Children of Thomas Brooks (1775 – 1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock: Hannah Brooks (1811 – 1853) and Husband Wesley Huffaker 

Hannah Brooks Marries Wesley Huffaker, Wayne County, Kentucky, 1828

June Baldwin Bork’s abstracts of Wayne County records indicate that there is a marriage record for Wesley Huffaker and Hannah Brooks in that county showing that the couple married there 9 December 1828.[3] As a previous posting notes, the digitized copies of Wayne County marriage bonds available at the FamilySearch site do not include the years 1814-1833, and the county marriage index skips from 1812 to 1832. It has never been clear to me how Bork accessed and abstracted many marriage records in Wayne County for the period for which those records appear to be missing. The catalogue description at FamilySearch for her abstracts of Wayne marriage records states that she abstracted marriage records “for the period 1801 to 1860, found in the Courthouse basement.” If Wayne County has marriage records for the period 1812-1832 stored in its basement, then it seems these have not been filmed and digitized by the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, and are not indexed among other indexed marriage records of the county.

I think the date given by Bork’s abstract for the marriage of Hannah Brooks to Wesley may be the date on which Wesley Huffaker received license and made bond to marry Hannah, and that the couple may actually have married the following day. My reason for stating this is that Hannah’s obituary in the Louisville and Nashville Christian Advocate on 23 February 1854 states that she and Wesley Huffaker married 10 December 1828.[4] According to Bork’s abstract, the minister marrying the couple was Hannah’s father Rev. Thomas Brooks, who was a Methodist minister in Wayne County. The posting I have just linked has a digital copy of Wayne County’s court order book showing Thomas Brooks filing his credentials as a Methodist minister in Wayne County on 29 March 1826.[5]

Wayne County (and Morgan County, Alabama) Records for Hannah and Wesley Huffaker After Their Marriage

Hannah Brooks’s husband Wesley Huffaker was the son of Isaac Huffaker and Elizabeth Hutchinson of Wayne County. As did the Brooks family, the Huffaker family lived just southwest of Monticello. We’ve met Isaac Huffaker in a previous posting, which notes that on 31 May 1819, Robert Gillespie willed land to the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Wayne County to build a meeting house, naming those trustees, who included Thomas Brooks and Isaac Huffaker.[6] As we’ve also seen, Thomas Brooks’s son Thomas Whitlock Brooks married Robert Gillespie’s daughter Nancy.

The church built on the land given by Robert Gillespie in 1819, Bethesda Methodist church, is the church (now defunct) in whose cemetery Hannah Brooks and her husband Wesley Huffaker are buried. Other families in addition to the Brooks and Huffaker families who lived in its vicinity included the Lindsey and Phillips families. As Augusta Phillips Johnson notes in her A Century of Wayne County, the farm of the pioneer ancestor of the latter family, Micajah Phillips, was just south of Monticello near Beaver Creek.[7]Johnson indicates that the Huffaker family lived close to the Phillips family.[8] In my view, this Phillips family may be related to the family of Hannah Phillips, wife of Thomas Whitlock, the parents of Sarah Whitlock who married Rev. Thomas Brooks.

Also living in this part of the county on Otter Creek up to 1821 was the Dinsmore family, which was connected to the Lindsey family through the marriage of Mark Lindsey to Mary Jane Dinsmore. When Mary Jane’s brother John and wife Phebe sold their 200 acres on Otter Creek in Wayne County on 16 February 1821 as they moved to Lawrence County, Alabama, they sold it to Wesley Huffaker’s father Isaac Huffaker.[9] As numerous previous postings have stated, two of Mark and Mary Jane Dinsmore’s sons, Dennis and David Dinsmore Lindsey, married daughters of Thomas Brooks and Sarah Whitlock, Jane and Sarah, sisters of Hannah Brooks Huffaker. And has also been noted, Thomas Brooks had land in Wayne County on both Otter and Beaver Creek. As the posting I’ve just linked states, I think that Bethesda church stood near Beaver Creek, and that Otter Creek ran somewhat west of the church.

Quite a bit of evidence suggests to me that Wesley Huffaker and wife Hannah Brooks lived on his father Isaac’s land after their marriage in 1828. However, on 3 September 1830, Wesley bought from Felix Houck, both men living in Wayne County, two tracts of land in Wayne County, a tract of 200 acres about 1½ miles south of the Cumberland River in the Barrens, and another tract of 98 acres south side of the Cumberland.[10] Wesley Huffaker paid $400 for the land. Felix signed the deed with no witnesses, and it was acknowledged on 3 September and recorded on 20 October. As we’ll see in a moment, Wesley and Hannah sold the bulk of this land in 1836; I find no indicators that they ever lived on it.

As a previous posting has noted, on 28 December 1830 Wesley Huffaker and his brother-in-law Charles Brooks signed for receipt of $100 in legacy money that had been given to them by Thomas Brooks, Charles’s father and father of Wesley’s wife Hannah.[11] As the posting I’ve just linked states, the 8 October 1838 will of Thomas Brooks in Morgan County, Alabama, says that he had given his children Charles Brooks, Jane Lindsey, Alexander Brooks, Hannah Huffaker, and Samuel Brooks $100 legacy money each, and his other children were to be paid $100 legacy money each out of his estate. As the posting I’ve just linked also states, this legacy money apparently came to Thomas’s children from the estate of their grandfather Thomas Whitlock, who died around May 1830 in Cumberland County, Kentucky. A digital copy of Charles Brooks’s and Wesley Huffaker’s 28 December 1830 receipt is at the posting linked above.

On 27 October 1836, Wesley Huffaker and wife Hannah sold to Joseph Roberts and J.B. Cox, all of Wayne County, the 200-acre tract they had bought from Felix Houck on 3 September 1830, along with 80 acres of the other tract of 98 acres they had also bought from Houck at the same time.[12] Wesley and Hannah sold the land for $500, both signing the deed, with both acknowledging it on 27 October and Hannah relinquishing her dower rights.

As a previous posting has noted, the estate file of Thomas Brooks contains a 9 April 1840 note from Charles Brooks, Thomas’s executor, asking Wesley Huffaker to pay Milton McClanahan, who was succeeding Charles as administrator, a debt of some $250 that he owed to the estate (a digital copy of the note is at the linked posting).[13] The $250 Wesley Huffaker owed was apparently a portion of a larger debt Daniel Shearer owed to the estate. It appears that a portion of Shearer’s note had passed into the hands of Wesley Huffaker. As another previous posting notes, when Thomas Brooks and wife Sarah moved from Wayne County, Kentucky, to Morgan County, Alabama, in November 1836, they sold their homeplace in Grassy Valley on Beaver Creek in Wayne County and 300 acres of land to Daniel Shearer.[14] As the linked posting also shows, Thomas Brooks had been selling Shearer, whose land adjoined Thomas’s, pieces of land in Wayne County from 1818 forward.

Another point the linked posting makes: the Shearers and Brooks lived in what is now called Shearer Valley, formerly Grassy Valley, and it’s in that area just south of Monticello that Bethesda Methodist church was located. This posting also points out that the Shearers and Huffakers were linked by marriage: three of Daniel Shearer’s daughters married sons of Wesley Huffaker’s uncle Christopher Huffaker.

Wayne County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. J, pp. 247-9

On 26 September 1842, Wesley Huffaker’s siblings deeded to him for $1,500 their interest in three tracts of land in Wayne County that had belonged to their father Isaac Huffaker.[15] Justus Huffaker and wife Ann, Henry Huffaker and wife Elizabeth Ann, Michael Huffaker and wife Nancy, and Isaac N., George H., and Simon P. Huffaker, heirs and legal representatives of Isaac Huffaker of Wayne County, deceased, signed the deed, selling Wesley Huffaker the following tracts: 50 acres on waters of Beaver Creek bordering Daniel Shearer and patented to Isaac by the Commonwealth of Kentucky on 15 February 1830; 200 acres on waters of the Cumberland River patented to Isaac by the Commonwealth of Kentucky on 24 November 1807; and 96 acres on waters of Beaver Creek, part of a survey of 200 acres patented by the Commonwealth of Kentucky to Robert Green on 20 December 1812 and sold by Green to Isaac Huffaker on 24 May 1813. All parties acknowledged the deed on 26 September with the wives relinquishing their dower interest and it was recorded on 17 October.

As a previous posting notes, June Baldwin Bork transcribes a record from an unrecorded source (apparently Wayne County court minutes) in which Simon Peter Huffaker filed suit against his brother Wesley regarding these tracts of land.[16] Simon’s legal complaint states that his father died 22 May 1835, leaving nine children and a large quantity of valuable lands to his children. Those lands appear to have been in the vicinity of the Bethesda church.  After his father’s death, Wesley bought from his siblings their shares of their father’s land. Simon’s complaint maintained that he had not sold his share of the land to Wesley until he came of age in May 1842, and that when he sold his share to Wesley, his brother refused to pay Simon $20 per year from 1838-1842, plus profits and interest, from his use of Simon’s share of Isaac Huffaker’s land.

The family of Wesley and Hannah Huffaker appears on the 1850 federal census in Wayne County.[17] The census lists Westley (as his name is spelled here) as 44, a farmer born in Kentucky, with $3,000 real worth. Wife Hannah is 38, also born in Kentucky. In the household are children Artema H., 18, Jeptha A., 16, Isaac N., 14, Charles W., 12, Henry A., 10, Juan F., 8, Louisa P., 4, and an unnamed son (George F.), 3 months, all born in Kentucky. Jeptha, Isaac, Charles, Henry, and Juan are in school.

As previous postings note (and see here), the Morgan County, Alabama, estate file of Thomas Brooks has a 2 May 1850 letter of Wesley Huffaker to David Dinsmore Lindsey, who had married Thomas Brooks’s daughter Sarah and was now handling Thomas’s estate.[18] A digital copy is in the first posting linked above, and the second posting explains and transcribes parts of the letter.

As that second posting linked above explains and as I’ve stated previously, when Thomas and Sarah Brooks sold their land in Wayne County, Kentucky, to Daniel Shearer in November 1836 as they moved to Morgan County, Alabama, Shearer had made notes to them and still owed Thomas Brooks $750 when Thomas died. It was about this debt that Charles Brooks wrote his brother-in-law Wesley Huffaker on 9 April 1840 as noted above, asking Huffaker to pay $250 out of Shearer’s note to the estate. As stated above, this suggests that a portion of Shearer’s note of $750 owed to the estate had somehow passed to Wesley Huffaker.

A 27 October 1846 estate account by Milton McClanahan shows Shearer’s debt as insolvent. However, a receipt of Dinsmore Lindsey in the estate file shows that Shearer did pay the estate $665.61 on 12 April 1847. But it appears that the portion of Shearer’s debt owed by Wesley Huffaker had not been paid and it was about this that Dinsmore Lindsey had written Huffaker a reminder, provoking Huffaker’s 2 May 1850 letter to his brother-in-law regarding the debt of $255.50 Huffaker still owed the estate.

Huffaker sent the letter (postmarked from Wayne County, Kentucky) to Dinsmore through the hands of Dinsmore’s brother Wesley: an exterior note on the letter states, “Favoured by the polightness of F.W. Lindsey.” It addresses Dinsmore as “dear brother,” and it states that Huffaker had never received Charles Brooks’s request that he pay his debt to the estate. Huffaker then goes on to tell his brother-in-law that he “cannot conceive that I would doo myself justie to take in the hole order but you seam to grumble about it,” and then asks that Dinsmore either credit him $200 or deduct that amount from his share of the estate (in right of his wife Hannah). Huffaker says that his “presant feelings” would not permit him to pay the balance of $50.

Huffaker’s letter ends with an invitation to Dinsmore to pay a visit to him and wife Hannah, an invitation delivered with a bit of a sting, since Huffaker also states, “I presume that you are well off anuff to lay in the Shade a good deal of your time and come up and pay us a viset[.]  this you ought to doo[.] we would like to see you and come prepared for a final settlement[.]” Wesley Huffaker concludes, “I think you are a reasonable man if this don’t satisfy you let me now [sic] what will[.]  nothing more but remain yours truly.”

As noted previously, the 20 January 1851 list of legatees of Thomas Brooks compiled by Dinsmore Lindsey and filed in Thomas Brooks’s estate file includes Wesley Huffaker and wife Hannah of Kentucky.[19] A digital copy of this document is found in the posting just linked.

Hannah’s Death, Wayne County, 1853

Wayne County, Kentucky, Death Register, 1853, unpaginated; available digitally at FamilySearch

Wayne County’s death register states that Hannah Huffaker died 3 December 1853 in Wayne County, aged 44, born in Wayne County, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Brown [sic].[20] The death register does not list a cause of death, but immediately following the entry for Hannah is one for a daughter of Wesley and Hannah Huffaker, H.E. Huffaker, who died 13 December aged 15 days, so it appears Hannah died as a result of giving birth to this daughter. June Baldwin Bork states that Hannah died of puerperal fever (i.e., infection due to childbirth), but cites no source for this information.[21]

Hannah Brooks Huffaker tombstone, photo by Kevin C. Evans, at Find a Grave memorial page of Hannah Brooks Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown and maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy

As noted previously, Hannah Brooks Huffaker is buried in Bethesda cemetery in Wayne County, Kentucky.[22] According to Bennie and Juanita Coffey, who note that the Bethesda cemetery is about five miles southwest of Monticello, Hannah and her husband Wesley Huffaker have a joint marker.[23] Photos of both Hannah’s and Wesley’s grave markers at their Find a Grave memorial pages suggest that the marker is an obelisk that apparently has the names of both Hannah and Wesley, with dates of birth and death, on separate faces of the obelisk.

Wesley Huffaker tombstone photo by nathandebora at Find a Grave memorial page for Wesley Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy
Wesley Huffaker tombstone photo by Kevin C. Evans at Find a Grave memorial page of Elizabeth Rogers Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy

Wesley Huffaker’s marker states that he was born 28 December 1808 and died 6 June 1877.[24] Ione Adamson Nolan notes that this date of death is given on the tombstone, but she also states that the actual date of death was 3 June 1879, without citing her source for that information.[25] There are actually two different photos of this marker on Find a Grave, one at the memorial page for Wesley, and the other on the memorial page of his second wife Elizabeth Rogers.[26] The second photo shows the date of death clearly as 6 June 1877, but the first shows the final digit obscured by erosion or damage. At first glance, it could be misread as a 9. Bennie and Juanita Coffey transcribe the death date given on the tombstone as 6 June 1877.[27]

Ione Adamson Nolan, The Huffaker Family: A Collection of Genealogical Records on Descendants of Michael and Catherine Huffaker and Allied Families, vol. 2 (Fort Worth: Branch-Smith, 1966), p. 487
See Find a Grave memorial page of Elizabeth Rogers Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by nathandebora

Following Hannah’s death, Wesley Huffaker remarried to Elizabeth Rogers. I have not found a marriage record; there is no bond for this marriage in Wayne County’s book of marriage bonds from 1853-6 and from 1856-9. The 1860 federal census indicates that Wesley and Elizabeth had a son Jeremiah P. Huffaker aged 3 in 1860.[28] Jeremiah is buried in Bethesda cemetery in Wayne County with a tombstone stating that he was born 30 October 1856 and died 30 March 1876.[29] Elizabeth is buried in Bethesda cemetery in Wayne County with a tombstone stating that she was the wife of Wesley Huffaker and giving her dates of birth and death, 11 March 1815 and 10 December 1881.[30]

Notes on the Huffaker Family: Wesley Huffaker’s Ancestry

A number of sources provide information about Wesley Huffaker’s parents Isaac Huffaker and Elizabeth Hutchinson, and about the Huffaker family, a family descending from Johann Michael Hoffaker, a German immigrant who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732. I have not done any kind of careful research of this family line beyond Wesley Huffaker, except to note that the Huffakers were in southwest Virginia, as were the Brooks, before these families moved to Kentucky, and that like the Brooks family, the Huffaker family had strong Methodist ties from fairly early in that movement’s history in the United States. 

I’ll share just a sketch of information I’ve gleaned about this family’s history back in time from Wesley Huffaker from Ione Adamson Nolan’s book on the Huffaker family, as well as from Clarissa Ruth Barnes Smart’s book on the Vickery family, which contains Huffaker material, and from June Baldwin Bork’s volume on Wayne County pioneers.[31] Other researchers than I have no doubt documented this line more carefully than I’m doing as I report information I’ve found in published sources, but have not always verified. If I’m replicating mistakes made in published sources, I’ll appreciate knowing about it.

Isaac Huffaker (1776-1835)

Wesley Huffaker’s father Isaac Huffaker was born 3 September 1776 in Washington County, Virginia,[32] two counties west of Wythe County where the Brooks family lived before it made its move to Wayne County, Kentucky, in 1798. Isaac married Elizabeth Hutchinson in Washington County on 27 January 1803, having already patented 200 acres of land in Pulaski County, Kentucky, on 27 July 1799.[33] Much of this land fell into Wayne County at Wayne’s formation in 1800.

As I noted previously, Isaac lived just southwest of Monticello in the vicinity of Bethesda Methodist church in whose cemetery his son Wesley and daughter-in-law Hannah Brooks Huffaker are buried, and Isaac was, along with Hannah’s father Thomas Brooks, one of the trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church in Wayne County named in Robert Gillespie’s 1819 will in which he donated land for the erection of this church. 

Isaac died in Wayne County on 22 May 1835 after having been kicked by a horse, according to Nolan.[34] He is buried in a marked grave in Bethesda cemetery, a cemetery to which Nolan gives the name Shearer Valley cemetery.[35]

Michael Huffaker (abt. 1730-1732 — 1817) 

Isaac Huffaker’s father Michael Huffaker was born in 1730, prior to his parents’ arrival in Philadelphia in 1732, according to Smart.[36] Nolan, however, thinks that it’s uncertain whether Michael was born prior to his father’s arrival in Philadelphia in 1732 (no wife’s name is mentioned on the passenger list of the ship on which Johann Michael Hoffaker arrived in 1732).[37] In Nolan’s view, it’s possible that Michael Huffaker was born in Pennsylvania, where his father settled after his arrival in America, and in that case, Michael may have been born some years after 1730.

According to Smart, Michael Huffaker married Catherine Kegele in York County, Pennsylvania, about 1757, with the baptismal register of Christ Lutheran church in that county showing their first child George Michael Huffaker baptized there on 4 September 1757.[38] Smart provides detailed information about the family’s migration after this through Fincastle County, Virginia, to Washington County, where Michael settled in Rich Valley on the north fork of the Holston River. 

Marker for Mahanaim Methodist church and cemetery, photo by Timothy, at Find a Grave memorial page for Mahanaim cemetery, Shakesville, Washington County, Virginia

By 1773, when Michael signed a petition to call Reverend Charles Cummings to the Ebbing Spring Presbyterian congregation in Washington County, the family had left Lutheranism behind, Smart thinks.[39]By 1788, it’s clear that Michael and his family had become Methodists, and leading ones in southwest Virginia, since the pioneer Methodist missionary Francis Asbury notes in his journal for 6-15 May 1788 that he had held a Methodist conference at “Half-Acre’s” house in Washington County during that time frame.[40]A note for this passage states that Half-Acre is Michael Huffaker, who is identified as a German immigrant to Virginia, who lived in a large log house about three miles southwest of Saltville, Virginia, a half-mile south of what was to be Mahanaim church erected on a lot sold by Huffaker. The note indicates that the second Holston Methodist conference in 1792 was held at Huffaker’s. An historical marker at the site of Mahanaim church and cemetery notes that Michael Huffaker sold to the church the land on which it was erected, and that Asbury had preached at Huffaker’s house a number of times.[41]

Later, on 25 Oct. 1802 and 5 October 1807, Asbury would write that he was at the homes of Michael’s sons Justus (1802) and Peter (1807).[42] Notes to these journal entries state that Justus Huffaker lived at Rehoboth near the Seven Islands outside Knoxville, Tennessee, and was ordained by Asbury on 31 November 1802, and that Peter Huffaker lived in the Powell Valley of Virginia.    

Smart discusses the house Michael Huffaker built near Saltville in Washington County, Virginia, which was called Greenfield.[43] She states that the house faced a wide and deep creek, the banks of which were lined with many large and beautiful trees. On another nearby stream, Michael erected a gristmill that still stood in 1984. Greenfield has burned, and a frame bungalow was later erected on its site. The basement of this later house contains stones from Greenfield’s chimney. The house’s corn crib, meat house, and hog house still stood in 1984.

According to Steve Cotham, information about Michael’s death appears in Hugh Dayton Huffaker’s History and Genealogy of Michael Huffaker and His Descendants (1927), who states that Michael Huffaker was killed by native Americans in Virginia and buried there.[44] Bork thinks that Michael died about 1 December 1817, leaving a will probated in Washington County, Virginia, on 16 February 1819.[45] She transcribes the will.[46] Bork indicates that Michael is buried in the cemetery of Mahanaim Methodist church in Washington County, for which he sold land as the church was erected.[47]  

Both Bork and Cotham note that a monument to Michael and his wife Catherine is found in Seven Islands cemetery about fifteen miles from Knoxville, Tennessee, where Catherine is buried.[48] It was erected in 1918 by Michael and Catherine’s descendants, who were still continuing their annual meeting at this site on the third Sunday in June in 1985. The monument notes that Michael was killed by native Americans in Virginia and states that Michael was born in Switzerland, though as Smart notes, when the list of passengers aboard the Loyal Judith on which Michael’s assumed father Johann Michael Hoffaker was recorded by the Pennsylvania Provincial Council on 23 June 1732, the council minutes state that the ship’s passengers were from the Palatinate (i.e., Rhineland) region of Germany.[49] This is the region from which the large majority of German immigrants to Pennsylvania came, often sailing, as did the Loyal Judith, out of Rotterdam.

Johann Michael Hoffaker (1700 – after 1750)

Michael Huffaker’s father is presumed to be a John Mickell Houpaker (i.e., Johann Michael Hoffaker), who arrived in Philadelphia in September 1732 aboard the Loyal Judith from Rotterdam.[50] The passenger list of the Loyal Judith gives John Mickell Houpaker’s age when he arrived in Philadelphia as 32. As stated above, this presumed father of Michael Huffaker settled in Pennsylvania, ending up, if I am reading all the previously cited sources correctly, in York County after its formation in 1749.

In my next posting, I’ll provide information about the children of Wesley Huffaker and Hannah Brooks.


[1] See Find a Grave memorial page of Hannah Brooks Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown and maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by Kevin C. Evans; and Louisville and Nashville Christian Advocate (23 February 1854), p. 55, as published by Jonathan Kennon Thompson Smith in “Genealogical Abstracts from Reported Deaths, the Louisville and Nashville Christian Advocate, 1852-1856” at the USGenweb site for Davidson County, Tennessee. Ione Adamson Nolan also states that Hannah’s date of birth was 5 September 1811: see The Huffaker Family: A Collection of Genealogical Records on Descendants of Michael and Catherine Huffaker and Allied Families, vol. 2 (Fort Worth: Branch-Smith, 1966) p. 487. Nolan misidentifies Hannah’s mother Sarah as Sarah Brown and not Sarah Whitlock.

[2] The original handwritten will is in Thomas Brooks’s loose-papers estate file in Morgan County. A transcribed copy is in Morgan County, Alabama, Orphans Court Final Record Bk. 7, pp. 134-5.

[3] June Baldwin Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol 1: Marriages and Vital records, 1801-1860; Marriages, A-J (Huntington Beach, California, 1972). 

[4] See supra, n. 1.

[5] Wayne County, Kentucky, Court Order Bk. B, p. 68.

[6] Wayne County, Kentucky, Will Bk. A, p. 17.

[7] Augusta Phillips Johnson, A Century of Wayne County, Kentucky, 1800-1900 (Louisville: Standard, 1939), p. 172.

[8] Ibid., p. 186.

[9] Wayne County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. C, pp. 228-9.

[10] Ibid., Bk. E, p. 268.

[11] 28 December 1830 receipt of Charles Brooks and Wesley Huffaker to Thomas Brooks for legacy money, in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County, Alabama, Archives.

[12] Wayne County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. G, pp. 135-6.

[13] 9 April 1840 note of Charles Brooks to Wesley Huffaker in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County, Alabama, Archives.

[14] Wayne County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. G, pp. 152-3. See also the digital copy of a deed from an unidentified deed book at the posting linked in this paragraph (supra).

[15] Wayne County, Kentucky, Deed Bk. J, pp. 247-9.

[16] June Baldwin Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records (Huntington Beach, California, 1972), pp. 201-2, 206.

[17] 1850 federal census, Wayne County, Kentucky, division 1, p. 303B (dwelling/family 302; 18 August).

[18] 2 May 1850 letter of Wesley Huffaker to David Dinsmore Lindsey in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County, Alabama, Archives.

[19] 20 January 1851 list of heirs of Thomas Brooks, compiled by David Dinsmore Lindsey, in loose-papers estate file of Thomas Brooks held by Morgan County, Alabama, Archives.

[20] Wayne County, Kentucky, Death Register, 1853, unpaginated; available digitally at FamilySearch.

[21] June Baldwin Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Marriages and Vital Records, 1801-1860; Marriages, K-Z (Huntington Beach, California, 1972), p. 374.

[22] See supra, n. 1.

[23] Bennie Coffey and Juanita Coffey, Cemeteries of Wayne County, Kentucky (priv. publ. 1982), p. 169.

[24] See Find a Grave memorial page for Wesley Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by nathandebora.

[25] Nolan, Huffaker Family, p. 487.

[26] See supra, n. 24, and infra, n. 30.

[27] Bennie Coffey and Juanita Coffey, Cemeteries of Wayne County, Kentucky, p. 169.

[28] 1860 federal census, Wayne County, Kentucky, Monticello post office, p. 374 (dwelling 975/family 959; 28 July).

[29] See Find a Grave memorial page for Jeremiah P. Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by nathandebora. The tombstone is broken.

[30] See Find a Grave memorial page of Elizabeth Rogers Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by nathandebora.

[31] Nolan, Huffaker Family; Clarissa Ruth Barnes Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families (Charlottesville, Virginia: Wayside, 1984), pp. 344-71; and Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records.

[32] Nolan, Huffaker Family, p. 21; Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records, pp. 201-2; Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, p. 31.

[33] Nolan, Huffaker Family, p. 484. According to Willard Rouse Jillson, The Kentucky Land Grants (Louisville: Standard, 1925), the grant is recorded in Kentucky Land Grants Bk. 3, p. 476.

[34] Nolan, Huffaker Family, p. 484. Bork has the same date of death: Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records, pp. 201-2. 

[35] See Find a Grave memorial page of Isaac Huffaker, Bethesda cemetery, Bethesda, Wayne County, Kentucky, created by Sharon Brown, maintained by Elizabeth Kennedy, with a tombstone photo by nathandebora.

[36] Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, p. 364.

[37] Nolan, Huffaker Family, p. 5. Bork also thinks that Michael Huffaker may have been born in either Germany or Pennsylvania: see Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records, pp. 201-2.

[38] Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, p. 364.

[39] Ibid., p. 365.

[40] Francis Asbury, Francis Asbury’s Journal (London: Epworth, 1958), ed. Elmer T. Clark, vol. 1, p. 572.

[41] See Find a Grave memorial page for Mahanaim cemetery, Shakesville, Washington County, Virginia, with a photo of the marker uploaded by Timothy.

[42] Ibid., vol. 2, pp. 366, p. 557.

[43] Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, p. 365.

[44] Steve Cotham, “The Old Seven Islands Cemetery and Church on the French Broad River, Knox County, Tennessee,” Tennessee Ancestors 1,3 (December 1985), p. 151, citing Hugh Dayton Huffaker, History and Genealogy of Michael Huffaker and His Descendants (1927).

[45] Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records, pp. 201-2.

[46] Ibid., pp. 214-5.

[47] Ibid., pp. 201-2. See also Cotham, “The Old Seven Islands Cemetery and Church on the French Broad River, Knox County, Tennessee,” citing a sketch written years ago by Mrs. Walter E. Huffaker of Knoxville, Tennessee, discussing the history of Mahanaim church and Michael’s instrumental role in its development. And see Find a Grave memorial page of Michael Huffaker, Mahanaim cemetery, Shakesville, Washington County, Virginia, created by Gathering Roots, maintained by Mark Huff Dav, with a photo of the monument to Michael and his wife in Seven Islands cemetery near Knoxville, Tennessee, by Mark Huff Dav.

[48] Bork, Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 4: Pioneers, Biographical Sketches and Civil Court Records, pp. 201-2; and Cotham, “The Old Seven Islands Cemetery and Church on the French Broad River, Knox County, Tennessee,” p. 152, citing Hugh Dayton Huffaker, History and Genealogy of Michael Huffaker and His Descendants (1927), p. 5.

[49] Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, p. 347, citing Colonial Records of Pennsylvania, vol. 3, p. 456. 

[50] Smart, The Descendants of Mary Broyles Vickery and Francis Marion Vickery of Wayne County, Kentucky, vol. 2: Wayne County, Kentucky, Related Families, citing Daniel Rupp, “30,000 Names of Immigrants into Pennsylvania,” pp. 79-81; and Straussberger, Pennsylvania German Pioneers, vol. 1, pp. 87-93.  

2 thoughts on “Children of Thomas Brooks (1775 – 1838) and Wife Sarah Whitlock: Hannah Brooks (1811 – 1853) and Husband Wesley Huffaker 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.