Children of Jesse Brooks (1783/1786 – 1860) and Wife Mary: Elizabeth, Thomas, William, and James (1)

This posting and the one following it will represent my best attempt at creating a list of Jesse’s children. As the previous posting, which I’ve just linked, states, Jesse appears to have married about 1804-5, almost certainly in Wythe County, Virginia, where he was living at that time, and from 1826 up to the final decade of his life, his wife’s name appears in documents as Polly. I have not found a marriage record or a record of Mary’s surname, and I do not know with certainty that she is the mother of all of Jesse’s children — but as the posting linked above also indicates, my best guess is that the wife Jesse married in 1804-5 is, indeed, the Mary who was his wife up to the end of their lives together, and that she is the mother of their children. 

Jesse Brooks’s first four children are as follows:

Elizabeth Brooks Lock

a. Elizabeth Brooks was born 1803-7 in Wythe County, Virginia. The 1850 federal census suggests a birth year of 1806 for her; the 1860 federal census has her born in 1805; in 1870, the federal census shows her born in 1807; and in 1880, the birth year suggested by her age is 1803.[1]

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1836, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1836, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage Register Bk. 1, p. 126, available digitally at FamilySearch

On 13 March 1836 in Barren County, Kentucky, Elizabeth married Jacob Lock, son of Richard Lock/Locke and Nancy Dean.[2] Richard’s bond for the marriage, given with Robert Humphrey on 12 March, is on file in Barren County’s marriage files. As the previous posting notes, Robert Humphrey married Elizabeth Brooks’s sister Delphia in Barren County on 30 March 1831,[3] and when Humphrey died between 1839 and 1841, Delphia then married Richard Locke, son of Elder Jacob Locke of Barren County, a pioneer Baptist preacher in the Green River region of Kentucky discussed in the previous posting.[4]

The Jacob Lock whom Elizabeth Brooks married was a son of Richard Locke by his first wife Nancy Dean, whom he married 29 March 1807 in Barren County. Note that while Barren and Edmonson County records use both the Locke and Lock spelling for this family, the Jacob Lock whom Elizabeth Brooks married consistently spelled his surname as Lock.

An 1896-7 Edmonson County, Kentucky, equity court case file documenting a family dispute about the land on which Jacob Lock and Elizabeth Brooks lived provides valuable information about this family, including information about when Elizabeth died. I have not read the original documents in the case file. For my information about this court case, I’m relying on notes sent to me by Brooks researcher Karen Stephenson of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, in July 1999. She had gone through the case file and taken copious notes on it, which include transcripts of the testimony of several witnesses in this case. 

Karen’s notes refer to the case as Locke, Jacob Equity Court Case, Edmonson Co., KY 1896-1897. The notes do not indicate where the case file is located, or how it may be accessed. The holdings of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City do not appear to include scans or photocopies of equity court case files in Edmonson County. In sending me her notes on the case file, Karen told me that she had been in touch with Normal Warnell, author of a book on Mammoth Cave, who had a copy of the documents in the case file. In 1997, Warnell published a book entitled Mammoth Cave: Forgotten Stories of Its People.[5]

Here’s Karen Stephenson’s summary of what this case was about:

In 1896-1897 a court equity case was filed in Edmonson County, KY. The case involved land that Jacob, son of Richard Locke, was living on at the time of his death. Richard did not live on this land. Jacob’s wife, Elizabeth Brooks, died shortly after Jacob did. Billy Adair was the administrator of the estate. There were debts against the estate and Billy Adair sold the farm without contacting all of the heirs. Several years later the Colossal Cavern was discovered beneath the farm. This was reported in the Courier-Journal newspaper. J. J. Hulsey, son of Jacob’s half sister, Margaret, read the article and filed a lawsuit in court over the farm.  George W. Lock sued Lissey Penick for their portion of the estate. The lawsuit was finally dropped because the Eisenbergs who bought the farm had sold it to a lawyer and another man who represented the railroad. The lawyer and the railroad argued over the estate and the Eisenbergs did not get paid for the property. The railroad representative got fired and replaced and the lawyer was finally crowded out and then about that time the U.S. Government took over the land and paid the railroad a condemnation price for it. Eventually the L & N Railroad ended up with the land and the heirs got very little for all of their trouble.

To make sense of this summary of the case, you need to know the following:

  • Richard Locke (1789-1870), son of Elder Jacob Locke and Margaret Jett, married 1) Nancy Dean (29 March 1807, Barren County); 2) Elizabeth Hall (9 April 1815, Barren County); 3) Delphia, daughter of Jesse Brooks (21 October 1841, Barren County).
  • By Nancy Dean, Richard Locke had a son Jacob Lock (abt. 1812-1878) who married Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse Brooks (12 March 1836, Barren County).
  • By Elizabeth Hall, Richard Locke had daughters Milly and Margaret. Milly married Charles Penick, and Margaret married Elijah Hulsey. Lissey Penick was Milly’s daughter. J.J. Hulsey was Margaret’s son.
  • By wife Delphia Brooks, Richard Locke/Lock had children Nancy Jane, Rebecca, Martha Ann, and George Walker Locke/Lock. George Walker is the George W. Lock named in Karen Stephenson’s case summary.
  • The Louisville Courier-Journal article to which Karen Stephenson is referring, which she thinks may have sparked the lawsuit with its report about the 1896 discovery of the Colossal Cavern on the 200-acre farm on which Jacob and Elizabeth Brooks lived, may be an article entitled “Owners of a Cave Entrance” that the Courier-Journal published on 14 March 1896.[6] This article notes the discovery of a cave “said to excel the famous Mammoth Cave for grandeur” on land formerly occupied by Jacob Lock, who died in 1879 [sic], and whose “full and only sister” Mrs. Hulsey left children who were claiming an inheritance in the land — though, as we’ve seen, Margaret Locke Hulsey was Jacob’s half-sister and not his full sister, and the Hulsey children were not direct heirs of Jacob Lock. This article suggests that the Hulseys filed a suit asserting a claim to the land in 1896.
“Owners of a Cave Entrance: Daviess County People Strike a Streak of Unexpected Luck,” Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] (14 March 1896), p. 2, col. 7

Family members who gave depositions in Edmonson County in 1897, and whose depositions Karen Stephenson transcribed, included George W. Lock, his sister Nancy Jane Lock Coats, and Mary Ann Penick Logsdon and Margaret Elizabeth Penick Powell, both daughters of Lissey Penick. Among the valuable pieces of information stated in these depositions was that Elizabeth Brooks Lock died two or three years after her husband Jacob Lock died (Margaret Elizabeth Penick Powell states this) and that Jacob Lock was buried in a grave unmarked in 1897 at the Atwell place a 1½ or 2 miles from Brownsville, Kentucky (George Walker Lock).

Mary Ann Penick Logsdon also stated that Richard Locke’s third wife Delphia Brooks was a daughter of “old man Jesse Brooks,” and her sister Margaret Elizabeth Penick Powell deposed that Jacob Lock’s wife Elizabeth Brooks was Delphia’s sister, and that these sisters had a brother, “the old preacher Jim Brooks,” who was, she thought, still alive in either Barren or Hart County (James Brooks died in 1884, however, and it appears Margaret Elizabeth may have been confusing him with the James Pascal Brooks who was also a Baptist preacher, and who wrote the biography of Elder Jacob Locke mentioned in the previous posting).[7] Margaret Elizabeth also deposed that Elizabeth Brooks’s husband Jacob Lock was “a local Baptist preacher for a good many years.”

Kentucky State Archives, Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records (1852-1910), microfilm #994063, available digitally at Ancestry in the database Kentucky, U.S., Death Records, 1852-1965 (Edmonson County Deaths 1878-1879)

Jacob Lock’s date of death is documented in the Edmonson County register of deaths, which shows him dying on 23 January 1878 in Edmonson County, aged 55.[8] This record states that Jacob was the son of Richard and Nancy Lock, and his occupation is given as “preaching.” 

If Jacob’s wife Elizabeth died two or three years after her husband Jacob did, as Margaret Elizabeth Penick Powell deposed in this case, then it appears she likely died in or about 1880-1, and if in 1880, after her enumeration on the 1880 federal census on 25 June. I think it’s likely that Elizabeth is buried at the same Atwell place at which George W. Lock states that Jacob Lock was buried. I have not found burial information for her.

Please note: numerous online family trees for Jacob Lock and Elizabeth Brooks have erroneously conflated this Elizabeth Brooks with an Elizabeth Richards who married William Lock and died in 1893 in Appanoose County, Iowa. This Elizabeth Lock of Iowa is an entirely different person than Elizabeth Brooks Lock.

As the previous posting states, Elizabeth Brooks’s husband Jacob Lock pastored Little Jordan Baptist church in Edmonson County for a number of years. His wife Elizabeth belonged to this church after the family moved to Edmonson County from Barren County between 1850 and 1860.

Insofar as I’ve discovered, Elizabeth Brooks had no children by her husband Jacob Lock. The testimony of family members in the equity course case discussed above makes no mention of children of Jacob and Elizabeth.

Thomas Brooks

b. Thomas Brooks’s date of birth varies in a number of different records. 19 December 1803 or 19 December 1808 in Wythe County, Virginia. His Find a Grave memorial page reports that his tombstone in Mount Tabor Baptist cemetery in Barren County states that he was born 19 December 1803.[9] However, a number of researchers who have seen the stone and sent me their transcription of it say that the stone states that Thomas was born 19 December 1808. The Find a Grave memorial page does not have a photo of the tombstone.

The 1850 federal census, which shows Thomas and his family living in Hart County, Kentucky, gives his age as 47, which would suggest a birthdate of 1807.[10] The census also has Thomas born in Kentucky, but as we’ve seen, his parents did not move from Virginia to Kentucky until 1810 or 1811. 

Barren County, Kentucky, Death Register 1854, in FamilySearch database “Kentucky Deaths and Burials, 1843-1970

Thomas’s death record in Barren County’s death register states that he died 13 August 1854 in Barren County, aged 44.[11] This would yield a birth year of 1811. The death record states that his father was Jesse Brooks.

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1825, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1825, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage Register Bk. 1, p. 80, available digitally at FamilySearch.

On 22 June 1825, Thomas gave bond with Abraham Lewis in Barren County to marry Susan W. Parrish, with Susan’s father Ephraim Parrish submitting a note of permission for the marriage on the same day.[12] The couple were married on the 23rd by Rev. Jacob Locke, pastor of Mount Tabor Baptist church in Barren County.[13] Minutes of Mount Tabor show Thomas Brooks joining that church in 1835.[14]

Thomas’s death record shows his case of death on 13 August 1854 as flux, that is, dysentery, a common ailment in the southern U.S. in the past, particularly during summer months. Various infectious or parasitic agents could cause it. 

At the time of Thomas’s death, he and wife Susan had a son William T. Brooks living with them, aged 15. The 1830 and 1840 federal censuses indicate that they had older children born prior to 1850, of whom I do not have a record. William Thomas Brooks and wife Katherine Virginia Anderson are buried in Parrish cemetery #1 at Glasgow in Barren County, with tombstones stating their dates of birth and death.[15]

William Brooks

c. William Brooks was born about 1809 in Wythe County, Virginia. His year of birth is indicated by the 1850 federal census, which enumerated William’s family in Barren County, Kentucky.[16] This document gives William’s age as 41 and states that he was born in Virginia. 

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 8, 1841, available digitally at FamilySearch

William Brooks gave bond with Thomas J. Owen on 11 March 1841 in Barren County, Kentucky, to marry Martha Owen, and on the same day, Martha’s father Johnson Owen submitted a note authorizing his daughter’s marriage.[17]

By 1860, the federal census shows William and Martha Owen Brooks’s children Jesse J., James J. and Mary Elizabeth, and Martha J., all found with their parents in Barren County in 1850, in the household of their aunts and uncles in Barren County. Jesse is in the household of his uncle William D. Owen and is listed as Jesse J. Owen.[18] James and Mary Elizabeth are with their uncle Albert G. and Gilly Ann Owen Gillock in Barren County.[19] And Martha J. is with her aunt Susan Parrish Brooks, widow of Thomas Brooks.[20]

These 1860 census listings suggest that both William Brooks and his wife Martha Owen Brooks died between 1850-1860. I have not found death or burial information for them. 

The children of William and Martha, all surname Brooks were Jesse Johnson (1842-1917, married Elizabeth Stinnett); James Jefferson (1844-after 1870, married Mary Melvina Pace, daughter of Barrett Pace and Margaret Walters); John Thomas (1846-1920, married 1] Lucinda P. Hatcher and 2] Lucy C. Spencer); Mary Elizabeth (1848-1923, married Theophilus W. Hatcher); and Martha J. (1850-1918, married James T. Duke).

James Brooks

d. James Brooks was born 4 July 1809 in Wythe County, Virginia. This date and place of birth are stated in a biography of James in J.H. Spencer’s History of Kentucky Baptists.[21] (See the digital images at the head of this posting for Spencer’s biography of James Brooks.) Spencer notes that James was the son of Jesse Brooks, and says that his parents moved in 1809 from Wythe County, Virginia, to Wayne County, Kentucky, where they lived ten years and where James was raised.

The same date of birth for James is reported on his Find a Grave memorial page: James is buried in the Allen-Church-Steffey cemetery, Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky.[22] The memorial page does not have a photograph of James’s tombstone, and it’s not clear to me whether the information provided about his dates of birth and death on the memorial page is a transcript of his tombstone record.

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1827, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1827, available digitally at FamilySearch
Barren County, Virginia, Marriage Register 1, p. 89, available digitally at FamilySearch

Spencer’s biography states that on 27 December 1827, James married Polly W., daughter of Ephraim Parish.[23] The marriage occurred in Barren County, Kentucky, where the original marriage bond shows that James gave bond on the 26th with Polly Parrish’s brother John; the bond spells the surname as Parrish and gives Polly’s name as Mary.[24] The same marriage file in which James’s bond is filed also has the return of Rev. Jacob Locke stating that he married the couple on the 27th.[25] The county’s marriage register book for this time frame also states that the couple were married by Rev. Jacob Locke on 27 December 1827.[26]

Note that James Brooks’s wife Polly/Mary Parrish was a sister of Susan Parrish, who married James’s older brother Thomas Brooks in Barren County on 23 June 1825, as noted above. 

When James’s father Jesse Brooks gave permission on 30 March 1831 for James’s sister Delphia to marry Robert Humphrey in Barren County, James Brooks witnessed his father’s note of permission for the marriage along with Foster Pace, who was Robert Humphrey’s bondsman. The previous posting has a copy of the original note of permission from Jesse Brooks for Delphia’s marriage to Robert Humphrey.

The minutes of Mount Tabor Baptist church in Barren County, which was (as we’ve seen) pastored by the Rev. James Locke who married James Brooks and Polly Parrish, show James and wife Polly joining Mount Tabor in 1835.[27] Spencer’s biography of James Brooks states that James was baptized by Jacob Locke (Spencer uses the Lock spelling for the surname) in November 1837.[28]

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1835, available digitally at FamilySearch

On 16 November 1835 in Barren County, James Brooks gave bond with Robert Parrish, brother of James’s wife Polly, for Robert’s marriage to Agnes Pamilea Wade.[29]

Minutes of Mount Tabor Baptist church show James Brooks given license to preach in November 1844 and being ordained at Mount Tabor in May 1845 about three months after Elder Jacob Locke’s death.[30] Spencer’s biography says that James preached at Little Bethel Baptist church in Barren County for fourteen years after he was ordained, and in April 1846, was made pastor of Mount Bethel, serving that church for thirty-three years.[31] He also did pastoral work at Rock Spring Baptist church in Barren County and New Liberty church in Metcalfe County, according to Spencer.[32]

Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 10, 1847, available digitally at FamilySearch

On 18 December 1847, James Brooks gave bond in Barren County for Thomas Forrester’s marriage the following day to Nancy M. Brooks.[33] The marriage was solemnized by Rev. James Brooks.[34] A number of researchers state that Nancy was a daughter of James Brooks. If so, then the information of J.H. Spencer discussed below, who says that James Brooks and wife Mary Parrish had two daughters, is not correct, since James also had two known daughters Mary and Susan, mentioned below.[35] In addition, the death certificate of Nancy Brooks Forrester gives her father’s name as Sam Bell: Was Nancy a Bell who had married a Brooks prior to marrying Thomas Forrester?

The 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 federal censuses show James and wife Polly/Mary living at Glasgow in Barren County, and confirm James’s birth in 1809 in Virginia. The 1870 census gives him the occupation of minister.[36]

Biographical information about Rev. James Brooks is found in an obituary of Mrs. Dickey Allen published in the newspaper Glasgow [Kentucky] Weekly Times on 27 September 1877.[37] The obituary, entitled “Death of Mrs. Dickey Allen,” says that Mrs. Allen had died the previous Thursday at the residence of her son R.H. Allen in Barren County, and her funeral had been preached the previous day by Elder James Brooks. The obituary states about James Brooks the following: 

Her funeral was preached last Friday evening, at her son’s house to an attentive audience of friends and neighbors, by that old veteran of the cross — and man of God — Elder James Brooks — who has been pastor of the Tabor church for more than a quarter of a century, it was fitting that the funeral of such an one should be preached by such a man. Than Elder Brooks, I presume, no man lives in Kentucky whose unselfish, unswerving, Christian example has done more good upon all with the range of his influence. He has emitted a constant, steady effulgence of Christian example and Christian influence for nearly half a century. Like the great “King of day”, he has given no uncertain, flickering light, but a steadier, stronger light, as he moveth towards the zenith of Christian perfection. He is an animated example of the Divine influence of the principles he advocated. Without money and without price, he has preached the Gospel through a long lifetime; determined to make a landing on the Canaan side of Jordan, with as many rebut the refined theological logic of a Beecher, but no infidel dares to account for the life of a Brooks without admitting the divinity of his religion. He preaches

“That faith that trains upward the penitent soul, / And leads to the Home of the perfectly blessed, / That faith that redeems — and alone can unfold, / That the plans of Jehovah are always best.” 

Mount Tabor, Barren County, 9 Sept 1877.

 Glasgow [Kentucky] Weekly Times (20 August 1884)

James Brooks died in Warren County, Kentucky, on 16 August 1884. An obituary in the Glasgow [Kentucky] Weekly Times on 20 August 1884 states the following:[38]

Elder James Brooks died at his home in Warren county, last Friday, from the effects of a stroke of paralysis. We but echo a universal sentiment when we say a faithful servant of Christ and a beloved and exemplary Christian has been called to his reward. Of such as was Elder James Brooks is the salt of this earth. 

He was buried at the Henry Allen burying-ground, on Beaver Creek, near Mr. William Jackman’s.

James Brooks and wife Mary Parrish Brooks are buried next to her parents Ephraim and Mary Parrish in the Allen-Church-Steffey cemetery at Glasgow. 

According to Spencer, James Brooks and wife Mary Parrish had three sons and two daughters.[39] The children of whom I have a record are Polly W., James W., and Susan E. 

As I note above, James Brooks, son of Jesse and Mary/Polly Brooks, has been confused in various documents and family trees with a James Pascal Brooks (1849-1937) who was also a Baptist preacher in Glasgow, and who wrote the previously cited 1881 biography of Elder Jacob Locke, who was instrumental in the initial organization of Mount Tabor Baptist church.[40] As I’ve indicated, in her 1897 testimony in Edmonson County in the lawsuit about the disposition of land on which Jacob Lock and Elizabeth Brooks lived prior to their deaths, Margaret Elizabeth Penick Powell, daughter of Jacob Lock’s half-sister Milly Locke Penick, identifies the preacher James Brooks living in 1897 in Barren or Hart County, Kentucky, as a brother of Delphia Brooks and Elizabeth Brooks, all children of Jesse Brooks.

But the Rev. James Brooks who was a brother of Delphia and Elizabeth died in 1884, as we’ve seen, and it’s clear that the Rev. James Brooks of whom Margaret Elizabeth is speaking is Rev. James Pascal Brooks, who was living in Hart County in 1884 and actively functioning as a Baptist minister, and who’s buried in the Glasgow city cemetery. According to the Find a Grave memorial page of Rev. James Pascal Brooks, his parents were George William Brooks (1825-1898) and America Ann Harper (1827-1899).[41] America was a daughter of Elder Jacob Locke’s daughter Nancy Ann Locke Harper — a sister to the Richard Locke who married Delphia Brooks, and aunt of the Jacob Lock who married Elizabeth Brooks.[42]

How or whether the Brooks family from which James Pascal Brooks descends is related to the Brooks family of Rev. James Brooks, I have not been able to determine. The multiple connections of two different Brooks families to the same Locke family in Barren County, and the replication of the given name James, not to mention the shared occupations of some of these Brooks men as Baptist preachers, definitely does create confusion.

The next posting will discuss Jesse Brooks’s remaining six children.


[1] 1850 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, division 1, p. 318A (dwelling168/family177; 26 July); 1860 federal census, Edmonson County, Kentucky, Brownsville post office, p. 89 (dwelling 603/family 606; 16 July); 1870 federal census, Edmonson County, Kentucky, precinct 4, Brownsville post office, p. 414A (dwelling 248/family 249; 30 June); 1880 federal census, Edmonson County, Kentucky, 11th district, p. 557B (ED 41; dwelling 202/family 203; 25 June). On this census, Elizabeth is widowed and boarding with the family of Jacob R. Doyle. Note that according to J.H. Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 2 (Cincinnati: J.H. Spencer, 1886), a Richard G. Doyle (1794-1864) joined Mount Tabor church under the ministry of Elder Jacob Locke and later pastored the same Little Jordan church in Edmonson County that Elizabeth Brooks’s husband Jacob Lock also pastored (p. 326).

[2] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1836; and Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage Register Bk. 1, p. 126. The marriage bondoriginal record of the marriage return, and recording of the marriage in the county’s marriage register, are all available digitally at FamilySearch at the links I’ve just provided.

[3] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 5, 1831, available digitally at FamilySearch. See also Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage  Register Bk. 1, p. 105, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[4] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1836, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[5] Norman Warnell, Mammoth Cave: Forgotten Stories of Its People (Brownsville, Kentucky: Norman Warnell, 1997).

[6] “Owners of a Cave Entrance: Daviess County People Strike a Streak of Unexpected Luck,” Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] (14 March 1896), p. 2, col. 7.

[7] James P. Brooks, The Biography of Elder Jacob Locke, Barren County, Kentucky (Glasgow, Kentucky: Times Print, 1881).

[8] Kentucky State Archives, Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records (1852-1910), microfilm #994063, available digitally at Ancestry in the database Kentucky, U.S., Death Records, 1852-1965 (Edmonson County Deaths 1878-1879).

[9] See Find a Grave memorial page for Thomas Brooks, Mount Tabor Church Cemetery, Barren County, Kentucky, created by Richard Parker.

[10] 1850 federal census, Hart County, Kentucky, p. 251B (dwelling 988/family 1016; 27 August).

[11] Barren County, Kentucky, Death Register 1854, in FamilySearch database “Kentucky Deaths and Burials, 1843-1970.”

[12] The original bond and permission note are in Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1825, and are available digitally at FamilySearch.

[13] The original marriage return of Jacob Locke is in ibid., available digitally at FamilySearch. The marriage is also recorded in Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage Register Bk. 1, p. 80, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[14] Sandra K. Gorin, Mt. Tabor Church minutes, Barren County, Kentucky (Glasgow, Kentucky: Gorin Genealogical, 1994), p. 235.

[15] See Find a Grave memorial page of William Thomas Brooks, Parrish cemetery #1, Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, created by Laura J. Stewart, with a tombstone photo by Laura J. Stewart.

[16] 1850 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, on p. 308A (dwelling/family 31; 19 July). 

[17] The original bond and permission note are in Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 8, 1841,, and are available digitally at FamilySearch.

[18] 1860 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, Glasgow, p. 1003.

[19] Ibid., p. 935.

[20] Ibid., p. 915.

[21] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, pp. 388-9.

[22] See Find a Grave memorial page for Rev. James Brooks, Allen-Church-Steffey cemetery, Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, created by Laura J. Stewart. 

[23] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 388.

[24] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 4, 1827, available digitally at FamilySearch

[25] Ibid., available digitally at FamilySearch.

[26] Barren County, Virginia, Marriage Register 1, p. 89, available digitally at FamilySearch

[27] Gorin, Mt. Tabor Church minutes, Barren County, Kentucky, p. 230.

[28] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 388.

[29] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 6, 1835, available digitally at FamilySearch.

[30] Gorin, Mt. Tabor Church minutes, Barren County, Kentucky, p. 313. See also Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 388.

[31] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 389. See also Geraldine Chapman Denison, et al., The History of Mount Tabor Baptist Church: Oldest Church in Barren County (Glasgow: South Central Kentucky Historical and Genealogical Society, 1988), p. 28; and James P. Brooks, The Biography of Elder Jacob Locke, Barren County, Kentucky (Glasgow, Kentucky: Times Print, 1881), pp. 65, 68. 

[32] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 389.

[33] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage File 10, 1847; available digitally at FamilySearch.

[34] Barren County, Kentucky, Marriage Register 2, p. 28; available digitally at FamilySearch.

[35] See infra, n. 38.

[36] 1850 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, 1st division, p. 343A (dwelling 539/family 554; 19 August), showing James as 40, born in Virginia; 1860 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, district 2, Glasgow post office, p. 1053 (dwelling 1111/family 1137; 22 September), showing James as 51, born in Virginia; 1870 federal census, Barren County, Kentucky, Glasgow post office, p. 547B (dwelling 101/family 96; 4 June), showing James as 60, born in Virginia; 1880 census, Barren County, Kentucky, Glasgow Junction, p. 53A (dwelling 155/family 199; 12 June), showing James as 71, born in Virginia. In 1860, James and wife Mary are enumerated on the same page as Henry Eubanks, who was discussed in the previous posting, and who was in the household of Agnes Waters in Glasgow in 1860. 

[37] Sandi Gorin has uploaded a transcription of this obituary to the USGenweb archives for Barren County, Kentucky.

[38] A digital image of this obituary was uploaded by Kenneth Christopher and Michelle H. White to their “White-Forrester-Henderson-Thompson Family Tree” at Ancestry. A transcript of the obituary is on James’s Find a Grave memorial page: see supra, n. 22.

[39] Spencer, A History of Kentucky Baptists, vol. 1, p. 388.

[40] See supra, n. 7. 

[41] See Find a Grave memorial page of Rev. James Pascal Brooks, Glasgow Municipal cemetery, Glasgow, Barren County, Kentucky, created by chcobe, with a tombstone photo by chcobe.

[42] Two articles in the Courier-Journal of Louisville in 1895 and 1920 state that James P. Brooks was a grandson (i.e., great-grandson) of Elder Jacob Locke: untitled article discussing Rev. James P. Brooks’s invention of a rotary printing press, Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] (24 November 1895), p. 13, col. 4; and “Anniversary of Entrance into Ministry and of His Marriage Will Be Celebrated at Horse Cave; Has Record in Organizing Churches,” Courier-Journal [Louisville, Kentucky] (01 August 1920), p. 6, col. 3-4.

One thought on “Children of Jesse Brooks (1783/1786 – 1860) and Wife Mary: Elizabeth, Thomas, William, and James (1)

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