The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Nancy Lindsey Morris (abt. 1801 – after 1870)

Lindsey, Mark, Morgan Co. Chancery Bk. 10, p. 530 copy
Suit of William and Nancy Lindsey Morris re: estate of Mark Lindsey, Morgan County, Alabama, Chancery Court Minutes, Bk. 1843-1855, p. 530

Or, Subtitled: Migration of Families from Lawrence County, Alabama, to the Jackson Purchase Area of Tennessee and Kentucky and on to Texas

As I stated at the end of my last posting about Mark Lindsey (1774-1848), I now want to share with you what I know of Mark’s children Dennis, Nancy (Morris), William Burke, Fielding Wesley, and David Dinsmore Lindsey. Dennis (1794-1836) was the oldest son of Mark and his wife Mary Jane Dinsmore, and was given the name Dennis, I have concluded, because Mark’s father was almost certainly an older Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795) of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Nancy Lindsey Morris (abt. 1801 – after 1870)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — Notes on Their (Probable) Sons Ephraim Jr. and John

Clanton, David SC Plats Vol. 14 p 89
1770 plat for David Clanton for 350 acres on Little River in Craven (later Kershaw) County, South Carolina, South Carolina Plat Bk. 14, p. 89

Or, Subtitled: Trying to Make Much Hay from a Few Blades of Grass

As I promised in my penultimate posting, I now want to tell you what little I know (or think I know) about Ephraim and Elizabeth Lindsey’s children — and that’s not much at all, to be candid. As the posting I’ve just linked tells you, I haven’t been able to find an estate document for Ephraim naming his children, though the 1790 and 1800 census (discussed in that linked posting) suggest that he may have had a number of children including both sons and daughters. In the absence of estate records naming his heirs, or land, court, and tax records from which we might deduce the names of children, we have to engage in guesswork based on sparse evidence. The partial list of two (or, for some researchers, three) likely sons we can create on the basis of the limited evidence available to us (there’s simply no documentation, insofar as I’ve been able to determine, on which to base deductions about daughters) is pretty certainly incomplete. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton — Notes on Their (Probable) Sons Ephraim Jr. and John”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)

Nottingham in Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century, p. 71
Jennings Cropper Wise, Ye Kingdome of Accawmacke Or the Eastern Shore of Virginia in the 17th Century (Richmond: Bell, Book, and Stationery Co., 1911), p. 71

Or, Subtitled: Silver Clasps, Sidor Presses, and Cows Named Clove

I’ve now posted eleven postings* tracking the ancestry of Strachan/Strahon Monk, who was born about 1787 in Bertie County, North Carolina, and who died between 1850-1858 in Hardin County, Tennessee. About 1805, Strachan Monk married Talitha, daughter of Jesse Cherry (1749-1808) and Elizabeth Gainer (abt. 1761-1836) of Martin County, North Carolina. Between 1810-1820, this couple moved to Tennessee, joining a number of Talitha’s brothers there, who were early land speculators in the daughter state of their native North Carolina.

Two of Talitha’s brothers — Jesse and Isham — settled in Hardin County, as Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk did, while other of her brothers — Lawrence and Darling, who remained in Martin County, and Daniel, who settled in Haywood County, Tennessee — owned land there. As a previous series of postings about Strachan and Talitha Monk’s years in Hardin County demonstrated, they lived there on land on the Tennessee River loaned to them by Talitha’s brother Daniel (see herehere, and here). Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): William Nottingham (1669-1719)”

Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Life of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan

Screen Shot 2018-05-23 at 3.41.54 PM
William Anderson’s answer, as administrator of Nottingham Monk, to complaint of Amos Raynor,* Bertie County, North Carolina Court of Equity, 23 March 1825, listing heirs of Nottingham Monk; from loose-papers estate file of Nottingham Monk held by North Carolina Archives.

In the three-part series of postings I did recently about Daniel Cherry, his sister Talitha, and Talitha’s husband Strachan/Strahon/Strawhorn Monk of Martin County, North Carolina, and Tennessee, I noted that P.M. Harbert’s “Early History of Hardin County, Tennessee” has the following to say about Strachan (“Strawhorn”) Monk: Continue reading “Will the Real Strawhorn Monk Please Stand Up? Documenting the Life of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860), Son of Nottingham Monk and Rachel Strachan”

“In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191 copy
Hardin County, Tennessee, Entry Bk. 1, Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191-2.

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, p192 copy

In my previous posting with this title, I told you I’d continue the story I began with it, which is about how, when I obtained a copy of the 1837 deed in which Daniel Cherry, a brother of my 3-great-grandmother Talitha Cherry Monk (1790-1860), loaned a piece of land to Talitha and her husband Strachan Monk (1787-abt. 1858), I then did a search of 19th-century land records in Hardin County, Tennessee. As I noted in my last posting, what I found when I did that search has provided me with illuminating information about an eastern North Carolina kinship network that settled on the Tennessee River in southwest Hardin County, Tennessee, soon after 1820. Continue reading ““In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)”

“In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (1)

Cherry, Daniel, 25 Sept 1837, Hardin TN DB H, 13
Hardin County, Tennessee, DB H, pp. 13-14.

Cherry, Daniel, 25 Sept 1837, Hardin TN DB H, 14 (2)

This is a story about a bit of genealogical housekeeping, and how tidying up your notes and filling in gaps as you do that can lead to unexpected genealogical discoveries, as one new piece of information attaches to another new piece of information, providing you a richer snapshot of a family than you had before you did your housekeeping. It’s a story that begins with the simple task of my obtaining a copy of a deed — of the original deed — and reading it, which then led to an investigation of the history of a tract of land, which, in turn, provided illuminating information about an eastern North Carolina kinship network living on the banks of the Tennessee River in Hardin County, Tennessee, from the 1820s forward. Continue reading ““In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (1)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)

Mendelsohn The Lost

This will be my final posting in this series about Patrick Ryan (1846-1893) and his Civil War pension file. If you’re just discovering this blog, you may want to read the whole series of which this is the final piece. What I want to do now is provide some footnotes to  previous postings in the series. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)”