The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (3)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: Boys and Wenches Running Wild in the Streets of London: Off to Virginia with Them!

In our last posting, we got the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family — Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) — to Northampton County, Virginia. In this posting, I’d like to tell you about his life there insofar as we have documentary evidence of it up to his death between 24 September 1692, when he made his will, and 29 November 1692, when his will was probated. I’ll discuss the will in my final (that is, next) posting about Richard Nottingham. Here are the data I have: Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (3)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: “Wee the Inhabitants of Northampton Countie Doe Complayne”

In my last posting, I introduced you to the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family in Northampton County, Virginia, Richard Nottingham, who was born in England around 1618-1621. I told you that various published accounts of his pre-Virginia life, some of them echoing longstanding tales in the Nottingham family, suggest that he came to Virginia after the defeat of Charles I in 1646, that he arrived with a wife who had the title of Lady and is identified in family stories as Elizabeth Hatton or Hutton, that he came overseas bringing a large sum of money, and that he bought a large tract of land soon after his arrival in Virginia. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)”

An Account of the Life of George Monk (abt. 1707-1744), Northampton County, Virginia

Northampton County Courthouse
The 1899 Northampton County Courthouse (left) and earlier 1732 Courthouse on the historic court green in Eastville, Virginia; by JodyMBrummage, who has kindly uploaded the photo to Wikimedia Commons for online sharing.

We interrupt this regularly scheduled program to….

With my last posting, I told you I had finished sharing what I know of my Northampton County, Virginia, Monk line back to William Monk, who died there before July 1716. I also stated that I was now going to trace the Nottingham line that intersects with my Monk line in Northampton County, and I began that series by telling you what I know of William Nottingham (1669-1719), whose daughter Elizabeth (1700-1749/1750) married William Monk (abt. 1690-1750).

In my series on my Northampton County Monks, I have traced that line back to the father of William Monk who married Elizabeth Nottingham. He, too, was named William, and is the man who died before July 1716 in Northampton County. I have suggested to youthough this is only a guess!— that this William Monk might be the son of either Edward or William Monk, both immigrants to Northampton County by 1640/1. The immigrant William died by 1655 in Northampton County, and he seems to me the likelier candidate to be the father of the William Monk who died in 1716, and who was born in the 1660s, it appears. Continue reading “An Account of the Life of George Monk (abt. 1707-1744), Northampton County, Virginia”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)

Nottingham in Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century, p. 71
Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century (Richmond: Bell, Book, and Stationery Co., 1911), p. 71

Or, Subtitled: Silver Clasps, Sidor Presses, and Cows Named Clove

I’ve now posted eleven postings* tracking the ancestry of Strachan/Strahon Monk, who was born about 1787 in Bertie County, North Carolina, and who died between 1850-1858 in Hardin County, Tennessee. About 1805, Strachan Monk married Talitha, daughter of Jesse Cherry (1749-1808) and Elizabeth Gainer (abt. 1761-1836) of Martin County, North Carolina. Between 1810-1820, this couple moved to Tennessee, joining a number of Talitha’s brothers there, who were early land speculators in the daughter state of their native North Carolina.

Two of Talitha’s brothers — Jesse and Isham — settled in Hardin County, as Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk did, while other of her brothers — Lawrence and Darling, who remained in Martin County, and Daniel, who settled in Haywood County, Tennessee — owned land there. As a previous series of postings about Strachan and Talitha Monk’s years in Hardin County demonstrated, they lived there on land on the Tennessee River loaned to them by Talitha’s brother Daniel (see herehere, and here). Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)

Northampton County, Virginia, Courthouse, 1731
Northampton County, Virginia, courthouse (built in 1731), with yours truly standing beside it, 1991.

Or, Subtitled: A World of Goodwives and “Hay Dogg, Hay Dogg”

In my previous posting, I explained why I’m confident that a William Monk and William Monk Jr. who witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer in Northampton County, Virginia, on 19 February 1708/9[1] are a father and son, and why I’m also confident that William Jr. is the man of that name who died in 1750 in Northampton County with wife Elizabeth, daughter of William and Mary Nottingham. To review my reasons for reaching these conclusions, please click the link I’ve provided and read my previous posting. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)”

Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Using unexpected DNA findings (which show that the group of Lindseys from whom I descend have the Irish Type III genetic signature pointing to southwestern Ireland as the family’s pre-American place of origin) in combination with traditional genealogical research methods, a group of us researching my Lindsey line have determined that it’s almost certain the line descends from a Dennis Linchey/Lynch who came to Richmond County, Virginia, in April 1718 as an Irish indentured servant. It has also come to be obvious to me and others that this Dennis tried to patent land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, after having served his term of indenture, and when he failed at this venture, went to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina, where he acquired land and died in August 1762.  Continue reading “Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)”