Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger’s fourth child, a son named Daniel Jacob Kiger, was born 9 September 1815 at Winchester, Frederick County, Virginia, and died 22 April 1852 at Washington on the Brazos, Washington County, Texas. His dates of birth and death are stated in a death notice published in the Texas State Gazette on 1 May 1852, which will be discussed below.[40] This document states that he was born in Winchester, Virginia, and died in his residence in Washington (i.e., Texas). 

Certification of service of Daniel J. Kiger, 1836-1837, as a 2nd lieutenant of Company J in Texas’s 1st Regiment of P. Volunteers, in audited claim file of Daniel J. Kiger, original in “Republic Claim Files” held by Texas State Library, digitized at Fold3.

According to the obituary notice I have just cited, Daniel came to Texas in 1836, evidently to serve in the Texas Revolution. The obituary states that Daniel served under General Felix Huston, who raised troops in 1835 and 1836 at Natchez.[41] The connection to Huston suggests to me that Daniel had probably moved with his brother George to Mississippi by 1836, and that when Huston began gathering troops at Natchez, which is some 42 miles from Port Gibson, where George settled by 1838, Daniel joined Huston and went to Texas. 

Certificate for Daniel J. Kiger’s service, 1842, with Burleson in Vasquez campaign; uploaded by K. Grant to her “Kiger-Madera-Lucas-Wells Tree” at Ancestry; original may be held in the Texas State Archives collection entitled Texas Adjutant General’s Department Republic of Texas Military Rolls: An Inventory of Adjutant General’s Department Republic of Texas Military Rolls 1835-1846

Daniel served with Huston from 1 October 1836 to 1 October 1837 as a 2nd lieutenant of Company J in Texas’s 1st Regiment of P. Volunteers.[42] He then served again in General Edward Burleson’s Vasquez campaign in 1842 after having married Helen M. Harris in Washington County on 26 November 1839.[43] A certificate Daniel received from the state of Texas on 1 September 1851 for his 1842 service states that he was paid $47.25 for serving with General Burleson in the Vasquez campaign during Woll’s invasion of San Antonio in 1842.[44] Adrián Woll was a French general serving in the Mexican army, who invaded San Antonio in the first part of September 1842. He was then defeated by Texas troops in two battles at Salado Creek and Rio Hondo later in September. According to Joseph Milton Nance, Daniel J. Kiger served as a sergeant major during this military action.[45]

As we saw in the previous posting, Daniel’s father George W. Kiger was with his son at Washington on Brazos when George died at Daniel’s house on 4 August 1849. Daniel followed his father in death three years later on 22 April 1852, as reported in a death notice in the Texas State Gazette on 1 May 1852, which states,[46]

Texas State Gazette (1 May 1852), p. 6, col. 2

[Died] [o]n the 22 ult., at 6 o’clock, a.m., at his residence in Washington, after a short illness, DANIEL JACOB KIGER, in the 37th year of his age. 

The subject of this notice was born in Winchester, Virginia, on the 9th of September, 1815. In 1836 he came to Texas as a volunteer, in general Felix Huston’s regiment, with whom he participated in our struggles for independence. In 1838 he was married to Miss Hellen Harris, with whom he has resided at this place since. He was a devoted friend, an honest man, and a member of the Masonic fraternity. In his death the community have to deplore the loss of an energetic citizen, the Masonic fraternity of a Mason, and his family of a protector. He leaves a wife and two small children to lament his death. He was carried to his last resting place and buried with all the honors of the Masonic order.

John Patrick Kiger

Though a number of sources state that John Patrick Kiger was another child of Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger, there are some problems with this assertion. John P. Kiger’s obituary in the Baltimore Sun and the Evening Star of Washington, D.C., on 10 June 1907 states that he was aged 87 when he died on 9 June 1907 at Catonsville, Montgomery County, Maryland.[47] The obituary places his birth in 1820, then.

In addition, a card in John P. Kiger’s Union Army service file for his service as a captain of Co. K, 2ndregiment West Virginia Infantry (later 5th Cavalry), states that John was 46 when he was mustered out of service on 20 August 1864.[48] This would indicate that John was born in 1818. John’s enlistment card in the same service packet shows him as 40 when he enlisted in 1861 — thus born in 1821.

Frank S. Reader’s History of the Fifth West Virginia Cavalry states that John P. Kiger (whom Reader knew personally, it seems) was born in 1822.[49] On the federal census 1850 census from 1850 to 1880, John P. Kiger reported ages that yield the following years of birth: 1850 census (Parkersburg, Wood County, Virginia), born 1822; 1860 census (Parkersburg, Virginia), born 1822; 1870 census (Parkersburg, now West Virginia), born 1825; 1880 census (Frederick, Maryland), born 1824.

Marker for John Patrick Kiger, Rockville cemetery, Rockville, Montgonery County, Maryland; see Find a Grave memorial page of Capt. John P. Kiger at this cemetery, with photos by Jim Hitchcock and Steve Brannan

An inscription on the tombstone of James Dawson, son of Lawrence A. Dawson and Emeline L. Kiger, in the Rockville cemetery at Rockville in Montgomery County, Maryland, where Lawrence and Emeline are buried, states that Capt. J.P. Kiger was born in 1816 and died in 1903. We know the death year is incorrect, since John’s previously cited obituary states that he died 9 June 1907.

The problem with any year of birth after 1817, of course, is that if the affidavit Anna Jane Richards Kiger gave for George W. Kiger’s War of 1812 service discussed in the previous posting is correct when it states that Rebecca Rice Kiger died in 1817, Rebecca cannot have been the mother of a son born from 1818-1822. It seems certain that John was the son of George W. Kiger, but I’m less certain that he was Rebecca Rice’s son. In her previously cited book Living Through History, Mary Dawson Gray states that John P. Kiger was the favorite uncle of Lawrence A. Dawson and Emeline L. Kiger’s daughter Mary Elizabeth Dawson Comer — but this need not mean, necessarily, that Emeline and John were full siblings.[50]

A bit more about John Patrick Kiger: on 6 August 1849, he married Malinda J. Shanklin at Parkersburg, Wood County, Virginia.[51] Malinda is buried in Holliday cemetery at Parkersburg with a tombstone stating that she died 11 January 1864, aged 33 years, 8 months, and 12 days, and was the wife of J.P. Kiger.[52]

6 January 1862 letter of John Patrick Kiger to General Rosecrans, in NARA, Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Volunteer Organizations During the American Civil War, compiled 1890 – 1912, Documenting the Period 1861–1866 RG 94, digitized at Fold3

As stated above, John served during the Civil War as captain of Co. K, 2nd regiment West Virginia Infantry (later 5th Cavalry).[53] His service papers show him enlisting at Parkersburg in Wood County, Virginia (soon to be West Virginia) on 29 June 1861, aged 40. He resigned from service on 6 January 1862. In his service packet is a letter he sent from Parkersburg on that date to General William Rosecrans stating that his wife was seriously ill and had been for some time and he was resigning to be with her. According to Mary Dawson Gray, “Col. Pat” Kiger raised Company K, organizing it in large part in Parkersburg with Dr. John W. Moss assisting him.[54] John P. Kiger named his son for John W. Moss. 

Frank S. Reader offers the following biography of John P. Kiger in his history of the 5th West Virginia Cavalry:[55]

John P. Kiger was born in ‘Winchester, Va., in 1822. At the age of 21 he made Parkersburg his home, and followed merchant tailoring until the war. He married at the age of 25, at Parkersburg, and had one son and one daughter. He was well educated, took a deep interest in politics and military affairs, and held various offices in the State Militia. He was drill master, for years of the militia in his county, and was considered the best drilled officer in Wood County. His ambition was to be a soldier, for which he seemed to be specially adapted, in personal appearance, courage and skill. The War of the Rebellion afforded the opportunity, and he had the honor of leading Company K to the front. He was well liked by his company, and he took great pride in equipping and drilling the men, bringing them to a high state of efficiency. He resigned in the fall of 1861, on account of the ill health of his wife, and remained with her until her death. He resumed business in Parkersburg until 1875, when he removed to the valley of Virginia, and is now making his home with his son, near Washington, D. C.

A Frederick County, Virginia, chancery court case file dated 1906 shows that John P. Kiger filed suit in Septmeber 1887 against his father’s widow Anna Jane Richards Kiger regarding distribution of 35 acres of land belonging to George W. Kiger’s estate. The case was heard in Frederick chancery court on 17 June 1902. A deposition of John P. Kiger in the case file dated 8 October 1887 stating that he was aged 67, a tailor by profession, residing in Winchester, Virginia. He states that he was a son of George W. Kiger and a half-brother of Thomas W. Kiger, son of George W. Kiger and Anna Jane Richards. In this deposition and other documents in the case file, it’s stated that by the time this case was filed, the only living heirs of George W. Kiger were John P. Kiger, Thomas W. Kiger, and the children of Mary Elizabeth Kiger Dawson. Thomas and the Dawson heirs were defendants along with Anna Jane Kiger (John P. Kiger vs. Anna J. Kiger et al., Frederick County, Virginia, chancery court 1906-029, file 1952; and Frederick County, Chancery Court Order Bk. 20, p. 178).

John P. Kiger vs. Anna J. Kiger et al., Frederick County, Virginia, chancery court 1906-029, file 1952

Included in the case file are obituaries of Anna Jane Richards Kiger and her son by George W. Kiger, Thomas W. Kiger, from undated and unidentified newspapers. They are filed in the file, evidently, to show that both had died prior to the settlement of the case. When a distribution of the proceeds of the land was finally made (it’s not dated), the portions went entirely to Mary Elizabeth Kiger Dawson’s children, with a note that all other heirs had died. The implication of the case, which is never stated outright, is that John P. Kiger was excluded from a share when Anna Jane sold the land and Thomas W. Kiger and the Dawsons were to receive a share.

The obituary of John P. Kiger printed in both the Baltimore Sun and D.C.’s Evening Star on 10 June 1907 states that he had died the previous day of apoplexy at Catonsville, Maryland, aged 87.[56] This says he was survived by son J.W.M. (John William Moss) Kiger, secretary to the Health Department. 

Previously, on 29 December 1897, Baltimore Sun had reported that Col. John P. Kiger, a prominent citizen of Montgomery County, Maryland, who lived with his nephew George C. Dawson near Rockville, had had a stroke that day and was in serious condition.[57]  

And so ends my chronicle of family lines stemming from Elizabeth Brooks, second daughter of Mary Brooks who died in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1787, and Elizabeth’s husband George Rice. I’ll now turn my attention Mary’s daughter Sarah, who seems to have been born 1750-1755, and who married James Asdell/Ashdale. I’ve already chronicled the life of Elizabeth and Sarah’s brother Thomas Brooks (and here, and here), who was born about 1747 and died in 1805 and who is my ancestor. After I finish telling you what I know about Thomas’s siblings and their families, I’ll return to Thomas and follow his family lines down a generation or two.


[1] See Find a Grave memorial page of Emeline Dalbey, Pleasant cemetery, Mount Sterling, Madison County, Ohio, maintained by Jean Quentmeyer, with a photo of the tombstone by Dave M. 

[2] See Jordan Dodd, Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850, available at Ancestry as the database Virginia, U.S., Compiled Marriages, 1740-1850.

[3] See 1870 federal census, Pickaway County, Ohio, Darby, p. 340B (dwelling 257, family 255; 5 August).

[4] See Find a Grave memorial page of Joseph Dalbey, Pleasant cemetery, Mount Sterling, Madison County, Ohio, maintained by Jean Quentmeyer, with a photo of the tombstone by Dave M. 

[5] The History of Madison County, Ohio (Chicago: W.H. Beers, 1883), p. 86

[6] The photocopied photos of Joseph and Emeline Kiger Dalbey are in box 1, folder 1 of the Donn A. Brill Collection, Ohio Genealogical Society. Information about the Donn A. Brill Collection with a guide to its contents is online at the website of Ohio Genealogical Society.

[7] Citing Frederick County, Virginia, Court Order Bk. 16, p. 328.

[8] NARA, Army Register of Enlistments, 1798-1914: 1832-1835, RG 94, p. 105, digitized at Fold3.

[9] See George E. Lankford, “Fent Noland: The Early Years,” The Arkansas Historical Quarterly 64,1 (spring, 2005), pp. 27-47; and Lankford, “Fent Noland (1810–1858),”  Encyclopedia of Arkansas. 

[10] NARA, Letters Received by the Office of the Adjutant General Main Series 1822-1860, John H. King file, RG 94 M567, digitized at Fold3

[11] This announcement appears in Vicksburg Tri-Weekly Sentinel (1 December 1838), p. 1, col. 4.

[12] See Besançon’s Annual Register of the State of Mississippi, for the Year 1838, vol. 1 (Natchez: Besançon 1838), p. 112. This source also notes that George R. Kiger was publishing the Southern Star at Gallatin in Copiah County by 1838 (p. 223). An act of the Mississippi legislature in 1840 (act 187, article 3) shows George R. Kiger paid for services rendered as clerk to the committee on the case of L.A. Besançon: see Weekly Mississippian (Jackson) (27 March 1840), p. 4, col. 3.

[13] Mississippi Free Trader (Natchez) (26 July 1838), p. 2, col. 1.

[14] Weekly Mississippian (Jackson) (2 November 1838), p. 2, col. 4.

[15] Pearl River Banner (Monticello, Mississippi) (8 December 1838), p. 3, col. 4.

[16] See Yazoo City Whig (10 January 1840), p. 1, col. 1. 

[17] See Weekly Mississippian (25 September 1840), p. 3, col. 4; and The Comet (Raymond, Mississippi) (2 October 1840), p. 2, col. 3.

[18] Mississippi Free Trader (26 July 1843), p. 4, col. 5.

[19] Southern Reformer (Jackson) (28 June 1845), p. 3, col. 4.

[20] Francis Bernard Heitman, Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army from Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to March 2, 1903, vol. 1 (Washington, D.C.: Govt. Printing Office, 1903), p. 597; and see supra, n. 30.

[21] Vicksburg Whig (14 April 1847), p. 1, col. 6.

[22] Vicksburg Daily Whig (22 April 1847), p. 3, col. 1.

[23] Vicksburg Weekly (5 May 1847), p. 3, col. 4.

[24] See Vicksburg Daily Whig (15 May 1847) p. 2, col. 1; Vicksburg Weekly Sentinel (19 May 1847), p. 1, col. 3; and Mississippi Free Trader (9 November 1847), p. 1, col. 5.

[25] See supra, n. 20.

[26] “Mexico War Soldiers 1846-1848,” A Look at Genealogy website.

[27] Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, from Its Organization July 27th, 1818 to Include the Communication Held in the Year 1852, Compiled from the “Extracts from the Proceedings” (Jackson: Clarion Steam, 1882), pp. 415-6. See also The Masonic Review, vol. 4 (Cincinnati: Ernst, 1849), p. 252.

[28] Mississippi Free Trader (14 April 1849), p. 1, col. 5.

[29] Mississippi Free Trader (27 June 1849), p. 3, col. 1.

[30] Port Gibson Herald, and Correspondent (11 May 1849), p. 4, col. 2, and (29 June 1849), p. 2, col. 2.

[31] Proceedings of the Grand Lodge of Mississippi, pp. 433, 441-2.

[32] Port Gibson Herald and Correspondent (7 December 1849), p. 3, col. 6.

[33] See Find a Grave memorial page of Mary Elizabeth Kiger Dawson, Rockville cemetery, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, created by md057, with tombstone photos by Steve Brannan.

[34] See Jordan Dodd, Maryland Marriages, 1655-1850, available at Ancestry as a database entitled Maryland, U.S., Compiled Marriages, 1655-1850.

[35] See Find a Grave memorial page of Lawrence Allnutt Dawson, Rockville cemetery, Rockville, Montgomery County, Maryland, created by md057, with tombstone photos by Steve Brannan and Jim Hitchcock.

[36] See National Register of Historic Places Nomination, form submitted by Eileen McGuckian in 1984.

[37] See “Dawson Farm — 1840-1979 Dawson Farm Park — Rockville’s History in Your Own Backyard,” at Historical Markers Database website and “Rocky Glen Farm / Dawson Farmhouse: Built 1874 Dawson Farm Park — Rockville’s History in Your Backyard” at the same website. 

[38] Mary Dawson Gray, Living Through History: The Story of an American Family (Wellesley, Massachusetts: Gray, 2005), pp. 32-42.

[39] For further biographical information about Lawrence A. Dawson and Mary Elizabeth Kiger, see the biography of their son Thomas L. Dawson in Report of the Mid-winter Session and … Annual Meeting of the Maryland State Bar Association, vol. 30 (1925). The biography is in a section providing in proceedings of the state bar association June 1925 (pp. 36-7). Thomas L. Dawson was a judge in Montgomery County.

[40] Texas State Gazette (1 May 1852), p. 6, col. 2.

[41] See Thomas W. Cutrer, “Huston, Felix,” in Handbook of Texas, online at the website of Texas State Historical Association.

[42] See audited claim file of Daniel J. Kiger, original in “Republic Claim Files” held by Texas State Library, digitized at Fold3.

[43] Washington County, Texas, Marriage Bk. 1, p. 4.

[44] The certificate was uploaded by K. Grant to her “Kiger-Madera-Lucas-Wells Tree” at Ancestry. The original may be held in the Texas State Archives collection entitled Texas Adjutant General’s Department Republic of Texas Military Rolls: An Inventory of Adjutant General’s Department Republic of Texas Military Rolls 1835-1846.

[45] See Joseph Milton Nance, Attack and Counterattack: The Texas-Mexican Frontier, 1842 (Austin: Univ. of Texas Press, 2011), p. 445.

[46] See supra, n. 40.

[47] Baltimore Sun (10 June 1907), p. 9, col. 3; and Evening Star (Washington, D.C.), p. 9, col. 6.

[48] NARA, Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Volunteer Organizations During the American Civil War, compiled 1890 – 1912, Documenting the Period 1861–1866 RG 94, digitized at Fold3.

[49] Frank S. Reader, History of the Fifth West Virginia Cavalry (New Brighton, Pennsylvania: Daily News, 1890), pp. 103-4.

[50] Gray, Living Through History, p. 100.

[51] See Jordan R. Dodd, Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850, available at Ancestry as the database Virginia, U.S., Compiled Marriages, 1740-1850.

[52] See Find a Grave memorial page of Malinda J. Shanklin Kiger, Holliday cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, created by Crystal, with a tombstone photo by Crystal.

[53] See supra, n. 47.

[54] Gray, Living Through History, p. 100.

[55] Reader, History of the Fifth West Virginia Cavalry, pp. 103-4.

[56] See supra, n. 48.

[57] “Col. John P. Kiger’s Illness,” Baltimore Sun (29 Dec. 1897), p. 8, col. 2.

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