Children of Mary Brooks (d. 1787, Frederick County, Virginia) — Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Husband Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822)

Kennett Monthly Friends Meeting, Chester County, Pennsylvania: Births and Deaths, 1686-1739; original at Swarthmore College in its Philadelphia Yearly Minutes archives; digitized at Ancestry in the collection U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935
Kennett Monthly Friends Meeting, Chester County, Pennsylvania: Women´s Minutes, 1690-1789digitized at Ancestry in the collection U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935

Minutes of Kennett Friends Monthly Meeting in Chester County show Samuel Hollingsworth and Barbara Shewin receiving the meeting’s approval to marry on 4 November 1738.[4] The couple then married at the Centre meeting in New Castle County, Delaware, which was under the aegis of Kennett Monthly Meeting, on 2 December 1738.[5]

Old Kennett Quaker meeting house, Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, photo by Jack E. Boucher for Historic American Buildings Survey, from Library of Congress website

Birmingham township, where this Hollingsworth family lived, is Chester County’s oldest township, dating from 1684. It’s today part of suburban Philadelphia, and is some 30 miles west of that city’s center.[6] Birmingham is about 14 miles north of Wilmington, Delaware. Centre Friends Meeting is, as I’ve just noted, in New Castle County, Delaware, near the present-day community of Centerville about 12 miles south of Birmingham township. Old Kennett Friends Meeting is just across the Delaware-Pennsylvania line at Kennett Square near Chadds Ford in Chester County. Its meetinghouse, first constructed in 1710 by Ezekiel Harlan on land donated by William Penn, dates in its current form from 1718-1731 and is one of the oldest extant Quaker meeting houses in the Delaware Valley.[7]

Chester County, Pennsylvania, Loose-Papers Estate Files #1405: Estate of Samuel Hollingsworth

As noted in a previous posting, Samuel Hollingsworth was the son of an older Samuel Hollingsworth (1673-1748) and wife Hannah Harlan of Birmingham township. Alpheus Harlan places Samuel’s birthdate around 1706 in Kennett township in Chester County.[8] Samuel died testate in Chester County with a will dated 2 October 1751, which was proved 11 November 1751.[9] Samuel’s loose-papers estate file shows his estate being inventoried on the same day by Robert Chalfont and John Chadds.[10] Samuel’s will states that he had two children, Samuel and Jacob, who were to inherit equal shares of his estate when they came of age. The two sons were to be “put aprentices to” Samuel’s brother-in-law Henry Green until they reached age 21, and Henry was to “Learn them to Read Write & Siphor as far as through the Rule of three.” 

According to Harlan, Samuel Hollingsworth is apparently buried in the Old Kennett Friends burial ground at the Kennett meeting house in Chester County.[11] As has been previously discussed, following Samuel’s death, his widow Barbara remarried to Philip Philips at Old Swedes Church in Wilmington, Delaware, on 9 May 1754, and at his death in Baltimore County, Maryland, in early 1765, Samuel Hollingsworth and Barbara Shewin’s sons Samuel and Jacob are listed as Philip’s kin in the inventory of his estate on 4 March.[12] A number of family historians say that Barbara was disowned by the Quaker community on 5 July 1759 for marrying out of the circle of Friends.[13]

I assume that the listing of brothers Samuel and Jacob Hollingsworth as kindred of Philip Philips in his 4 March 1765 estate inventory in Baltimore County means that the two brothers were living in Baltimore County with their mother at that point. Both had come of age. It’s also possible that they had left Maryland by this point, I suppose, though I do not have clear records of their whereabouts until Jacob bought land in Guilford County, North Carolina, on 9 March 1772, a record I discussed in a previous posting.[14] Hollingsworth researcher Harold Graham[15] says that Samuel and Jacob were apprenticed as carpenters while living in Maryland (he says records exist to show this, but does not cite them). He thinks that Samuel and Jacob left Maryland around 1767 and moved together to Guilford County, which was, as the posting at the link I’ve just pointed to tells us, a Quaker center to which many people with Quaker roots in the middle colonies moved in the latter part of the 1700s, often after having spent time in Frederick County, Virginia. Samuel then moved west to Buncombe County, North Carolina, dying testate in Haywood County, which was formed from Buncombe, in February or March 1810.[16]

In First Families of Chester County, Pennsylvania, John Pitts Launey proposes that Jacob, son of Samuel Hollingsworth, married Susannah Justice in 1767 in New Castle, Delaware, and was reported to Centre Friends Meeting for marrying outside the Quaker community, being disowned on 17th of 12th month 1767.[17] This source shows Jacob and Susannah having sons Samuel, Jacob, Thomas, James, and Benjamin, and it states that Thomas died 2nd of 4th month 1834 at Christianna Hundred, Delaware, aged 82 years, 6 months, 2 days. Note that this would place Thomas’s birth in 1752. As we’ll see in a moment, Jacob Hollingsworth did have sons with these names, but none of them remained in Pennsylvania, Delaware, or Maryland after he and wife Mary Brooks went to North Carolina and then Georgia. 

I suspect that Launey has conflated two different Jacob Hollingsworths. According to Helen Jordan, the account book of Governor James Hamilton shows Jacob Hollingsworth and Susannah Justice marrying in March 1748 in Pennsylvania.[18] Harry Hollingsworth suggests that this Jacob may have been a son of Joseph Hollingsworth (1661-1727), son of Valentine the immigrant.[19]

North Carolina Years, 1772-1790

As I’ve stated previously, it seems to me likely that Jacob Hollingsworth and Mary Brooks married in Frederick County, Virginia, and circumstantial evidence places that marriage around 1767-8, so I’m inclined to think that Jacob and his brother Samuel went initially from Baltimore County, Maryland, to Frederick County, Virginia, where they had many Hollingsworth relatives, including Abraham Hollingsworth, a prominent figure in the county, and Robert Hollingsworth, who married Susanna Rice, a sister of George Rice who married Elizabeth Brooks. The 1772 deed showing Jacob buying land in Guilford County, North Carolina, also suggests to me that Jacob and Mary Brooks Hollingsworth did not remain in Frederick County after they had married, but migrated very soon to North Carolina.

Guilford County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 1, pp. 161-3

The 9 March 1772 deed of John and Catherine Pickrell in Guilford County, North Carolina, to Jacob Hollingsworth shows the Pickrells and Jacob living in Guilford at the time, and shows Jacob buying 100 acres in Guilford County at the mouth of Broad Mouth Creek.[20] The deed was witnessed by Enoch Davis and Samuel Barker; Enoch gave oath and the deed was recorded, with no recording date stated. Jacob also appears in Guilford County records on 20 February 1775, when he witnessed a deed by Thomas and Elizabeth Davis to Levi Branson in Guilford.[21]

Randolph County, North Carolina, Lists of Taxables, 1779; original held by North Carolina State Archives, digitized at Family Search site

When Randolph County — another county with a high proportion of Quakers and people who had Quaker background but had lost Quaker ties — was cut from Guilford in 1779, Jacob’s land fell into Randolph. In 1779, both Jacob and his brother Samuel appear on the tax list in Randolph County, Jacob in Captain John Hinds’s district and Samuel in Captain Joseph Hinds’s district.[22] Jacob is taxed for the 100 acres he had bought from the Pickrells in 1772, 40 of which were improved, and for 16 cattle and 6 horses. He had money or bonds in hand amounting to £ 7 8p 10s. The tax list states that both Jacob and Samuel had not taken the oath of loyalty. It shows that many others in the county had also not done so, perhaps due to their Quaker affiliations or roots.

Randolph County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 5, p. 13

We can know that the man who shows up on the 1779 tax list in Randolph County is the Jacob Hollingsworth who had married Mary Brooks and who bought 100 acres in Guilford County in 1772 from John and Catherine Pickrell because on 9 October 1788, Jacob and wife Mary sold the 100 acres, now in Randolph County, to Robert Hodgin, all of Randolph County.[23] The deed states that Mary was Jacob’s wife, and that they had bought the 100 acres they were selling at the mouth of Broad Mouth Creek on the east side of Deep River from John Pickerell on 9 March 1772. Jacob and Mary both signed the deed, and it was witnessed by Lorance Rains (who bought the land from Hodgin) and Daniel Brown. There is no recording information. It’s worth noting that Mary was literate, or could at least sign her name. This was not the norm for women in the South in the 18th century.

The Daniel Brown witnessing Jacob and Mary’s sale of their Randolph County land is, I’m fairly sure, the man of that name who married their daughter Hannah on 12 August 1788 in Orange County, North Carolina. Some researchers have indicated that it was Hannah’s sister Mary who married Daniel Brown, but Hollingsworth researcher Sadie Greening Sparks indicates that, though a 1788 marriage bond of Daniel Brown and Mary Hollingsworth can be found in Randolph County records, this marriage did not take place, and Mary had only one husband, Benjamin J. Wofford.[24] I don’t find a bond for this marriage in Randolph County marriage bonds, however. As we’ll see in a moment, the 15 May 1815 will of Jacob Hollingsworth in Franklin County, Georgia, names daughters Hannah Brown and Mary Wofford.

Harold Graham thinks that the 1788 Randolph County deed made by Jacob and Mary indicates that were selling their land there to move to Burke County, North Carolina.[25] In his view, Jacob’s brother Samuel moved along with them, and they settled in a part of Burke that became Buncombe in 1791 and Haywood in 1809. The 1790 federal census shows Jacob and Samuel both in the 10th militia company, where they are listed near William and Benjamin Wofford, names closely connected to Jacob after he and his family made their final move to Franklin County, Georgia.[26] According to Carl Flowers Jr., William Wofford and his son Benjamin, who would marry Jacob Hollingsworth’s daughter Mary, had already begun moving to Georgia with other settlers by 1787.[27]

Burke County, North Carolina, Land Entry Book 1778-1795, #98 (1798),  digitized at Family Search site

On 16 February 1790, Jacob acquired 100 acres in Burke County from John Thomas, who had entered the land in the forks of Big Ivy River on 1 September 1789, and then transferred it to Jacob Hollingsworth in February 1790.[28] As we’ll see in a moment, when Jacob sold his 320 acres in what had become Buncombe County on 20 April 1796, these 100 acres were included in the 320 acres Jacob sold in 1796.

Though Jacob Hollingsworth is found on the 1790 census in Burke County, North Carolina, by 1790 he begins appearing in Franklin County, Georgia, records. On 2 December 1790 he shows up as witness to a deed by Joseph Martin Russell to William Wofford in Franklin County.[29] The deed shows Russell, of Elbert County, selling to Wofford of Franklin County the 400 acres on both sides of the middle fork of Broad River in Franklin County that would become the Wofford Settlement, with Jacob Hollingsworth and Nathaniel Wofford witnessing and Jacob proving the deed on 11 December 1792. This deed suggests that by late 1790, Jacob had either already moved his family along with Wofford to Franklin County, or was in the process of making that move. It also shows us that in moving to Georgia, he was closely connected to William Wofford.

According to Harold Graham, by 1791, Jacob and his brother Samuel claimed residences in both Franklin County, Georgia, and Burke County, North Carolina. In saying that Jacob continued to have a residence in Burke County at this point, I think Graham is thinking of a 20 April 1796 deed I’ll discuss in a moment in which Jacob sold his landholdings in North Carolina, which had by then fallen into Buncombe County. That deed states that Jacob lived in Franklin County, Georgia, and in my view, he had already settled there by 1791.

Graham speculates that, due to the training Jacob and Samuel had been given by their uncle Henry Green in the trade of carpentry — with further apprenticeship in this trade after their mother married Philip Philips and they moved to Maryland — the two brothers may have gone to Georgia during the 1790s to construct forts and residences for pioneer settlers of the area, though Samuel did not settle permanently in Georgia, but died in North Carolina — though Franklin County, Georgia, records into the early 1800s suggest that Samuel did, in fact, live at some points in Georgia before returning to North Carolina.[30] Jacob built Fort Hollingsworth in the Wofford Settlement in 1793, a structure now in the National Register of Historic Places.

Settling in Franklin County, Georgia, and Building Fort Hollingsworth, 1790-3

A history of Fort Hollingsworth prepared by the Friends of the Fort group online at the Fort Hollingsworth-White House website states that William Wofford and Jacob Hollingsworth moved to Franklin County, Georgia, in 1792 from North Carolina. The area in which they settled became known as the Wofford Settlement. 

According to Steven H. Moffson, who compiled a history of Fort Hollingsworth for its inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places, soon after their arrival in Georgia, Wofford commissioned Hollingsworth to build the fort as a defensive structure that was “essentially an extra-strong dwelling” on the southern boundary of Cherokee territory in what was then Franklin County but later fell into Banks County.[31] By 1798, sixteen families lived in Wofford’s Settlement.[32] The fort was built to accommodate several families seeking shelter together when they were under attack.

Land had been granted to settlers in this area by the state of Georgia in the belief that it lay south of the boundary line of Cherokee territory, which had been established by the treaty of Hopewell in 1785. The state paid for the construction of forts and private stations comprised of stockades and strong dwellings in north Georgia to protect the settlers. In a letter he sent to Georgia Governor Telfair on 2 February 1793, Georgia Adjutant General Augustus C.G. Elholm enclosed a map drawn in late December 1792 which indicates where Hollingsworth’s Fort was then being built in the middle fork of Broad River. The map is entitled “[A] defencive [sic] plan of the western frontier [of Georgia].”[33]

Map compiled by an unidentified compiler to show location of Wofford Settlement and surrounding areas in 1804, in Family Records section of the North Carolina Digital Collection online

When the settlements along the Cherokee boundary line were surveyed before the end of the 18th century, it was found that Wofford’s Settlement and Fort Hollingsworth were located north of the boundary line and not south of it as had previously been believed. The Cherokees protested the incursion into their territory and the violation of the treaty of Hopewell, and Wofford petitioned the state to have the land ceded to him. This took place with the signing of the Treaty of Tellico on 24 October 1804 and the ceding of the “Four Mile Purchase” to Georgia.[34] The Family Records section of the North Carolina Digital Collection online has a map compiled by an unidentified compiler at an unspecified date to show the location of Wofford Settlement and surrounding areas in 1804. The map shows Buncombe County, North Carolina, which was formed in 1791 out of the area of Burke County in which Jacob Hollingsworth and the Woffords lived in 1790, not far north of Franklin County, Georgia. 

Fort Hollingsworth is said to be the oldest standing structure in north Georgia. As Steven Moffson notes, it was bult as a one-room log dwelling with an enclosed dogleg stair to a half-story above.[35] It’s located today near the present community of Alto in Banks County on a rise above Wynn Lake Road, with Hudson Creek running south of the rise and Mountain Creek and its tributary located north and east of the structure.[36]

In an article I no longer find online that was formerly at the north Georgia website, Bonnie Hollingsworth, whose husband is a nephew of Jacob Hollingsworth several generations down the line, recounts a visit she made to Fort Hollingsworth at an unspecified date. She comments on the structure as follows:

The logs used in the construction of the walls still visibly display the marks of the broad axe and drawing knife. I pause and wonder HOW these massive logs were raised into place. The craftsmanship is truly something to behold. Jacob Hollingsworth was obviously a master mason and carpenter, for this building to still be standing after two hundred years!

I made my way up the narrow steps to the upper room. There, you can see the rocks and white mud ‘chinking’ that was used to fill the cracks between the timbers. I inspected and touched each wall, noting the hand-carved wooden pegs that still held them in place. Each truss overhead also had a wooden peg to hold them together where they met at the peak of the roof.

According to Steven Moffson, Jacob Hollingsworth owned the property until his death, at which point he transferred the land to his children. In 1862, the White family purchased Fort Hollingsworth and lived in it as a dwelling house — hence its current designation as Fort Hollingsworth-White House.[37]

Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records, Bk. XXXX, p. 377, the first of consecutive grants to Jacob Hollingsworth on 30 August 1796 totaling 35,000 acres

Franklin County land records suggest that Jacob Hollingsworth lived along the middle fork of Broad River in what was then Franklin County. In a 1997 email, Dr. Harold Graham told me that he had found Jacob amassing landholdings amounting to 35,000 acres in Franklin County, mostly through headright grants for which the titles were vague, so that he never actually acquired most of this land. Dr. Graham told me he had found Jacob receiving some ten grants, each typically 500 acres, but he never got title to most of these tracts.[38]

[Petition] 1793 Jan. 1, Franklin County, [Georgia to] Edward Telfare [i.e., Telfair], Governor of Georgia, by Citizens of Franklin County, manuscript in the Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia

On 1 January 1793, the citizens of Franklin County petitioned Georgia Governor Telfair for assistance with Cherokee attacks on families on the western frontier of the county. Their petition complained that the state had promised them supplies and assistance, and this assistance had not materialized. Jacob Hollingsworth was a signatory.[39] Also signing were Jacob’s sons Jacob and Thomas, both just coming of age at this point.

[Petition] 1793 Nov. 11, Franklin County, [Ga.] to the Governor of the State of Georgia, manuscript in the Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, also digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia — Jacob’s signature

On 11 November the same year, Jacob signed another petition of citizens of Franklin County to the Georgia governor. This petition asked that the state continue offering the county assistance through a troop of horsemen under Owen Bowen’s command.[40] This petition also has the signature of Moses Terrell, whose niece Amelia would marry Jacob’s son Thomas in 1808.[41]

Jacob Begins Acquiring Land in Franklin County, Georgia, 1795-1800

On 3 October 1795, a deed of Simon and Sarah Terrell to Jacob Pennington, all of Franklin County, for 200 acres in Franklin County states that the land was on both sides of Lewis or Coffey’s Creek, which entered into the middle fork of the Broad in Jacob Hollingsworth’s land, adjoining Widow Bobo, Moses Terrell, and Simon Terrell near Jeptha Rush, whereon Elijah Martin was then living.[42] Amelia Terrell, who would marry Jacob’s son Thomas, was a daughter of Simon and Sarah Terrell. This deed tells us that Jacob either had land or lived next to both Moses and Simon Terrell.

Buncombe County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 3, pp. 65-6

On 30 April 1796, Jacob sold his landholdings in Buncombe County, North Carolina, to John Webb.[43] The deed states that Jacob was “of the county of Frankland and state of Georgia,” and was selling John Webb of Buncombe 320 acres on Ivy Creek above William Whitson’s land. Jacob signed the deed with Joseph Hughey and Stephen Hamsten witnessing, and it was registered 13 July 1796.

NARA, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers Who Served From 1784-1811, RG 94 M905; digitized at the Fold3 site

According to Sadie Greenings Sparks, a source identified as Virgil White’s Index to Volunteer Soldiers of Georgia shows Jacob serving in the Franklin County militia from 1793-6. I have not found that source. But Georgia militia records do show Jacob on the muster roll of a militia unit stationed at Wofford’s Station from 1 January to 27 December 1796, when he was discharged.[44] The unit’s payroll shows him paid $21.75 from 17 April to 25 July.

Petition of the Frontier Inhabitants of Franklin and Jackson Counties, [Georgia], 1797 May 8, [to the] Governor [of Georgia, Jared] Irwin, manuscript in Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia

On 8 May 1797, Jacob signed another petition of citizens of Jackson and Franklin Counties to Georgia Governor Jared Irwin asking for a guard to protect these counties from the Cherokees.[45] Signing along with him were his sons Samuel, Thomas, and Jacob. Jacob and his son Jacob signed as Sr. and Jr. Jacob Jr. was born 11 August 1775 and would marry Sarah Martin about 1801. From around 1775 up to the end of the life of Jacob Sr., it’s challenging to know whether Franklin County records that mention Jacob Hollingsworth refer to the father or the son, after Jacob Jr. came of age around 1795. For instance, according to Sadie Greening Sparks, Jacob Hollingsworth is mentioned in Franklin County court records on 13 and 14 September 1796, appraising the estate of James Hayes (along with Samuel Hollingsworth and Elijah Martin), and then the estate of James Wofford (along with Moses Terrell and George Vaughn).[46] This Jacob could be either Sr. or Jr., but is likelier the older Jacob.

On 17 May 1797, Jacob Hollingsworth Sr. purchased 287½ acres in Franklin County from Thomas and Yanekey Payne.[47] The deed says that the land lay on both sides of the middle fork of Broad River and adjoined Reuben Nail. The land was out of a grant to Robert Graves in September 1784. Moses Payne and Malachi Jones witnessed and the deed was filed for record 30 September 1800. (The deed does not designate Jacob as Sr., but it’s clear this is the older man.)

A 2 August 1797 deed of Jacob Pennington of Jackson County, Georgia, to Isaac Thomas of Franklin County for 150 acres on north branches of the middle fork of the Broad in Franklin County states that the land joined Jacob Hollingsworth, Moses Terrell, and Pennington, and that a schoolhouse and path leading from Thomas’s land towards Colonel Wofford were also markers for this tract.[48] This is the same Moses Terrell mentioned previously. Jacob Pennington had come to the Wofford Settlement along with William Wofford and Jacob Hollingsworth, and was from a Newberry, South Carolina, Pennington family discussed in previous postings, which had connections to the Woffords in Spartanburg and Newberry Counties, South Carolina, and was also, as the posting just linked discussed, connected to the Lindsey family of Newberry County who came to South Carolina from the Long Marsh area of Frederick County, Virginia — where Mary Brooks Hollingsworth’s family lived in the latter part of the 1700s.

Franklin County, Georgia, Tax List, 1798, from Georgia Archives’ collection of county tax lists on microfilm; digital copy online at Georgia Archives website

Jacob is taxed in 1798 in Franklin County for 487½ acres, a house and five outbuildings, and two enslaved persons.[49]Also in 1798, in February a list of settlers of the Wofford Settlement compiled when Nathan Smith made his settlement within the Wofford Settlement includes Jacob Hollingsworth.[50] Jacob continues appearing from 1800 through 1821 on tax lists in Franklin County, dropping from the tax list by 1822, when he died.[51]

On 25 July 1799, Jacob Hollingsworth Sr. witnessed a deed of Isaac Thomas to Jacob Hollingsworth Jr. for 100 acres on the middle fork of Broad River in Franklin County adjoining Jacob Hollingsworth Sr.’s land and the land of James Martin.[52] The land was from a grant to Jacob Pennington. The other witness to this deed was Thomas Hollingsworth, brother of Jacob Jr. The deed was recorded 14 October 1801 after Jacob Sr. proved it on 5 October 1801. I think James Martin was likely related to the Sarah Martin whom Jacob Jr. was soon to marry.

On 19 March 1800, Jacob Hollingsworth (no designation of Sr. or Jr. appears in this document) received a grant from the state of Georgia for 473 acres in Franklin County.[53] The grant states that the land was bordered by Call and Bullock northwest, by Baker northeast, and by land surveyed for Richard Call to the southwest.

The Final Years and Jacob’s Death in 1822, Probably in Franklin County, Georgia

On 14 August 1801, Jacob Hollingsworth bought from Caleb Jones, both of Franklin County, 60 acres in Franklin County on the middle fork of Broad River joining Bryant Ward and James Jones.[54] The land was from a grant to Peter Carnes. Samuel Hollingsworth and Robert Brown witnessed, and Samuel proved the deed 5 October 1801 and it was recorded on the 10th. This deed was made about the time that Jacob Hollingsworth Jr. married Sarah Martin, and since it mentions appurtenances on the property, I suspect this is a deed to Jacob Jr. and not Jacob Sr., and may have been property Jacob Jr. was buying as a homeplace for him and his new bride. 

The same day, Jones sold Hollingsworth another 87½ acres on both sides of the north fork of the Broad.[55] The same witnesses witnessed this deed, with Samuel Hollingsworth proving it 24 January 1802 and its being recorded on 4th March.

On 29 June 1802, a Jacob Hollingsworth signed a petition to Governor Tattnall of Georgia, informing the governor that the petitioners (who are not identified as from any particular county) had petitioned President Thomas Jefferson to appoint Colonels Carnes, Easley, and Harris, and Captain James Blair as commissioners to treat with the Cherokee Indians.[56] The petitioners were seeking to obtain a tract five miles wide between the Tugaloo and Apalachee Rivers. The Jacob signing this petition may well be Jacob, son of Samuel Hollingsworth (abt. 1740-1810), brother of Jacob Hollingsworth (1742-1822). That Samuel also signed the petition, using a mark. The petition has as well the signature of Samuel’s son Isaac.

Loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website

Jacob Hollingsworth’s son Samuel died in Franklin County before 6 August 1802. When his property was sold in Franklin County on 27 December 1803, a Jacob Hollingsworth who might be either Samuel’s father or his brother was a buyer at the estate sale.[57] Samuel’s loose-papers estate file shows Jacob signing a receipt to Thomas Lenoir on 12 April 1816 for Jacob’s guardianship of Samuel’s daughter Hannah, who had come of age and would marry the following year.[58]

On 7 November 1807, David Morgan and James Garner, both of Franklin County, sold to J. and Thomas Hollingsworth of the same county 200 acres on the middle fork of Broad River adjoining land formerly belonging to Thomas Payne, but now to J. Hollingsworth.[59] Morgan and Garner both signed with witnesses William Robins and (V.?) Garner, and the deed was recorded 2 January 1808. Note that the reference to Thomas Payne’s land now owned by J. Hollingsworth tells us this is Jacob Hollingsworth Sr., who had bought 287½ acres from Thomas and Yanekey Payne on 17 May 1797.

A 2 September 1808 deed from Samuel and Elizabeth Boling of Franklin County to Thomas and Jacob Hollingsworth of the same for 250 acres on the south side of Leatherwood Creek in Franklin County is, I suspect, a deed to Jacob Jr. and not Jacob Sr.[60]

On 9 January 1815, Jacob Hollingsworth Sr. along with wife Mary and their youngest sons Benjamin and James sold to James B. Wyly 287½ acres (the land he had bought in 1797 from the Paynes) on the north fork of the Broad.[61] This parcel of land sold for $2,200. Jacob, Mary, Benjamin, and James all signed with witnesses N. Dobson and Hampton Holcombe. Holcombe proved the deed in Habersham County on 14 February 1826, stating that he had seen Neely Dobson sign as witness, and it was recorded in Habersham on 18th February. The deed identifies the Hollingsworths as living in Franklin County when they sold the land, which was also in Franklin. Habersham was created in 1817, and at that point, this land fell into that county, hence its being recorded in Habersham deeds when it was recorded in 1826. It would fall into Banks County at that county’s formation in 1859. 

Though Jacob Hollingsworth’s 15 May 1815 will states that he was of Franklin County, Georgia, when he made the will, and he remains on that county’s tax list up through 1821, Sadie Greening Sparks thinks that Jacob moved to Franklin County, Tennessee, at the end of his life.[62] His youngest sons Benjamin and James had moved to that county by 3 November 1816 when a deed in Franklin County, Tennessee, shows a Jacob Hollingsworth buying 59 acres there from William Armstrong, with James Hollingsworth and Robert Box witnessing. The deed states that Jacob was of Franklin County, Tennessee, when he purchased this land. Both witnesses proved the deed at February court in Franklin County, Tennessee, and it was recorded.

In an 18 September 2019 email to me, Darrell Hunter, a researcher of the Todhunter/Hunter family, explains to me why some families — including members of the Todhunter and Hollingsworth families — were leaving Franklin County, Georgia, for Franklin County, Tennessee, after 1810: he writes, 

I have letters that Benjamin Hollingsworth wrote to the Governor of Georgia, first in 1810 answering why so many officers in the Franklin Georgia militia were resigning. Second was in 1811 when he requested that part of his militia remain in Franklin County, Georgia, to protect the wives and little children from Indian attack. In 1812 we find Evan Todhunter in Franklin County, Tennessee, tax List. He is living next door to Jacob Garner. Another researcher and I both believe that many residents of Franklin County, Georgia, left for Tennessee in 1810, due to the Indian uprising. 

Evan Todhunter was born in 1758 in Chester County, Pennsylvania, and moved as a young man to the Fairfax Quaker community of Prince William County, Virginia, an offshoot of the Hopewell Friends Meeting of Frederick County. In 1786, he was censured by the Fairfax community for an infraction, and he moved to Wythe County, Virginia, where he was an ensign in a local militia in 1790, an indicator that he had left his Quaker roots behind. 

He then moved to Franklin County, Georgia, by 1790, where his oldest daughter Mary Hunter married Jacob Garner, son of Jacob Garner and Sarah Hollingsworth. Sarah was a daughter of Jacob Hollingsworth and Sarah Brooks. Evan’s son John T. Hunter (1805-1868) moved from Franklin County, Georgia, to Lawrence County, Alabama, where his family had multiple ties to the Lindsey and Brooks families of that county in subsequent generations. John’s son William Hunter married Margaret, daughter of Dennis Lindsey and Jane Brooks, and William’s sister Mary Jane married Margaret Lindsey’s brother Samuel Asbury Lindsey. Evan Todhunter’s daughters Cassandra and Elizabeth Hunter married Brooks brothers in Lawrence County — Thomas R. and Johnson H. Brooks, sons of James Brooks and Nancy Isbell.

Even though Jacob Hollingsworth bought land in Franklin County, Tennessee, on 3 November 1816, on 14 October 1817, he shows up in Franklin County, Georgia, records selling Alexander Shaw, both of Franklin County, Georgia, 335 acres on the middle fork of Broad River, along with 60 acres surveyed for Thomas Hollingsworth by John Martin and 10 acres joining both of the preceding tracts that Jacob had bought from James Martin Esq.[63] Jacob signed this deed with Thomas Hollingsworth and N. Dobson witnessing, and it was recorded 31 December.

1819 tax list, Franklin County, Georgia, Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2), compiling tax records from Georgia counties, 1793-1892 in 140 volumes held by the Archives. Ancestry provides a search engine and digital copies of these tax records in the collection Georgia Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892

Jacob’s tax listing in Franklin County, Georgia, in 1819 suggests to me that he had remained in that county and had not moved to Tennessee, and was probably acquiring land in Franklin County, Tennessee, only because two of his sons had moved there. This tax listing near the end of his life indicates that he had acquired and held onto substantial landholdings in Frankin County, Georgia.

1820 tax list, Franklin County, Georgia, Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2), compiling tax records from Georgia counties, 1793-1892 in 140 volumes held by the Archives. Ancestry provides a search engine and digital copies of these tax records in the collection Georgia Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892

The 1820 tax list for Franklin County, Georgia, suggests, however, that Jacob had begun to relinquish his farming operations to his sons as he approached the end of his life — and as his will the following year states, he was advanced in years and weak in body. In fact, he signed the will by mark, whereas he had previously signed documents, an indicator of his feebleness as he made his will. The 1820 tax list shows Jacob taxed only for eight enslaved persons.

Loose-papers estate file of Jacob Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website

Jacob Hollingsworth made his will on 15 May 1815 in Franklin County, Georgia, and it was proven at the county court of ordinary on 4 November 1822.[64] The will states,

I Jacob Hollingsworth Senr. of the county of Franklin and State aforesaid being advanced in years and weak in body tho of Sound mind & disposing memory praised be God for the same and considering the certainty of death, and uncertainty of the time thereof, And to the end that I may be the beter prepared to leave this world whenever it may please God to call me hence — do therefore make and declare this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following (To Wit) First and principally I commend my Soul to God my Creator hoping for a Free pardon for all my Sins and to a joy enjoy everlasting happineſs in his kingdom through Jesus Christ my Saviour; Secondly my body I commit to the earth at the discretion of my Executors hereinafter to be made; thirdly and as to such worldly Estate as it has been please God to interest me with I dispose of in the following manner

1st first that all the just debts and funeral expenses be Spedily paid by my Executors

2nd Secondly I will and bequeath to my beloved wife Mary Hollingsworth one Negroe Woman by the name of Fanny and her child Cesar to be her her [sic] right and property during her natural life as well as my household furniture and all my Stock of every kind for the Support of herself and family during life and at her desease, the aforesaid property to be equally divided between my four Sons Jacob[,] Thomas[,] James[,] and Benjamin Hollingsworth. 

3rd during the lifetime of my beloved son Samuel Hollingsworth I distributed and gave to him as much as intended him to have my worldly goods nevertheleſs in consideration of the great affection that I bear to his memory I will and bequeath to his heirs the following Sum (Viz) To Sally Haynes one dollar, To Mary Robbins one dollar To John Hollingsworth one dollar To Henry Hollingsworth one dollar and to Hannah Hollingsworth one dollar To Jacob James Hollingsworth twenty dollars to be paid to them by my Executors out of my Estate.

4th Having also given to my daughter Sally Garner in her lifetime and to her heir Jacob Garner since, her distributive share of my Estate I do in Remembrance of my beloved departed Daughter Will and bequeath to her son Jacob Garner the Sum of one dollar to be Raised and paid out of my Estate by my Executors

5th also for the love and affection I bear until my beloved Daughter Hannah Brown as she has never received heretofore as much as the above mentioned Son and Daughter I will and bequeath unto her the said Hannah Brown Two hundred to be Raised and paid out of my Estate by my Executors

6th I will and bequeath to my daughter Mary Wofford one Negroe Girl Fanny by name now in her posseſsion and at the death of my beloved Wife Mary Hollingsworth her bed and furniture to the Said Mary Wofford

7th I will and bequeath to my four Sons Jacob[,] Thomas[,] James[,] and Benjamin Hollingsworth the balance of my Estate including the following Negroes by name Jack[,] Harvey[,] Harry[,] Lett[,] and Marien to be Equally divided between my four Sons aforesaid at my desease

8th I will and bequeath unto James and Benjamin Hollingsworth also my set of Smith Tools

9th I do Revoke all other Will or Wills by me heretofore made, Confirmed and Ratifying this as my last Will and Testament

10th I do ordain constitute and appoint Thomas Hollingsworth and Benjamin Hollingsworth Executors of this my last Will and Testament, Signed Sealed and Acknowledged this 15th day of May in the year of our Lord Eight hundred and fifteen

                                                                  Jacob Hollingsworth Senr. (his mark)

In the presence of Us

James R. Wyly J.P.

John Womack J.P.

Henry Holcomb

Clement Walters

James Tony

Court of ordinary November Term 1822

Personally came unto open court John H. Wommack & Clement Walters the Subscribing Witneſses to the Within Will Who being duly sworn [Affirm?] & Sayeth that they were Subscribing Witneſses to the Same & that they Saw the Said Jacob Hollingsworth acknowledge the Same to be his last Will & Testament & the Sd. Clement Walters further Says that He saw the Within named Persons Vz. James B Wyly[,] Henry Holcum & James Toney Aſsign their Names as Witneſses to the Same

Sworn to & Subscribed to this 4th day of November 1822

John Warmack

Clement Walters

The date of Jacob Hollingsworth’s will — 15 May 1815 — and its proving date — 4 November 1822 — let us know that he died between those two dates, probably in Franklin County, Georgia, though Habersham had been formed from Franklin several years earlier and Jacob’s land had fallen into the latter county. The will tells us that Mary Brooks Hollingsworth was still living in May 1815. I have not found any further record of her. In my next posting, I’ll discuss the children of Jacob Hollingsworth and Mary Brooks.


[1] Alpheus H. Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family, and Particularly of the Descendants of George and Michael Harlan, Who Settled in Chester County, Pa., 1687 (Baltimore: Lord Baltimore Press, 1914), pp. 33, 83. Harlan proposes 1742 as the date of Jacob’s birth on p. 33 and 1740 as the date of his birth on p. 83. The posting linked in the sentence attached to n. 1, above, has a snapshot of Harlan’s text, p. 83, discussing Jacob Hollingsworth.

[2] J. Adger Stewart, Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr. (Louisville: Morton, 1925), pp. 137, 140, 143.

[3] Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family, p. 33. Harlan thinks that Barbara Shewin was likely a daughter of William Shewin, who is on a 1715 list of taxables in Kennett township as a farmer.

[4] Kennett Monthly Friends Meeting, Chester County, Pennsylvania: Births and Deaths, 1686-1739. Original at Swarthmore College in its Philadelphia Yearly Minutes archives; digitized at Ancestry in the collection U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935.

[5] Kennett Monthly Friends Meeting, Chester County, Pennsylvania: Women´s Minutes, 1690-1789digitized at Ancestry in the collection U.S., Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935. See John Pitts Launey, First Families of Chester County, Pennsylvania, vol. 2 (Westminster, Maryland: Heritage, 2000), p. 83, noting that the application of the couple for permission of their Friends meeting to marry on 13th of 9th month 1738 shows Samuel Hollingsworth “of Birmingham.”

[6] See Dan Roberts, Nancy Jones, and Marge Kennedy, “A Brief History of Birmingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania,” at the Birmingham township website. 

[7] See J. Smith Futhey and Gilbert Cope  History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, with Genealogical and Biographical Sketches (Philadelphia: Everts, 1881), p. 236; Joseph McElroy, “Construction,” at the Old Kennett Meetinghouse website; “Old Kennett Meeting House, U.S. Route 1, 1 mile North of Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, Chester County, PA,” at Library of Congress’s at the prints and photographs section of the Historic American Buildings collection; Eleanor Winsor, Tri-County Conservancy of the Brandywine, “National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Old Kennett Meetinghouse (July 1972),” at the Pennsylvania state government website; and Gene Pisasale, “The many Quaker Meetinghouses of Chester County,” at the Southern Chester County Weeklies website. 

[8] Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family, p. 33. See also Harry Hollingsworth, “Henry Hollinworth of Ballyvickcrannell and His American Descendants,” Hollingsworth Register 5,3 (September 1969), p. 95, which states that Samuel was born “c. 1707.” 

[9] Chester County, Pennsylvania, Will Bk. C, pp. 321-2. The estate file (see infra, n. 10) has the original will, signed by Samuel.

[10] Chester County, Pennsylvania, Loose-Papers Estate Files #1405: estate of Samuel Hollingsworth.

[11] Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family, p. 33.

[12] See The Records of Holy Trinity (Old Swedes) Church, Wilmington, Del., from 1697 to 1773, trans. Horace Burr (Wilmington: Historical Soc. of Delaware, 1890), p. 696; Launey, First Families of Chester County, vol. 2, p. 83; and Maryland Inventories Bk. 87, pp. 81-3.

[13] See, e.g., Harry Hollingsworth, “Henry Hollinworth of Ballyvickcrannell and His American Descendants,” p. 95. In a 23 July 1997 letter to me, Hollingsworth researcher Dr. Harold Graham of Belle Chasse, Louisiana, tells me that Philip Philips was a Baptist, and who appears Chester County in 1753 as an “inmate,” i.e., someone boarding at a house belonging to another person. Dr. Graham may be citing a tax listing.  

[14] Guilford County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 1, p. 161-3.

[15] On Harold Graham, see supra, n. 13. In Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr. (p. 143), J. Adger Stewart indicates that Jacob Hollingsworth and Mary Brooks married in Pennsylvania, then moved to Rutherford County, North Carolina, and on to Franklin County, Georgia, by 1790.  Harlan, History and Genealogy of the Harlan Family (p. 143), has the same information. This information is repeated in Mary Hollingsworth Jamar, Hollingsworth Family and Collateral Lines (Philadelphia: Hist. Soc., 1944), p. 68.

[16] See Haywood County, North Carolina, Will Bk. A, p. 4; and Samuel’s loose-papers estate file held by North Carolina Archives, which has the original will; a digital copy is available at the Family Search website.

[17] Launey, First Families of Chester County, Pennsylvania, vol. 2, p. 67. This source shows Jacob and Susannah having sons Samuel, Jacob, Thomas, James, and Benjamin, and it states that Thomas died 2nd of 4th month 1834 at Christianna Hundred, Delaware, aged 82 years, 6 months, 2 days. Note that this would place Thomas’s birth in 1752. As we’ll see, Jacob Hollingsworth did have sons with these names, but it’s clear those were born to him by Mary Brooks, and none of them remained in Pennsylvania, Delaware, or Maryland after 

[18] Helen Jordan, Pennsylvania Marriage Licenses Issued by Governor James Hamilton, 1748-1752 (1908), p. 234. Jordan is transcribing entries of Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, which had transcribed Governor Hamilton’s account book, held by the Pennsylvania Historical Society. The Men’s Minutes (1739-1791) of Kennett Monthly Friends Meeting in Chester County do show a Jacob Hollingsworth and wife Susanna being disciplined by the meeting for marrying outside the Quaker community, but the date for this action is 17th day of 3rd month 1768. 

[19] See Harry Hollingsworth, “Who Are Joe’s Kids?” and “The Disunity of Henry Hollingsworth,” Hollingsworth Register 9,3 (September 1973), pp. 73-8.

[20] See supra, n. 14.

[21] Guilford County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 1, p. 311.

[22] Randolph County, North Carolina, Lists of Taxables, 1779; original held by North Carolina State Archives, digitized at Family Search site.

[23] Randolph County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 5, p. 13.

[24] Sadie Greening Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia,” online at Loy Sparks’s website dedicated to the memory of Sadie Greening Sparks.

[25] On Harold Graham, see supra, n. 13.

[26] 1790 federal census, Burke County, North Carolina, p. 101.

[27] Carl Flowers, “The Wofford Settlement on the Georgia Frontier,” Georgia Historical Quarterly 61,3 (1977), p. 258.

[28] Burke County, North Carolina, Land Entry Book 1778-1795, #98. This land entry book actually consists of separate books whose entry numbers begin anew with the start of each year. The John Thomas entry is in the book for 1789. The land entry books are digitized at Family Search site.

[29] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. H, p. 96.

[30] See Harry Hollingsworth, “The Hollingsworths and the Wofford Settlement,” Hollingsworth Register 14,2 (June 1978), pp. 37-8, citing a 14 April 1805 passport to Samuel Hollingsworth and others to pass through the Cherokee Nation and an 1807 Georgia land grant to Samuel Hollingsworth.

[31] Steven H. Moffson, application for Fort Hollingsworth-White House on National Register of Historic Places (1998), online at National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places website. See also Flowers, “The Wofford Settlement on the Georgia Frontier,” pp. 258-267.

[32] Moffson, application for Fort Hollingsworth-White House on National Register of Historic Places.

[33] William Wofford, “Letter with enclosures and map of the defencive [sic] plan of the western frontier [of Georgia], [to] Edw[ar]d Telfair, Governor of Georgia / Adj[utant] Gen[era]l Augustus C.G. Elholm,” in the Southeastern Native American Documents, 1730-1842 collection of the Digital Library of Georgia.  

[34] Moffson, application for Fort Hollingsworth-White House on National Register of Historic Places; and history of Fort Hollingsworth by Friends of the Fort at Fort Hollingsworth-White House website.

[35] Moffson, application for Fort Hollingsworth-White House on National Register of Historic Places.

[36] Ibid.

[37] Ibid. See also Sara Hines Martin, “Revelations of a Fort from Yesteryear,” an article originally published in North Georgia Journal, and now reproduced at Ken Hollingsworth’s Genealogy Site at Rootsweb. The article features the recollections of two members of the White family, Peggy White Goodson and Willette White Mote.

[38] Dr. Graham is evidently citing Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records, Bk. XXXX, pp. 377-401. These show consecutive grants to Jacob Hollingsworth of Franklin County, beginning with a grant of 1,000 acres on 30 August 1796. The book then records further grants on the same day to Jacob on pp. 378-401. See Silas Emmett Lucas, Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants in Georgia: 1756-1909 (Greenville, South Carolina: Southern Historical Press, 1988), p. 298, which says that the parcels granted to Jacob in 1796 and recorded in Bk. XXXX amount to 35,000 acres.

[39] [Petition] 1793 Jan. 1, Franklin County, [Georgia to] Edward Telfare [i.e., Telfair], Governor of Georgia, by Citizens of Franklin County, manuscript in the Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[40] [Petition] 1793 Nov. 11, Franklin County, [Ga.] to the Governor of the State of Georgia, ibid., also digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[41] According to Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia,” a case of Jacob Hollingsworth v. Moses Terrell is found in Franklin County superior court records in 1800.

[42] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. L, pp. 69-70.  

[43] Buncombe County, North Carolina, Deed Bk. 3, pp. 65-6.

[44] NARA, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Soldiers Who Served From 1784-1811, RG 94 M905; digitized at the Fold3 site

[45] Petition of the Frontier Inhabitants of Franklin and Jackson Counties, [Georgia], 1797 May 8, [to the] Governor [of Georgia, Jared] Irwin, manuscript in Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries, digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[46] Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.” Sparks does not identify her source other than to cite Franklin County, Georgia, court records.

[47] Franklin County, Georgia, DB NN, pp. 5-6.

[48] Ibid., Bk. L, pp. 80-81.

[49] Franklin County Tax List, 1798, from Georgia Archives’ collection of county tax lists on microfilm; digital copy online at Georgia Archives website; and Franklin County Historical Society, History of Franklin County, Georgia (Roswell, Georgia: W.H. Wolfe, 1986), p. 247.

[50] Hollingsworth, “The Hollingsworths and the Wofford Settlement,” p. 36. Harry Hollingsworth says that he is summarizing information in an unidentified issue of Georgia Genealogist.

[51] See Georgia Archives, Georgia Tax Digests (1890-2), compiling tax records from Georgia counties, 1793-1892 in 140 volumes held by the Archives. Ancestry provides a search engine and digital copies of these tax records in the collection Georgia Property Tax Digests, 1793-1892

[52] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. NNN, pp. 88-9.

[53] Georgia Headright and Bounty Land Records, Bk. CCCCC, p. 364. 

[54] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. NNN, pp. 100-1.

[55] Ibid., Bk. O, pp. 20-1.

[56] [Petition] 1802 June 29, to Josiah Tattnall, Governor of Georgia, manuscript in Telamon Cuyler collection of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries; digitized and available online at the Digital Library of Georgia.

[57] Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes, 1786-1813, p. 80. Martha Walters Acker, Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Records 1787-1849 (1989), lists the references to Samuel’s estate in Franklin County Ordinary Court minutes (pp. 15-16). Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia,” says that Jacob Hollingsworth, presumably Samuel’s father, made returns of the estate to the court in 1808-1816.

[58] Loose-papers estate file of Samuel Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website.

[59] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. RR, pp. 36-7.

[60] Ibid., Bk. RRR, pp. 31-2. The same deed book contains a deed of Jacob Hollingsworth to Benjamin Echols on p. 1, but though this deed appears in the index to Franklin County deeds, this page is missing from Bk. RRR.

[61] Habersham County, Georgia, Deed Bk. C, pp. 177-8. Silas Emmett Lucas, Some Georgia County Records, vol. 7 (Greenville, SC: Southern Hist. P., 1993), p. 290, says that Jacob Hollingsworth appears on the 1820 federal census in Habersham County, with the surname spelled as Hollingshade. He points to the 1815 deed to suggest that by 1820, this family lived in Habersham County, where the community of Hollingsworth about four miles south of Cornelia was found until it later fell into Banks County. But Lucas also shows an 1822 estate record in Franklin County for Jacob Hollingsworth (p. 144), and when Jacob made his will in 1815, he stated in the will that he was residing in Franklin County. In addition, Lucas’s reconstruction of the lost 1820 census of Franklin County places Jacob Hollingsworth in the Captain Green’s district of Franklin County in 1820 (p. 179).

[62] See Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia.”

[63] Franklin County, Georgia, Deed Bk. HH, pp. 178-9.

[64] The original will is in the loose-papers estate file of Jacob Hollingsworth, Franklin County, Georgia; originals held by Georgia Archives, digital copies at Family Search website. The will is also recorded in Franklin County, Georgia, Court of Ordinary Minutes, Bk. 1814-1823, p. 127. For a discussion of the will, see Sparks, “The Family of Jacob Hollingsworth & Wife Mary Brooks of North Carolina & Georgia; Fred McCaleb, Family History, vol. 1 (priv. publ, Fayette, Alabama, 1982), p. 268; and Historical Collections of the Georgia Chapters of the Daughters of the American Revolution (Atlanta: Chas. P. Byrd, 1926), vol. 1, p. 324.

5 thoughts on “Children of Mary Brooks (d. 1787, Frederick County, Virginia) — Mary Brooks (1745/1750 – aft. 15 May 1815) and Husband Jacob Hollingsworth (1742 – 1822)

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