The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)

Nottingham in Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century, p. 71
Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century (Richmond: Bell, Book, and Stationery Co., 1911), p. 71

Or, Subtitled: Silver Clasps, Sidor Presses, and Cows Named Clove

I’ve now posted eleven postings* tracking the ancestry of Strachan/Strahon Monk, who was born about 1787 in Bertie County, North Carolina, and who died between 1850-1858 in Hardin County, Tennessee. About 1805, Strachan Monk married Talitha, daughter of Jesse Cherry (1749-1808) and Elizabeth Gainer (abt. 1761-1836) of Martin County, North Carolina. Between 1810-1820, this couple moved to Tennessee, joining a number of Talitha’s brothers there, who were early land speculators in the daughter state of their native North Carolina.

Two of Talitha’s brothers — Jesse and Isham — settled in Hardin County, as Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk did, while other of her brothers — Lawrence and Darling, who remained in Martin County, and Daniel, who settled in Haywood County, Tennessee — owned land there. As a previous series of postings about Strachan and Talitha Monk’s years in Hardin County demonstrated, they lived there on land on the Tennessee River loaned to them by Talitha’s brother Daniel (see herehere, and here).

Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)

Northampton County, Virginia, Courthouse, 1731
Northampton County, Virginia, courthouse (built in 1731), with yours truly standing beside it, 1991.

Or, Subtitled: A World of Goodwives and “Hay Dogg, Hay Dogg”

In my previous posting, I explained why I’m confident that a William Monk and William Monk Jr. who witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer in Northampton County, Virginia, on 19 February 1708/9[1] are a father and son, and why I’m also confident that William Jr. is the man of that name who died in 1750 in Northampton County with wife Elizabeth, daughter of William and Mary Nottingham. To review my reasons for reaching these conclusions, please click the link I’ve provided and read my previous posting. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)

Monk, William, Northampton Co., Va., Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, 1740-50, p. 531 (1)
Will of William Monk, Northampton County, Virginia, Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, p. 531 (part 1).

Or, Subtitled: Hand Mills, Small Swords, and Beds and Bolsters

In my last posting, I pointed you to the 18 September 1749 will of William Monk in Northampton County, Virginia, to show you that Nottingham Monk, who died before 20 July 1793 in Bertie County, North Carolina, was William’s son: the will names him as such.[1] The first record I find of William Monk in Northampton County is in another will: on 19 February 1708/9 William Munk and William Munk Jr. witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer, along with Robert Howsen and William Dyer.[2] The two Monk men signed by mark. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)”