Additions to Multiple Postings: Jane Brooks Lindsey, Mark Lindsey, Thomas R. Brooks, David Dinsmore Lindsey, Nancy Lindsey Morris

To this previous posting about Jane Brooks Lindsey (1797 – 1852), wife of Dennis Lindsey, I’ve added the following notes:

On 6 June 1843, Jane Lindsey appears in an account of the estate of Robert J. Price filed in Lawrence County on that date by John M. Jackson and Elizabeth D. Price. The account shows that Jane paid the estate $18.00 on 28 Feb 1842 (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. G, p. 429).

Jane Lindsey appears in a settlement account of the estate of Russell Smith filed in Lawrence County on 2 August 1847. The account shows Jane owing the estate @21.00 at an unspecified date (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. I, p. 338).

To this previous posting about Mark Lindsey (1774 – 1848), I added the following note:

On 17 February 1830, Lawrence County Orphans Court minutes state that Bennett Wood had asked to be released from his bond on behalf of Thomas A. Strain as administrator of Robert Price, and Mark Lindsey had given bond instead on behalf of Thomas A. Strain (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. C, p. 489).

I also added a digital photo of the appeal of Mark Lindsey and John Dinsmore to Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court on 23 June 1830 for the court to appoint a guardian for their nephews John and Thomas Woodruff (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minutes Bk. D, p. 14). The posting already had a discussion of this document, but not a digital image of it.

To this previous posting about Mark Lindsey (1774 – 1848), I have added the following notes:

On 10 December 1833, Samuel Irwin, Mark Lindsey, and James Kitchens, commissioners of the 16th section, township 7, range 6 west reported to Lawrence County court that an election was held in Oakville on 19 November 1833 with a majority approving of the sale of this tract of land.[7] The date of the election makes me think it was likely a local confirmation of the decision of the Alabama legislature to declare Oakville an incorporated community. The town is at the coordinates given in this record. The legislature’s declaration of incorporation is dated 9 December 1833. This is a revision of previous notes found in this posting.

On 26 April 1834, Mark Lindsey acted with Samuel Irwin as a commissioner in the sale of lots in section 16, range 6, township 7 in Lawrence County (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. I, p. 143). Lindsey and Irwin reported the results on the land sale to Lawrence county court on the day of the sale, with Mark’s son Dennis Lindsey as j.p.

In June 1835, Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court minutes state that Benjamin Cooper had been appointed administrator of the estate of Henry Hodges, deceased, with John Hodges and Mark Lindsey giving bond for Cooper’s administration of the estate (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. 1834-6, p. 178).

Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minutes for 23 March 1836 also state that Mark Lindsey and his son Dennis reported to the court along with Ezekiel Thomas and N.J. Galloway that they had made a division of the estate of Asa Hodges on 27 December 1835 (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minutes Bk. E, p. 342). 

On 5 February 1838, pursuant to a writ from Lawrence County circuit court dated 19 October 1837, Sheriff Denton H. Valliant sold land of John Lindsey to satisfy debts in the sums of $96.35 and $30.75. The debts were owed to James and Thomas J. McDaniel. Valliant sold the land to Mark Lindsey for the sum of $30. The lands were the northeast 1/4 of the southwest 1/4 of section 9, township 6, range 6 west. Denton Valliant held the sale on 5 February 1838. He signed and affirmed the deed on 16 November 1838, and it was recorded 27 February 1839 (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. H, pp. 325-6). As I’ve noted elsewhere, I think John Lindsey, who was born in 1788 in South Carolina per the 1850 federal census, is likely Mark’s brother. He is probably a John Lindsey who is taxed in Wayne County, Kentucky, in 1814 near Mark Lindsey both in the 53rd Regiment, Capt. Vickery’s district. He is also likely the John Lindsey who was in Capt. George Stockton’s company of the 3rd Kentucky Regiment of Mounted Rifles in the War of 1812 on 12 October 1812 in Wayne County, along with Mark Lindsey’s brother-in-law John Dinsmore. John had a wife Susanna whose surname may have been McBride, and they named a son Mark Jefferson Lindsey.

On 23 February 1839, Henry T. Pendleton made a deed of trust to John Orr, Robert Johnson, Drury Stovall, Jonathan Orr, Edward Wise, Lewis Sandlin, Thomas S. Stovall, William Irvin, and Levi Galloway. The deed of trust states that among the debts Pendleton owed was one to John Orr for a note of $226.67. The note was made 14 April 1838, payable to William Simpson, then endorsed by Simpson to Elijah Stover, by Stover to Mark Lindsey Sr., and by Mark Lindsey to John Orr (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. H, pp. 328-331).

In July 1840, Lawrence County Orphans Court minutes provide an account of disbursals of the estate of David Knott to his heirs. The court minutes note that G.W. Rice, acting administrator of David Knott, had received a note on M.S. Morris and Mark Lindsey for $150.75, due for David A. Knott in the estate division (Lawrence County, Alabama, Orphans Court Minute Bk. F, p. 298). M.S. Morris is Moses Stroude Morris, a Methodist minister who officiated at a number of weddings of Lindsey family members, who is discussed here.

On 26 January 1841, a Lawrence County deed of trust made by James McDaniel to James C. McDaniel with Thomas S. McDaniel as trustee mentions Mark Lindsey, stating that Thomas U. McDaniel was co-security with Mark Lindsey and Elijah McDaniel on a note made by James McDaniel to the Bank of Alabama at Decatur in the amount of $2,228.89, due 22 September 1841 (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. I, pp. 377-380)

On 15 March 1841, Elliott Jones made a deed of trust to Mark Lindsey and Benjamin Cooper in Lawrence County with John M. Jackson as trustee (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. I, pp. 434-6). Lindsey and Cooper had gone security for Jones on a note for $1,100 on the 3 March 1841 with the Bank of Alabama at Decatur. Elliott Jones mortgaged property to secure his bondsmen, and he, Jackson, Lindsey, and Cooper all signed. All affirmed the deed on the day of its signing and it was recorded 2 April 1841.

On 19 July 1841, judgment was delivered in Lawrence County court in a case filed by Robert M. Johnson, Edward Wise, and Drury Stovall as administrators of the estate of Daniel Johnson against Mark Lindsey, William H. Price, and Benjamin Cooper. Lindsey, Price, and Cooper owed Johnson’s estate $2039.73, with $83.27 in damages and $35.90 1/2 for the cost of the  lawsuit. By a writ from the court, Lawrence County sheriff Christopher G. Gewin sold the estate administrators for $350 the north east 1/4 of section 24, township 7, range 6 west, with appurtenances thereon, belonging to Mark Lindsey (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. K, pp. 99-100).

On 15 March 1842, pursuant to a writ from Morgan County circuit court, Christopher C. Gewin, sheriff of Lawrence County sold property to satisfy a debt of John Hodges to the Bank of Alabama at Decatur. If I’m reading the document correctly, it states that Mark Lindsey, Charles W. Price, Richard Puckett, and Darius Lynch were Hodges’s securities. Then it names Thomas A. Strain, William Morris, and D.D. Lindsey, the latter being liable for a forfeited delivery bond. It’s not clear to me whether these additional men were also bondsmen for Hodges, who owed the bank $4,261.72 with $11.81 1/4 for the cost of the suit brought by the Bank of Alabama at Decatur. Gewin sold at public auction lands belonging to Hodges, which the bank bought through its agent Jesse W. Garth for $325. The tracts were the east 1/2 of section 17, township 7, range 6 west, the place on which Samuel Irwin formerly lived near Oakville; the northeast 1/4 of section 20, township 7, range 6 west, except about twenty acres in the southwest corner known as the Joseph McDaniel place; and the northwest 1/4 of section 9, township 7, range 6 wes,t known as the place owned by old man Hunter at the time of his death. Christopher C. Gewin’s deputy Charles Gibson signed and acknowledged the deed on 6 June 1842, when it was recorded (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. K, pp. 169-170).

The same day, to satisfy Hodge’s debt, Sheriff Gewin also sold to the bank for $300 the tract on which the steam mill and distillery built by Wood and Carothers stood on the Flint River on both sides of the township road running from Moulton to Sommerville. The deed gives a detailed description of the land’s coordinates (ibid., pp. 168-171).

Also on the same day, as a result of the same legal action, Sheriff Gewin sold John Moore for $35 the southeast 1/4 of section 8, township 7, range 6 west as the property of John Hodges (ibid., pp. 202-3).

Sales in this case continued. On 5 February 1844, acting as agent for the Bank of Alabama at Decatur in this same case, James C. Watkins reported that he had sold another piece of land in Lawrence County for $15. The bank bought the land, which was the northwest 1/4 and the southwest 1/4 of section 17 an d the northwest 1/4 of section 20, all in township 7, fange 6 west.

To this previous posting about Thomas R. Brooks (1807 – 1880), son of James Brooks and Nancy Isbell, I’ve added the following notes:

On 18 April 1826 in Lawrence County, Alabama, Thomas R. Brooks made a deed of trust to John Gregg (Lawrence County, Alabama, Deed Bk. C, pp. 256-7). Gregg had gone security for Brooks on note of $22 and $24 to James Elliott, and also on a note of Brooks to David M. and Ambrose R. Hunter, and to secure Gregg’s bond, Thomas Brooks mortgaged property with Ellison A. Daniel as trustee. The deed of trust is signed by Thomas Brooks by mark, and by Ellison A. Daniel and John Gregg with Markham McMahon as witness. McMahon proved the deed of trust in court 4th Monday in January 1827 and it was recorded 10 March 1827.

To this previous posting about David Dinsmore Lindsey ( ), son of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore, I’ve added the following notes:

As a previous posting notes, Dinsmore Lindsey also appears along with his father Mark in deeds related to land sales held by Lawrence County sheriff Christopher C. Gewin in March 1842 in a case of debt against John Hodges by the Bank of Alabama at Decatur. If I am reading the deeds about the sheriff’s sale of tracts of land to satisfy Hodges’s debt correctly, Mark Lindsey had (along with other men) given security for the note Hodges could not pay, and was therefore implicated in the case. The deeds recording these land sales also state that D.D. Lindsey was “liable for a forfeit delivery bond.”

To this previous posting about Nancy Lindsey (abt. 1801 – after 1870), daughter of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore, and Nancy’s husband William Morris, I’ve added the following notes:

It’s possible the Morrises were still in Lawrence County in March 1842 when, as a previous posting notes, William Morris is named along with his father-in-law Mark Lindsey as a bondsman for John Hodges when the Bank of Alabama at Decatur filed suit against Hodges for debt, and Lawrence County sheriff Christopher C. Gewin sold various tracts of land to satisfy Hodges’s debt.

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