Children of Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822) — Samuel Hollingsworth (1768/1770 – 1802) and Wife Mary Garner

As my last posting states, I think it’s likely that Samuel Hollingsworth’s wife Mary Garner was a sister to James Garner who married Samuel’s sister Sarah Hollingsworth, evidently around the same time that Samuel Hollingsworth and Mary Garner married. I do not have proof of this sibling relationship of Mary and James Garner, however. I also think that if they were brother and sister, their father may have been either a John Garner or a James Garner older than the James who married Sarah Hollingsworth, enumerated next to James Garner with wife Sarah Hollingsworth in Randolph County, North Carolina, on the 1790 federal census.[3]

The previous posting also points out that James Garner is taxed in 1805 in Franklin County, Georgia, next to Jacob Hollingsworth (and son Thomas).[4] This tax listing states that Jacob was agent for Samuel Hollingsworth, deceased. In addition, the 1808 tax list for Franklin County shows James Garner enumerated next to Thomas Hollingsworth and Jacob Hollingsworth, Jr., who are listed as agents for Samuel Hollingsworth, deceased.[5] On the basis of these two tax entries, I conclude that James Garner settled next to Samuel Hollingsworth in Franklin County — a living arrangement that reinforces the conclusion that Samuel Hollingsworth likely married James Garner’s sibling Mary Garner: siblings married to siblings lived next to each other.

As also discussed previously, the 15 May 1815 will of Samuel’s father Jacob Hollingsworth in Franklin County, Georgia, indicates that Samuel had predeceased his father.[6] The will states,

[D]uring the lifetime of my beloved son Samuel Hollingsworth I distributed and gave to him as much as intended him to have my worldly goods nevertheleſs in consideration of the great affection that I bear to his memory I will and bequeath to his heirs the following Sum (Viz) To Sally Haynes one dollar, To Mary Robbins one dollar To John Hollingsworth one dollar To Henry Hollingsworth one dollar and to Hannah Hollingsworth one dollar To Jacob James Hollingsworth twenty dollars to be paid to them by my Executors out of my Estate.

17 September 1802 inventory of estate of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes Bk. 1801-1804, pp. 35-7

Samuel Hollingsworth died in Franklin County, Georgia, by 8 August 1802, when Samuel’s widow Mary his father Jacob Hollingsworth were granted letters of administration on Samuel’s estate (see the image at the top of the posting).[7] On 17 September 1802 an inventory of Samuel’s estate was made and recorded in ordinary court minutes.[8] Samuel had appeared on the 1798 tax list in Franklin County taxed for three enslaved persons, and his inventory shows him owning four enslaved persons at the time he died: a man named Demsey, a woman named Suckee (i.e., Sukey, a nickname for Susan), and an unnamed boy aged four and girl aged two.[9] Samuel’s inventory suggests he was a prosperous middle-class farmer of the northeast Georgia frontier at the time of his death, who was likely literate, since he owned a dictionary, a geography book, and three other unnamed books.

30 August 1800 deed of Peter B. Terrell to Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. T, pp. 81-2

Not long before he died in 1802, on 30 August 1800 Samuel had bought from Peter B. Terrell of Wilkes County, Georgia, 500 acres of land in Franklin County on the Grove River.[10] The memorandum of agreement recorded in Franklin County deed books says that the land joined Young, Long, and Walton, and that Samuel Hollingsworth had agreed to pay $250 on 1 March 1801 and $500 within five years of 30 August 1800. Peter Terrell and Samuel Hollingsworth both signed the memorandum, with witnesses John L. Dixon, David Terrell, John Martin, and Burrell Green. The memorandum was not recorded until 10 September 1810, with John Martin giving oath and stating that the copy he was proving was, as far as he knew, a true copy, and that the original could not be entered into record since it had been defaced.

Peter Buford Terrell (1764-1821) was a kinsman of Simon Terrell (1755-1840), whose daughter Amelia married Samuel Hollingsworth’s brother Thomas in Franklin County on 1 November 1808. John Martin is, I’m fairly sure, a relative of Sarah Martin, who married Samuel and Thomas’s brother Jacob in Franklin County around 1801.

A second deed for Peter B. Terrell’s sale of 500 acres to Samuel Hollingworth was recorded in Franklin County on 18 May 1801.[11] This deed states that the 500 acres Peter was selling Samuel were on the south fork of Broad River, and that Samuel had paid $250. The deed was signed by Peter B. Terrell and wife Penelope, with witnesses William Jones, West Harris, and John Graham, and was recorded 14 July 1809. Appended to the deed is the statement, 

This deed was made on account of my being very sick and Executed the same to prevent the trouble of claiming title in Case of my death and this 8th day of April 1809 delivered the same to the administrators of Samuel Hollingsworth dec.d  They have this day made me payment in full.

By the time this second deed was made, Samuel’s widow Mary Garner Hollingsworth had remarried. According to Sadie Greening Sparks, in the loose-papers files of Franklin County’s superior court, there is an October 1805 petition for dower by Samuel’s widow Mary noting that she was widow of Samuel Hollingsworth and now married to Thomas Lenoir (the surname is spelled Linore here).[12] In February 1806, Thomas Lenoir applied for letters of guardianship for Samuel Hollingsworth’s orphans.[13]  

4 January 1808 account of Thomas Lenoir for guardianship of Samuel Hollingsworth’s orphans Hannah and Jacob James Hollingsworth, from loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia
19 April 1816 receipt of John Hollingsworth for payment from Thomas Lenoir, John’s guardianship of Jacob James Hollingsworth, loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia
12 April 1816 receipt of Jacob Hollingsworth for payment from Thomas Lenoir, Jacob’s guardianship of Hannah Hollingsworth, loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia
22 January 1816 receipt of John Hollingsworth for payment from Thomas Lenoir, John’s guardianship of Jacob James Hollingsworth, loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia

In Samuel Hollingsworth’s loose-papers estate file in Franklin County, there is a 4 January 1808 account by Thomas Lenoir for expenses incurred in his guardianship of Samuel’s orphans Hannah and Jacob James Hollingsworth for an unspecified period of time, perhaps the previous year.[14] The estate file also has a receipt from John Hollingsworth as guardian of Jacob James Hollingsworth for a payment by Thomas Lenoir to Jacob James as Samuel’s heirs, and a receipt from Jacob Hollingsworth to Lenoir for a similar payment to Hannah Hollingsworth, both receipts dated 12 April 1816. Another 22 January 1816 receipt from John Hollingsworth to Lenoir acknowledges receipt of another portion of Samuel’s estate paid to Jacob James Hollingsworth.

I think the John Hollingsworth of this guardianship record is John, the older brother of Hannah and Jacob James. He was 24 in 1816 and must have been, I think, acting as guardian for his younger sibling Jacob James Hollingsworth at this point. Jacob Hollingsworth was, I think, Hannah’s uncle Jacob, who moved to Alabama around the time this receipt was issued.

Franklin County deeds show Samuel Hollingsworth’s heirs and other family members who had acquired some of Samuel’s land selling pieces of his 500-acre tract on Grove Fork of Broad River after the land came into their possession.[15] On 13 May 1817, Thomas Hollingsworth and wife Amelia sold to Charles Sisson, all of Franklin County, 250 acres on Grove Fork of Broad River, with the deed noting that the land had been granted to Peter B. Terrell, who sold it to Samuel Hollingsworth, deceased, and his heirs John Haynes and John and Henry Hollingsworth, who conveyed the land to Thomas Hollingsworth. Thomas and Amelia signed the deed with Edmd. Strange and John Gazaway witnessing. Edmund Strange proved the deed on 17 July 1817 and it was recorded.

On 29 May 1817, Charles Sisson and wife Barsheba then sold the 250 acres to David Hensley, with the deed stating that the land was on Grove Fork of Broad River, had been conveyed by Peter B. Terrell to Samuel Hollingsworth, then sold by Samuel’s heirs John Haynes in right of his wife and John and Henry Hollingsworth, who conveyed the land to Thomas Hollingsworth, who sold it to Charles Sisson.[16] This deed was recorded 14 May 1818. 

On 2 March 1818, William Brock and John Hollingsworth sold to Enoch Henslee 166 acres on Grove Fork of Broad River out of 500 acres sold by Peter B. Terrell to Samuel Hollingsworth.[17] The deed states that the land was owned by William Brock in right of his wife Hannah, formerly Hollingsworth, and by John Hollingsworth, and had come to them as heirs of Samuel Hollingsworth. William Brock and John Hollingsworth signed, with witnesses William Robins, Benjamin Henslee, and M.C. Martin. Robins was the brother-in-law of William Brock and John Hollingsworth, the husband of Mary Hollingsworth. Wm. Robins proved the deed 2 May 1818 and it was recorded. 

For further information about the Samuel Hollingsworth and Mary Garner and their family, I recommend Sadie Greening Sparks’s two pieces on Jacob Hollingsworth and son Samuel linked in the first footnote to this posting. Both are full of good, well-documented information about this family. 

Samuel Hollingsworth and Mary Garner had the following children:

1. Sarah Hollingsworth was born about 1789 in Burke County, North Carolina, and had married John Haynes by the time her grandfather Jacob Hollingsworth named her as Sally Haynes in May 1815. I have not been able to find information about Sarah and husband John Haynes other than what is stated above and in the two articles by Sadie Greening Sparks I’ve just recommended. As I’ve noted in previous postings, Mary Brooks Hollingsworth had a sister Susanna named in the 1787 Frederick County, Virginia, will of their mother Mary Brooks as Susanna Haynes. As the posting I’ve just linked tells you, I have not been able to trace Susanna or even to find the given name of her Haynes husband. The fact that Samuel Hollingsworth, son of Mary Brooks Hollingsworth, had a daughter who married John Haynes before 15 May 1815, evidently in Franklin County, Georgia, makes me wonder if Mary’s sister Susanna and her Haynes husband went to Georgia along with Jacob Hollingsworth and Mary Brooks. This is just a question: I have absolutely no information to confirm that the John Haynes who married Sarah Hollingsworth was connected to Susanna Brooks and her Haynes husband.

2. Mary Hollingsworth was born about 1791 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died between 1850 and 1860, probably in Hempstead County, Arkansas. On 28 April 1807 in Franklin County, Georgia, Mary married William Henry Robins. Sadie Greening Sparks thinks that William Henry Robins was born about 1777 in South Carolina and died in 1847 in Murray County, Georgia.[18] The 1850 federal census shows Mary living with her son John Bush Robins in Murray County, evidently as a widow.[19] In 1858, John B. Robins moved to Arkansas along with a number of his siblings, settling in Hempstead County where he’s buried in Zion cemetery, and Sparks thinks it’s likely that Mary went to Arkansas with her son and his family and died and is buried there.[20] The 1860 federal census shows John Bush Robins’s family in Hempstead County, but Mary is not in the household or with other Robins families on this census.

Photo of tombstones of John Hollingsworth and Zilpha Galloway Hollingsworth, Hollingsworth family cemetery, Ford Mountain, Fayette County, Alabama, at Larry E. Whitehead’s “Hollingsworth Family Cemetery” page at his My Family History website

3. John Hollingsworth was born 3 September 1792 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 30 November 1889 in Fayette County, Alabama. On 24 November 1816 in Franklin County, Georgia, John married Matilda White. Following Matilda’s death in 1825 in Fayette County, Alabama, John married Zilpha Galloway, daughter of Thomas Galloway and Jane Beall, on 11 October 1827 in Fayette County. He and Zilpha are buried in the Hollingsworth family cemetery at Ford Mountain in Fayette County, Alabama.[21] As Larry E. Whitehead notes in an essay entitled “John Hollingsworth Family of Fayette County” at his My Family History website, after moving to Fayette County, Alabama, John was a successful farmer in Fayette and became one of the county’s largest landholders.

Tombstones of Henry Hollingsworth and wife Rachel at Find a Grave memorial page of Henry Hollingsworth, Henry Hollingsworth burying ground, Holley Crossroads, Calhoun County, Alabama, created by mulder, maintained by JC Hartley, with photos of both tombstones by Glenda H. Kilby.

4. Henry Hollingsworth was born 4 October 1795 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 18 April 1845 in Calhoun County, Alabama.[22] In 1822 in Tennessee, he married Rachel Jones. Henry and Rachel are buried in the Henry Hollingsworth family burying ground at Holley Crossroads in Calhoun County.[23]

5. Hannah Hollingsworth was born about 1796 in Franklin County, Georgia. On 29 January 1817 in Franklin County, she married William Brock. I have not been able to find more information about Hannah.

6. Jacob James Hollingsworth was born about 1798 in Franklin County, and married Diana Jones. In many family histories, he has been confused with a man of the same name and same generation who lived in Pickens County, South Carolina, and Etowah County, Alabama. I have not found information about Jacob James after 1816, and am not sure if he remained in Franklin County, Georgia, and died there or moved elsewhere. He is a mystery to me.


[1] Sadie Greening Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia,” online at Loy Sparks’s website dedicated to the memory of Sadie Greening Sparks. See also Sparks, “Samuel Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Garner,” online at the same website.

[2] Sparks, ibid., thinks Samuel was born about 1767. J. Adger Stewart, Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr. (Louisville: Morton, 1925), gives 1770 as his date of birth (p. 143). Alpheus H. Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family, and Particularly of the Descendants of George and Michael Harlan, Who Settled in Chester County, Pa., 1687 (Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press, 1914) also gives 1770 as Samuel’s date of birth (p. 83).

[3] 1790 federal census, Randolph County, North Carolina, p. 289.

[4] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.” See Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2), compiling tax records from Georgia counties, 1793-1892 in 140 volumes held by the Archives. Ancestry provides a search engine and digital copies of these tax records in the collection Georgia Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892.

[5] Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2).

[6] The original will is in the loose-papers estate file of Jacob Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website. The will is also recorded in Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes, Bk. 1814-1823, p. 127.

[7] Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes Bk. 1801-1804, p. 24.

[8] Ibid., pp. 35-7.

[9] On the 1798 tax listing, see Franklin County Historical Society, History of Franklin County, Georgia (Roswell, Georgia: W.H. Wolfe, 1986), p. 247. Note that because Samuel’s household had three polls on this 1798 tax list, Sadie Greening Sparks thinks that this is Samuel, brother of Jacob, and not Jacob’s son Samuel: see “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.” I do think this tax listing is likely for Jacob’s son Samuel, since the number of enslaved people in his estate inventory in 1802 almost matches the number for which Samuel Hollingsworth was taxed in 1798. Samuel had four younger brothers all of age to be polls in 1798, and his father is taxed for only two polls, one of whom is Jacob himself. I think it’s likely some of Samuel’s brothers were living and farming with their brother Samuel in 1798; all four of his younger brothers were married in 1798.

[10] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. T, pp. 81-2.

[11] Ibid., Deed Bk. RRR, p. 136.

[12] See Sparks, “Samuel Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Garner,” citing Franklin County, Georgia, Superior Court loose papers, drawer 199, box 62, FSC #14. I have not seen this document. According to Martha Walters Acker, Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Records 1787-1849(Birmingham, Alabama, 1989), p. 16, Franklin County court of ordinary minutes also note Mary’s 1805 petition of dower. I have searched the 1804-1807 book of court of ordinary minutes without finding this record.

[13] See Sparks, “Samuel Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Garner,” who cites a source in Franklin County records, using a key I do not understand, so that I cannot identify this source.

[14] Loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia.

[15] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. HH, p. 139.

[16] Ibid., Deed Bk. HHH, pp. 9-10.

[17] Ibid., pp. 35-6.

[18] Sparks, “Samuel Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Garner.”

[19] 1850 federal census, Murray County, Georgia, p. 272a (dwelling and family 1271, 19 November).

[20] See Find a Grave memorial page for Hon. John Bush Robins, Zion cemetery, Hempstead County, Arkansas, created by Bobbie Christian and maintained by Nancy.

[21] See Find a Grave memorial page for John Hollingsworth, Hollingsworth cemetery, Fayette County, Alabama, created by Vickie Haley. John’s tombstone gives his dates of birth and death. More information about this branch of the Hollingsworth family is in Fred McCaleb, Family History (priv. publ., 1986), available in digital form at Family search website. See also the Hollingsworth-McCaleb Journalissues of which can be accessedat the Larry E. Whitehead’s My Family History website (and here).

[22] See loose-papers estate file of Henry Hollingsworth, Calhoun County, Alabama, box 5, folder 18

[23] See Find a Grave memorial page of Henry Hollingsworth, Henry Hollingsworth burying ground, Holley Crossroads, Calhoun County, Alabama, created by mulder, maintained by JC Hartley, with photos of both tombstones by Glenda H. Kilby.

One thought on “Children of Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822) — Samuel Hollingsworth (1768/1770 – 1802) and Wife Mary Garner

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