Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Mary Rice (1776/1778 – abt. 1825) and Husband Joshua Wilson (1769 – 1823) (2)

The Wilsons Move from Lexington to Louisville, Kentucky

In January 1812, Joshua was licensed by the Jefferson County, Kentucky court of ordinary to keep a tavern at his house in Louisville.[3] Joshua appears on the 1812 tax list in Jefferson County taxed for 18,514 acres of land in various places in Kentucky, 15,514 of which acres belonged to the estate of his deceased father-in-law George Rice, according to the tax list.[4] The Wilson notes in the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon, Indiana, cited in the last posting, compute the land for which Joshua is taxed in 1812 in Jefferson County as 28,514 acres, and Jobson computes the acreage as 6,300 acres, but unless I’m mistaken, the tracts listed add up to 18,514 acres.[5]Joshua was also taxed for eleven enslaved persons, three horses, and a billiard table in 1812.

Jefferson County, Kentucky, Tax List 1812, p. 56

As we saw in a previous posting, not long after Joshua and Mary made their move from Lexington to Louisville, on 25 March 1812, Mary’s sister Ruth Roach published an ad that appeared in the Kentucky Gazetton 26 May 1812 in which she advertised for sale her share of 10,000 acres lying on the Ohio River at the mouth of the Big Sandy River.[6] The ad noted that Ruth had acquired the 555½  acres she wanted to sell as an heir of George Rice. It states that interested parties could inquire of Richard Roach (Ruth’s son) at Postlethwaite’s Inn in Lexington or of her at Bardstown. This seems to me to suggest Ruth’s son Richard was either working or lodging (or both) at Postlethwaite’s Inn at this point.

Jefferson County, Kentucky, 1813 tax list, p. 51

In 1813, Joshua was again licensed by Jefferson County court to keep a tavern at his house in Louisville.[7] In the same year, he also appears again on the tax list in Jefferson County taxed for 18,514 acres in Mason, Nelson, Greenup, Green, and Logan Counties, Kentucky, with most of the land belonging to the estate of George Rice.[8] He is taxed for 11 enslaved persons and three horses, and his town lot is valued at $1,200. 

On 3 May 1813, Joshua Wilson of Louisville, Kentucky, bought from John Calhoun of Chambersburg, Franklin County, Pennsylvania, lot #7 in Louisville, with its appurtenances.[9] Calhoun’s son John Calhoun acknowledged the deed on the same day in Louisville and it was recorded.

On 25 August 1813, John Burruss, John Lewis, John P. and Jane Tunstall, Henry W. and Jane Meriwether, and Mary and Sally Meriwether, infants under guardianship of John Burruss, along with Nicholas Meriwether, deeded to Ruth Roach, Mary Wilson, Elizabeth McCormick, John McCormick, George Rice, and Rebecca Rice, heirs of George Rice, a lot in Louisville in conformity with a ruling in Nelson County, Kentucky, circuit court in 1811.[10] The number of the lot is difficult to read — six, I think (see the 1815 deed of Jehu Rice to Joshua Wilson below). Written into the deed above the name of John Lewis and wife in the list of grantors is “Robert Pollard and wife Martha.” That couple is then mentioned again throughout the deed, leading me to think that John Lewis had died and his widow Martha remarried to Robert Pollard. The deed was recorded 3 July 1816 after it had been acknowledged on several different dates by its signatories.

Bond of Abijah Bayless for marriage to Frances Rice Wilson, in Jefferson County, Kentucky, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1810-1814; a digital image is at FamilySearch in its collection Kentucky County Marriages, 1794-1954
Jefferson County, Kentucky, Marriage Bk. 1, p. 77

On 21 September 1813 in Louisville, Joshua and Mary Wilson’s daughter Frances Rice Wilson married Abijah, son of Elias Bayless (1760-1834). Both the listing of the marriage in the county marriage book and a bond Abijah Bayless gave on 21 September for the marriage state that Fanny R. Wilson was the daughter of Joshua Wilson.[11]

After Abijah Bayless married Joshua’s daughter Frances, Joshua and Abijah created the firm of Wilson & Bayless, and, on 4 January 1814, the firm bought from Cuthbert and Nancy Bullitt and Thomas and Diana M. Bullitt, all of Louisville, lots #3 and #5 in Louisville, two choice tracts next to the Ohio River, and built a dwelling, stable, and storehouse on the lots.[12]

On 12 July 1815, Jehu Rice of Jefferson County, Virginia, son of Mary Rice Wilson’s sister Elizabeth, sold to Joshua Wilson of Louisville his sixth share of lots #133 and #6 in Louisville, which Capt. George Rice had purchased from Meriwether.[13] The deed states that John’s mother Elizabeth Rice was an heir of Capt. George Rice, and the property had descended to John through his “unkle Edward [sic — Edmund is correct, not Edward].” Jehu signed the deed and acknowledged it at Winchester, Virginia, on 20 July 1815 and it was recorded on 5 September.

A previous posting tells us that Joshua and Mary Wilson were parties to deeds George Rice’s heirs made on 14-15th and 21st August 1815 to William and Province McCormick, and to a quitclaim deed that Mary and her siblings and their spouses made on 12 August 1816 to Jehu Rice, son of Elizabeth Rice, Mary’s sister.[14] The latter deed tells usthat Joshua and Mary Wilson were living in Louisville when they acknowledged the deed on 12 August. It also states that Jehu Rice had sold two lots in Louisville to Joshua and Mary Wilson by August 1816, which had come to him from his uncle Edmund Rice, brother of Mary Rice Wilson.

On 19 August 1815, Mary Rice Wilson’s sister Ruth Roach of Nelson County, Kentucky, sold to Joshua and Mary Wilson of Louisville her one-sixth share of lot #133 on Market Street in Louisville.[15] The deed states that the lot had been conveyed by George Slaughter and his wife to George Rice, and Ruth had inherited her sixth share as George Rice’s heir. Ruth signed the deed and acknowledged it in Nelson County on 21 August, and it was recorded on 6 September.

On 2 September 1816, James C. Johnston sold to Joshua Wilson, both of Louisville, lot #56 in Louisville on Main and Eleventh Streets. The deed was recorded the following day.[16] On 21 December 1816, Jefferson County sheriff Henry W. Meriwether deeded to Joshua Wilson Hiram W. Moore’s ninth part of a tract of 960 acres in Jefferson County on Pond Creek.[17] The land sale was a result of a Jefferson County circuit court judgment on 12 October 1816.

The Final Move to Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana

According to Robert Jobson, after Indiana entered the Union in December 1816, Wilson & Bayless bought two lots in Corydon in Harrison County, Indiana, for $2,300.[18] Note that Corydon was the capital of Indiana at this point, and had been the territorial capital prior to Indiana statehood.

On 17 February 1817, Joshua and Mary Wilson and Abijah and Frances R. Bayless of Louisville deeded to William S. Thomas of Louisville part of lot #3 on Main Street in Louisville, with its storehouse built by Joshua and belonging to him and Abijah Bayless.[19] All four grantors signed and Mary and Frances relinquished dower rights on 20 February. A subsequent deed made on 17 February shows Thomas signing a promissory note specifying terms and dates of payment.[20]

On 24 March 1817, Thomas Prather, James A. Pearce, and Joshua Headington, acting as commissioners appointed by Jefferson County court, confirmed to Joshua Wilson of Louisville his portion of lot #6 in Louisville fronting on Market Street.[21] The deed shows Elizabeth Rice McCormick’s children having a share of this lot. The apportionment of the lot was in conformity to a court decision in Jefferson County on 14 January 1817.

In July 1817, William Henry Harrison, who was then serving as a U.S. Congressman from Ohio and who would become president of the U.S. in 1841, sold Wilson & Bayless his farm on Blue River in Harrison County, Indiana.[22] The tract of land was 829 acres, for which the firm paid $10,000. The deed states that Joshua was then residing in Corydon in Harrison County, and Abijah was living in Louisville. It also indicates that the land they were purchasing included Big Fish Spring on the Blue River. Following Joshua and Abijah’s purchase of the land, this spring became known as Wilson’s Spring. As the deed indicates, by the point of this land purchase, Joshua had moved his family to Corydon, where he established a store on the southeast corner of Market and Walnut Streets.[23]

Frederick P. Griffin also indicates that Wilson & Bayless bought lot #12 and its improvements on the courthouse square in Corydon from Dennis Pennington in 1817.[24] According to Griffin, George F. Pope began building a log house on the lot prior to 1811, and in that year, he sold the buildings on the lot to Harrison County, which initially used them as its courthouse before a stone courthouse was built elsewhere. The stone courthouse became the first state capitol when Indiana entered the Union in 1816. As construction began on the stone courthouse, the county transferred ownership of lot #12 and its buildings to Dennis Pennington in partial payment for building the stone courthouse, and he then sold the property to Wilson & Bayless in 1817.

On 5 August 1818, Joshua and Mary Wilson and Abijah and Frances Bayless, all of Harrison County, Indiana, deeded to John T. Gray and Levi Tyler of Jefferson County, Kentucky, part of lot #3 in Louisville, with all its appurtenances.[25] All four parties signed with Isaac H. Tyler witnessing. Mary Wilson and Fanny R. Bayless relinquished dower in Harrison County, Indiana, on 3 September 1818. The deed was recorded January 1819.

It’s clear that Joshua Wilson was well-established at Corydon by 22 June 1819, since the Indiana Gazette of 29 June 1819 carries a notice that on 22 June, William Lilly, John Tipton, Daniel Lane, and Joshua Wilson had issued an invitation to James Monroe and Andrew Jackson to attend a public dinner in Corydon.[26] General John Tipton, who had settled in Harrison County, Indiana, in the early 1800s, served with William Henry Harrison at the battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. He was an Indiana state representative 1819-1823 and a U.S. senator from Indiana 1832-9. His family and that of Joshua Wilson were connected by marriage: Tipton’s second wife Matilda Spencer was the daughter of Spier Spencer and Elizabeth Polk, whose daughter Sarah married James E. Wilson, son of Joshua and Mary Rice Wilson.[27] Spier Spencer’s wife Elizabeth was daughter of Captain Charles Polk of Bardstown; Spier and wife Elizabeth ran the Green Leaf Tavern in Corydon before he was killed at Tippecanoe in 1811.

The 1820 federal census lists Joshua Wilson’s family in Harrison County, Indiana.[28] In the household are a male 45+, three males 16-25 with one of those in the 16-18 age range, and one male under ten, along with a female 26-44. There are six enslaved persons in the household. Joshua is enumerated next to Thomas Posey, son of the Indiana governor of the same name. Thomas Posey Jr. (1792-1863) was, as was Joshua, an early merchant in Corydon who was treasurer of Harrison County and a cashier of Corydon Branch of the Bank of Vincennes, and who represented Harrison County in the Indiana legislature. 

The Posey and Wilson families would most likely have known each other prior to their settling in Corydon, since Thomas Posey’s father Governor Thomas Posey (1750-1818) was from Fairfax County in northern Virginia, not far from Frederick County where the Rice family lived. As previous postings have noted, Mary Rice’s father George Rice had various interactions with George Washington, as the family of Thomas Posey (1750-1818) also did. In fact, persistent rumors have maintained that Thomas Posey was an illegitimate son of Washington.[29]

Minutes of Corydon Branch Bank for 27 April 1820 show Joshua sitting on the bank’s board of directors at that date along with John Tipton, Dennis Pennington, and others. A footnote to the bank’s minutes for that date as published in Indiana Governors Messages and Letters identifies Joshua as a merchant of Corydon.[30] Note that the biography of Joshua and Mary’s grandson James E. Wilson, cited previously, indicates that Joshua and Mary Wilson, parents of James’s father George Patrick Rice Wilson, moved their family from Louisville to Corydon in 1820 — though 1817 seems to be the correct date.[31]

On 21 October 1820, Joshua and Mary Wilson of Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana, and Abijah and Frances Bayless of Louisville sold to Thomas Prather part of lot #3 in Louisville.[32] All four parties signed, with Frances signing as Frances R. Bayless. Mary and Frances relinquished dower in Louisville on 28 October and the deed was recorded. 

On 26 October 1821, Joshua and Mary Wilson and Abijah Bayless, all of Corydon, Indiana, sold to John P. Bland part of lot #4 in Louisville.[33] All three vendors signed with no witnesses, and acknowledged the deed on 25 March 1822 at Corydon, with Mary relinquishing dower rights. Note that Frances Wilson Bayless had died by this time.

In 1820, following the death of Frances Wilson Bayless on 17 November, Abijah Bayless moved with their two surviving sons William Barclay Bayless and John Clark Bayless from Louisville to Corydon.[34] When the Commercial Bank of Louisville had been established in 1818, Abijah was a cashier. In 1819, financial panic struck, continuing until 1823, and the bank failed as Abijah continued his mercantile career in Louisville. Robert Jobson indicates that after his move to Corydon, Abijah became an associate justice of Harrison County, Indiana, circuit court in December 1822, holding the position until October 1823.[35]

According to the Vincennes, Indiana, newspaper Western Sun on 12 January 1822, the Corydon Branch bank had $4,053 in specie and $13,897 in notes in circulation at that date. As Logan Esary states in citing this newspaper information, 

On its board are many names well known in early Indiana history: A. Brandon, Dennis Pennington, R. C. Boon, John Depauw, Davis Floyd, Joshua Wilson, John Tipton, Joseph Merrill, James Kirkpatrick, Jordan Vigus, Benjamin Adams.[36]

On 25 August 1822, Joshua and Mary Wilson and Abijah Bayless of Harrison County, Indiana, sold to John Locke Sr. of Jefferson County, Kentucky, part of lot #4 in Louisville.[37] All three parties signed with no witnesses. The three signatories acknowledged the deed at Corydon on 7 October, with Mary relinquishing dower rights, and it was recorded on 8 November.

According to Robert C. Jobson, Joshua Wilson died at Corydon in 1823.[38] Abijah Bayless then returned to Louisville, leaving his son John Clark Bayless in the “loving, dedicated care of his maternal grandmother, Mary Wilson,” according to Jobson.[39]

On 27 August 1823, the Corydon Gazette published the following notice:

NOTICE

In consequence of the decease of one of the late firm of Wilson and Bayless, all persons indebted thereto, are requested to come forward and make immediate payment.

A prompt attention to this notice is earnestly requested.

A. Bayless, of the firm of Wilson and Bayless, Corydon, Aug. 25, 1823.[40]

This announcement tells us that Joshua Wilson died prior to 25 August 1823. The previously cited Wilson notes in the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at state that Joshua is buried in Cedar Hill cemetery at Corydon, with a tombstone no longer standing.

At its session on 16 December 1824, the Kentucky House of Representatives heard a petition from Representative Thruston for an authorization for the sale of part of the real estate belonging to Joshua Wilson’s estate, to permit his heirs to pay his debts.[41] Kentucky Senate minutes for 24 December 1824 say that the House had passed “an act for the benefit of the heirs of Joshua Wilson” and had requested the Senate to concur.[42]

Acts Passed at the First Session of the Thirty-Third General Assembly for the Commonwealth of Kentucky (Frankfort: Kendall, 1825), pp. 140-1

This act was approved 11 January 1825.[43] It states that Joshua was formerly of Jefferson County, Kentucky, and was deceased, leaving a widow and five heirs, two of whom were infants. He died owning tracts of land and town lots in Kentucky. In order to pay the estate’s debts, the widow and heirs were petitioning to sell some of Joshua’s land. The act permitted the circuit court of Jefferson County to authorize the sale of as much land as was necessary to sell to cover the estate’s debts, and also to appoint guardians for the minor children. Note that this legislative act confirms that Mary Rice Wilson was still living in January 1825.

Evidently citing a Bayless family manuscript in Kentucky Historical Society’s holdings, which captures oral memories of members of that family, Robert C. Jobson describes Mary as “a devout woman” whose father George Rice had been an Episcopal vestryman, who inculcated religious devotion in her grandson John Clark Bayless, as well as a fondness for books and penchant for learning.[44] Jobson states that Mary died about 1825 at Corydon.[45] If the information that Joshua Wilson is buried in Corydon’s Cedar Hill cemetery is correct, then I think it’s likely Mary is also buried there.  

I have not found any estate records for Joshua Wilson (or for his wife Mary, though Robert C. Jobson indicates a probate record for Mary is filed in Harrison County, Indiana), and have found no list of his and Mary’s children.[46] Harrison County, Indiana, digitized records are, unfortunately, under lock and key at the Family Search site, and I have been unable to see the probate record for Mary cited by Jobson, though I am trying to obtain a copy as I compose this posting — and I’ll report back if I succeed in that effort.

As noted previously, we know that Joshua and Mary had a daughter Frances Rice Wilson who married Abijah Bayless in Louisville on 21 September 1813. We also know from the previously cited biography of Joshua and Mary’s grandson James E. Wilson that they had, as well, a son George Patrick Rice Wilson who was born in 1802 in Bardstown, Kentucky, and who moved to Corydon, Indiana, by 1820.[47]

As the biography of his son James states, George P.R. Wilson served fifteen or sixteen terms in the Indiana legislature, and was a state senator for one term.[48] George’s tombstone in Cedar Hill cemetery at Corydon states that he was born 22 September 1802 and died 20 October 1856.[49] On 14 October 1829, George married Sarah, daughter of Spier Spencer and Elizabeth Polk, at Corydon. Sarah was born 12 January 1809 at Vincennes in Knox County, Indiana, and died 3 July 1889 at Corydon. She’s buried with her husband George in Cedar Hill cemetery at Corydon.[50]

Abijah Bayless was born 23 January 1790 at Brownsville in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and died 25 June 1846 at Corydon, Indiana. Following Frances Rice Wilson’s death, he married Julia Maria Hay on 17 May 1826 at Jeffersonville, Clark County, Indiana. Abijah’s last son by Frances Wilson, John Clark Bayless (1819-1875), was a Presbyterian minister and evangelist in Kentucky, whose life is chronicled in the Robert C. Jobson article I have been citing.[51] A photo of John Clark Bayless is at the head of this posting/.

Joshua Wilsons Who Have Been Confused with Joshua Who Married Mary Rice

There’s unfortunately a world of misinformation about Joshua Wilson in online and published family trees and in other sources providing genealogical information. The Joshua Wilson who was married to Mary Rice has been lumped together with a man of the same name who married Elizabeth Saphel in Woodford County, Kentucky, on 17 February 1800. We can track the Joshua Wilson with wife Mary in numerous records pertaining to the estate of her father George Rice, and it’s clear that Mary was the mother of the two children I can identify, Frances Rice Wilson and George Patrick Rice Wilson — and that they did not belong to Elizabeth Saphel, despite what many family trees erroneously indicate. The Joshua Wilson with wife Elizabeth in Woodford County, Kentucky, was an entirely different person from Joshua Wilson with wife Mary Rice.

The Joshua Wilson who married Mary Rice has also been conflated with a Joshua Wilson who was an early settler of Clinton and Fayette Counties, Ohio. That Joshua was born in 1763 in Maryland, and died in 1831. He did have a wife Mary, who is buried with him in Sabina cemetery at Sabina, Clinton County, Ohio. She was born in 1781 and died in 1857. A modern tombstone for this Joshua is also found in Walnut Creek cemetery near Martinsburg in Fayette County, Ohio. It states that he was a soldier in the Virginia continental line during the Revolution (though I find no proof that this Joshua was a Revolutionary soldier; he was a soldier in the War of 1812). Joshua died testate in Fayette County, Indiana. His will does not name the son George Patrick Rice Wilson who was, we know from other sources, son of Joshua Wilson with wife Mary Rice.


[1] Robert C. Jobson, “John Clark Bayless, a Kentucky Presbyterian Minister,” Filson Club History Quarterly 57,2 (April 1983), pp. 189.

[2] Ibid.

[3] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Court of Ordinary Minute Bk. 10, p. 93, as cited in ibid. The Wilson family notes from the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon, Indiana, also note this 1812 tavern license to Joshua; these notes, uploaded by Susan Pope Faurot to her Ancestry tree, were cited in the previous posting.

[4] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Tax List 1812, p. 56.

[5] On the Wilson notes, see supra, n. 3. See also Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 189.

[6] Kentucky Gazette (26 May 1812), p. 4, col. 3.

[7] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Court of Ordinary Minute Bk. 10, p. 216, as cited in Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 189.

[8] Jefferson County, Kentucky, 1813 tax list, p. 51.

[9] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 10, pp. 94-7.

[10] Ibid., Bk. K, pp. 176-180. I have scrolled through Nelson County circuit court minutes for 1811 and don’t spot mention of this court ruling.

[11] The marriage is recorded in Jefferson County, Kentucky, Marriage Bk. 1, p. 77. The original bond is in Jefferson County, Kentucky, Marriage Bonds and Licenses 1810-1814; a digital image is at FamilySearch in its collection Kentucky County Marriages, 1794-1954.

[12] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. 10, pp. 404-5. See also Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 189, and Wilson family notes from the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon, Indiana, uploaded by Susan Pope Faurot to her Ancestry tree,

[13] Ibid., Bk. K, pp. 295-7.

[14] Frederick County, Virginia, Deed Bk. 37, pp. 338-345, 431-9; and Bk. 39, pp. 150-5. The latter deed is also recorded in Kentucky Court of Appeals Deed Bk. R, pp. 161f, with an abstract in Hattie M. Scott, “Heirs in Court of Appeals Deeds,” Register of Kentucky State Historical Society42,140 (July 1944), p. 25.

[15] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. K, pp. 294-5.

[16] Ibid., pp. 286-8.

[17] Ibid., Bk. P, pp. 102-4.

[18] Harrison County, Indiana, Deed Bk. B, pp. 9, 73, as cited in Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” pp. 189-190. See also the Wilson notes from the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon, Indiana, cited supra, n. 3.

[19] Ibid., Bk. L, pp. 262-3.

[20] Ibid., pp. 262-5.

[21] Ibid., pp. 302-6.

[22] Harrison County, Indiana, Deed Bk. B, 159. On this deed, see Frederick P. Griffin, Harrison County’s Earliest Years (Corydon, Indiana: O’Bannon, 1984), excerpted and transcribed at the Genealogy History Group Website without page numbers; Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 189; and George S. Cottman, “Editorial and Miscellaneous: The Harrison Farm Near Corydon,” The Indiana Quarterly Magazine of History, vol. 3,4 (December 1907), pp. 197-8.

[23] Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 189; and Wilson notes from the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon, Indiana, cited supra, n. 3. According to William H. Roose, Indiana’s Birthplace: A History of Harrison County, Indiana (New Albany, Indiana: Tribune, 1911), Joshua Wilson kept a store at the southeast corner of Market and Walnut Streets in Corydon for many years (p. 25). Note that since there’s firm evidence Joshua died in 1823, and had arrived in Corydon only in 1817-1820, he cannot have had a store in Corydon for many years.

[24] Frederick P. Griffin, The Streets of Corydon: A Compilation of Notes by the Griffin Family Over the Past Two Hundred Years (priv. publ., Corydon, Indiana, 2007), p. 14. The property is now owned by Jeff and Carrie Ketterman of Corydon, who operate the Old Capitol Tearoom from the house now occupying the lot, which was built in 1916. Their blog Our Technicolor Life has a history of the property stating that Wilson & Bayless bought it from Dennis Pennington, an ancestor of Jeff.

[25] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. P, pp. 400-4.

[26] See Daniel Preston, A Comprehensive Catalogue of the Correspondence and Papers of James Monroe, vol. 2 (Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood, 2001), p. 760.

[27] Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, Indiana, p. 119. See also Find a Grave memorial page for CPT Spier Spencer, Tippecanoe Battlefield Memorial cemetery, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, maintained by A.P. Reed; and “Spier Spencer” at Wikipedia.

[28] 1820 federal census, Harrison County, Indiana, p. 72. The The 1820 federal census for Woodford County, Kentucky, p. 101, shows a household headed by a Joshua Wilson who is aged 45+ with a female who is evidently his wife in the household, who is aged 26-44. Various researchers have stated that this is Joshua Wilson with wife Mary Rice. This is a different Joshua Wilson than Joshua with wife Mary Rice. This Joshua married Elizabeth Safel in 1800, and lived in Woodford County. I will discuss this Joshua in more detail below as I discuss two Joshua Wilsons often confused with the man who married Mary Rice.

1820 federal census, Woodford County, Kentucky, p. 101.

[29] See “To George Washington from Thomas Posey, 20 November 1791,” at the National Archives’ Founders Online website.

[30] Logan Esary, ed., Indiana Governors Messages and Letters, vol. 3:  1816-1825 (Indianapolis: Indiana Historical Commission, 1924), p. 145.

[31] See supra, n. 27.

[32] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. S, pp. 157-8.

[33] Ibid., Bk. U, pp. 273-4.

[34] See Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 190, citing “Bayless Family,” an unpublished handwritten manuscript at Kentucky Historical Society; and notes about the Wilson family from the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy in Corydon, Indiana, cited supra, n. 3.

[35] Jobson, “John Clark Bayless,” p. 190

[36] Logan Esary, “The First Indiana Banks,” The Indiana Quarterly Magazine of History 6,4 (December 1910), p. 156.

[37] Jefferson County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. V, pp. 17-8.

[38] Jobson “John Clark Bayless,” p. 190.

[39] Ibid.

[40] The previously cited Ancestry tree of Susan Pope Faurote has a transcript of this document, noting that it is found in a file in the Frederick Porter Griffin Center for Local History and Genealogy at Corydon. On Susan Pope Faurote’s tree, see supra, n. 3.

[41] Journal of the House of the General Assembly of the Commonwealth of Kentucky (Frankfort: Holeman, 1824), p. 386.

[42] Journal of the Senate of the Commonwealth of Kentucky (Frankfort: Kendall, 1824), p. 309.

[43] Acts Passed at the First Session of the Thirty-Third General Assembly for the Commonwealth of Kentucky (Frankfort: Kendall, 1825), pp. 140-1.

[44] Jobson “John Clark Bayless,” p. 191. On the Bayless family manuscript, see supra, n. 34.

[45] Jobson “John Clark Bayless,” p. 191, citing Harrison County, Indiana, probate box 5.

[46] See supra, n. 45.

[47] Biographical and Historical Souvenir for the Counties of Clark, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Jefferson, Jennings, Scott and Washington, Indiana, p. 119.

[48] Ibid.

[49] Find a Grave memorial page of George Patrick Rice Wilson, Cedar Hill cemetery, Corydon, Harrison County, Indiana, created by senglema with a tombstone photo by senglema.

[50] See Sarah Spencer Wilson’s obituary in the Daily Ledger (New Albany, Indiana) (6 July 1885), p. 4, col. 3.

[51] Jobson “John Clark Bayless,” pp. 188-206. This article is my source for Abijah Bayless’s date and place of birth and his marriage to Julia Maria Hay. See Thérèse Lansdowne Duble, John Clark Bayless, 1819-1875, a Kentucky Evangelist (Louisville: Gateway, 1982); and “Rev John Clark Bayless” Find a Grave memorial page, Bayless cemetery, Carter County, Kentucky, created by Marcella Mauk and maintained by Remembrance of Days Past, with a photo uploaded by John Blakemore Sellers.

2 thoughts on “Children of Elizabeth Brooks (1747/1750 – 1816) and Husband George Rice (abt. 1743 – 1792): Mary Rice (1776/1778 – abt. 1825) and Husband Joshua Wilson (1769 – 1823) (2)

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