Children of Rebecca Rice (1783 – 1817) and Husband George W. Kiger (1782 – 1849) of Frederick County, Virginia

Letter of George Rice Kiger accepting commission as 2nd lieutenant, Voltigeurs Company, Grand Gulf, Mississippi, 6 April 1847, in NARA, Letters Received by the Office of the Adjutant General Main Series 1822-1860, John H. King file, RG 94 M567, digitized at Fold3

Or, Subtitled: Frontier Rangers, Mexican-War Soldiers, Texas Revolutionaries, and Loyal Unionists

As the previous posting ends by telling you, Rebecca Rice and George W. Kiger had the following children: Edwin Rice, George Rice, Mary Elizabeth, Daniel Jacob, and perhaps (more on the “perhaps” below) John Patrick, all with surname Kiger. As the posting I’ve just linked also states, George appears to have had a daughter prior to his marriage to Rebecca Rice whose name is given in the will of Rebecca’s mother as Emilia Luca Ried, and who appears in other documents as Emeline Lucia Kiger.

Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Mary Rice (1776/1778 – abt. 1825) and Husband Joshua Wilson (1769 – 1823) (2)

John Clark Bayless, photo uploaded by John Blakemore Sellers to “Rev John Clark Bayless” Find a Grave memorial page, Bayless cemetery, Carter County, Kentucky, created by Marcella Mauk and maintained by Remembrance of Days Past

The previous posting ended its chronicle of Joshua Wilson and Mary Rice’s lives on 13 January 1812 as they relinquished to John Postlethwaite the inn they had leased from him in Lexington, Kentucky, and had managed for eight years. The posting states that at this point, the Wilsons moved from Lexington to Louisville, Kentucky. Robert C. Jobson thinks that they had actually moved to Louisville by 1811, prior to the 13 January 1812 relinquishment of their lease on Postlethwaite’s inn.[1] In his 1983 Filson Club History Quarterly article chronicling the life of Joshua and Mary’s grandson John Clark Bayless, Jobson says that Joshua Wilson first appeared on the scene in Louisville in 1811 as a “wealthy entrepreneur.”[2] According to Jobson, the Wilsons’ soon-to-be son-in-law Abijah Bayless arrived in Louisville the same year when he began a dry-goods mercantile business there.