Children of Ruth Brooks (1775/1780 – 1837) and Husband William Greenwood 

Elizabeth Greenwood (Morris, Hilyard)

a. Elizabeth Greenwood was born in 1804 in Botetourt County, Virginia, and died after 1860 in Pike County, Illinois. Elizabeth married 1) Montague A. Morris in 1828 in Sangamon County, Illinois, and 2) George H. Hilyard on 24 May 1860 in Sangamon County, Illinois. Both John Carroll Power’s History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois and Frederick Greenwood’s Greenwood Genealogies state that Elizabeth first married Montague A. Morris and then George H. Hilyard, dying in Pike County, Illinois, at an unspecified date.[1] Power is, I think, citing information provided to him by Greenwood family members, and Frederick Greenwood is, I suspect, citing Power. 

According to Alfred Nelson Morris in his “Genealogy of the Morris Family,” Montague A. Morris (whom he calls Monticue) was the son of John Morris and Jane Jordan of Cabell County, West Virginia, and Sangamon County, Illinois.[2] John Morris was the pastor of the Liberty Baptist church at Laomi in Sangamon County discussed in the previous posting, of which Ruth Brooks Greenwood was a founding member. Alfred Nelson Morris says that Montague A. Morris was born in 1802 and died before 1850. As we’ll see in a moment, Elizabeth Greenwood’s sister Anna married Montague A. Morris’s brother Calvary J. Morris.

Elizabeth Greenwood Morris, 1845 divorce petition, Sangamon County, Illinois, Chancery Court case Morris v. Morris (1845), case file digitized and online at the website, The Papers of Abraham Lincoln maintained by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library
Illinois State Register (Springfield) (16 April 1841), p. 3, col. 7

In 1845, Elizabeth sued Montague A. Morris for divorce, claiming that they had been married about seventeen years prior to 1845, and he had abandoned her. Morris failed to appear in court, and she was granted a divorce.[3] Previously, on 16 April 1841, the Springfield, Illinois, paper Illinois State Register had published dueling notices from Monticue A. Morris and Elizabeth’s brother Thomas, in which Monticue claimed Elizabeth had abandoned him and Thomas stated that M.A. Morris had taken his wife, Thomas’s sister Elizabeth, off to Missouri and no judge should grant him a divorce until Elizabeth had returned to Illinois.

Sangamon County marriage records show George Hilyard marrying Elizabeth Morris on 24 May 1860.[4] Note that Elizabeth Morris (1780-1842), sister of the Elder John Morris whose sons Montague and Calvary married Greenwood sisters, married Joseph Hilyard (1771-1847).[5]

Unfortunately, I have to issue yet another warning now to readers of this blog to ignore misinformation found all over the place in online and published family trees. More than one family tree identifies Elizabeth’s first husband as a Monticue Allen Morris who was born in 1841 and died in 1927, and who married Martha Sample on 8 November 1860. Many of the same trees identify Elizabeth Greenwood with an Elizabeth Ward who married Monticue Morris in Sangamon County on 27 February 1856.[6] Note that this Monticue Allen Morris was 37 years Elizabeth’s junior, and that she married the older Montague A. Morris some years before Monticue Allen Morris was even born. 

I have not found death or burial records for Elizabeth. She and husband George Hilyard appear on the 1860 federal census in Fairmount township, Fish Hook post office, Pike County, Illinois, with only George and Elizabeth in the household, he aged 66 and she aged 55, both born in Virginia.[7] Both Power and Frederick Greenwood state that Elizabeth died without issue. Note that some sources give George Hillyard’s middle initial as W. and not H. Thomas Hilliard was an early settler of Curran township in Sangamon County, where the Greenwood family settled when it moved to that county from West Virginia in October 1824.[8]

Thomas Greenwood

b. Thomas Greenwood was born 5 January 1806 in Kanawha County, Virginia (later West Virginia).[9] On 13 April 1826 in Sangamon County, Illinois, Thomas married Anna Lindley, daughter of Simon Lindley and Anna Standley.[10] Thomas died 7 November 1858 in Sangamon County; he and Anna are buried at Sulphur Springs cemetery at Loami in Sangamon County.[11] Anna was born 2 May 1806 and died 10 October 1848. 

According to Power, the couple had eleven children, two of whom died prior to age 10.[12] Power and Frederick Greenwood list the children as follows (all with surname Greenwood): Eliza (married John Mullen); Simon Lindley (1827-1874, married Elizabeth Meyers); Mary (1830-1848); Ruth Ann (1832-1907, married 1] Hugh M. Forrest, 2] David Ervin McGinnis); William B. (1836-1864, married Anna Young); Sarah Margaret (1837-1902, married Robert James McCartney); Caroline (abt. 1842-1858, married James Madison Coley); Susan (1843-1906, married Matthew Newton Harlan); and Thomas (1845-1863).[13] The two children who did not live past age 10, Anna (1834-1844) and Manda (1840-1840), are buried with their parents in Sulphur Springs cemetery at Laomi. Power and Frederick Greenwood have conflicting information about the death date of Thomas and Anna’s son Thomas as a Union soldier in the Civil War. His service and burial records state that he died in Nashville, Tennessee, on 17 January 1863.

Anna Greenwood (Morris)

c. Anna Greenwood was born in 1808 in Kanawha County, Virginia (now West Virginia) and died after 1850, probably in Jackson County, Missouri. On 17 January 1827 in Sangamon County, Anna married Calvary Jordan Morris, son of John Morris and Jane Jordan.[14] As stated above, the information that Calvary was a son of John Morris and Jane Jordan and a brother of Montague A. Morris who married Anna’s sister Elizabeth is found in Alfred Nelson Morris’s “A Genealogy of the Morris Family,” which notes that the family were living in Jackson County, Missouri, in 1850.[15] Both Power and Frederick Greenwood also state that the family went to Missouri, where both Anna and Calvary (whom Power calls Calvert and Frederick Greenwood calls Culvert) died.[16]

I find this family on the 1850 federal census at Fort Osage in Jackson County, Missouri.[17] The census shows C.J. Morris as 44 and wife Ann as 42, both born in Virginia. In the household are children Ruth J., 22, Mortica (a son), 16, John, 13, William, 12, Sarah, 9, Virginia, 7, and Isaiah, 4. All children prior to Sarah were born in Illinois, and the last three in Missouri. Also in the household are James H. and Eliza Powell, 22 and 19. Elizabeth was a daughter of Calvary and Anna, who married James Henry Powell in Jackson County, Missouri, on 17 February 1850.[18] According to Power, the couple left only three children behind when they died; the 1850 census suggests that Power is not correct on that point.[19] Calvary and Anna’s daughter Ruthy Jane Morris married James A. Beans in Jackson County, Missouri, on 6 April 1851.[20] I cannot find a clear match for either Elizabeth and her husband James H. Powell or Ruth and her husband James A. Beans on the federal census after 1850.

I don’t find Calvary or Anna Greenwood Morris on the federal census after 1850, and assume they died between 1850 and 1860, probably in Jackson County, Missouri. By 1870, their son Mordica is living in the household of Jackson and Mary J. Reynolds at Richmond in Ray County, Missouri, with a set of Morris children who were children of a Joshua Morris (born 1798 in Virginia) and Nancy of Ray County who appear to be relatives of Calvary J. Morris.

The 1860 federal census lists this Nancy Morris heading a household at Crooked River (Richmond post office) in Ray County, Missouri, and shows her as aged 52 and born in Virginia.[21] In her household are children Dickerson, 27, Charles, 23, Leah, 19, and Hiram, 13. Dickerson is born in Virginia and the other children in Missouri. Previously, in 1850, Nancy is found on the federal census in Ray County with husband Joshua Morris and a set of children matching (more or less) those enumerated above. The 1870 federal census shows Dickinson, 37, Mordica, 36, Leah, 30, and Hiram, 24, living once again at Richmond in Ray County in the household of Jackson and Mary J. Reynolds.[22] Note that the Mordica Morris found on this 1870 census seems to match — in age, at least (the census gives Virginia as his birthplace) — the Mortica Morris found in the household of Calvary and Anna in 1850. 

Another warning about family trees found in various places online: one tree after another has Ann/Anna Greenwood, daughter of William Greenwood and Ruth Brooks, married to a Calvary J. Morris (1798-1871) who was the uncle of the Calvary Jordan Morris whom Anna Greenwood married. The elder Calvary J. Morris, who was a U.S. congressman from Ohio in 1837-1843, married Mary Jewett in 1818 in Athens County, Ohio.[23] And I include myself as I issue this warning: My own tree for this family has long stated that the Calvary J. Morris whom Anna Greenwood married was the elder man who was uncle of the Calvary Jordan Morris whom Anna married.

John Greenwood

d. John Greenwood was born 3 January 1810 in Cabell County, Virginia (later West Virginia).[24] Power, Frederick Greenwood, and History of Sangamon County, Illinois all state that John married Eliza Miller in Sangamon County on 20 October 1832.[25] However, Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index (online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office) gives the marriage date as 14 November 1831. Following Eliza’s death in Sangamon County on 10 February 1841, John married her sister Emily Miller. Power, Frederick Greenwood, and History of Sangamon County, Illinois all give the date of this marriage as 10 March 1842, but FamilySearch’s Illinois County Marriages database gives the marriage date as 8 March 1843.[26] Eliza/Elizabeth and Emily were daughters of Jacob Miller and Lucinda Poats.

John died 4 May 1880 near Chatham in Sangamon County and is buried with both wives at Sulphur Springs cemetery at Loami in Sangamon County.[27] John’s three children (all by wife Eliza/Elizabeth and all with surname Greenwood) were James William (1834-1927, married Margaret B. Baker, daughter of Thomas Baker and Nancy Robinson); Leah Margaret (1835-1924, married Fielding M. Neal, son of Stephen B. Neal and Julia Ann Wyckoff); and Ruth Jane (1837-1917, married Joel Latham Franklin, son of Reuben Franklin and Polly Hickman).[28]

David E. Gibson, from Plat Book and Illustrated Atlas of Sangamon County, Illinois (St. Louis: Brink, McCormick & Co., 1874, uploaded by Connie Clark to David E. Gibson’s Find a Grave memorial page, Sulphur Springs, Laomi, Sangamon County, Illinois
David E. Gibson farm, from ibid.

Mary/Polly Greenwood (Gibson)

e. Mary/Polly Greenwood was born 8 January 1812 in Cabell County, Virginia (later West Virginia).[29] On 14 April 1831 in Sangamon County, Mary married David Ervin Gibson.[30] Mary died 24 March 1842. I have not found a burial record for her, but suspect she is buried in the Sulphur Springs cemetery at Laomi in Sangamon County in which several of her siblings are buried, and in which I also think it’s likely her parents are buried. David E. Gibson is himself buried there with his second wife Julia Ann Hall, whom he married after Polly Greenwood Gibson’s early death.[31]

The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library’s Papers of Abraham Lincoln website offers the following brief biography of David E. Gibson:[32]

Born: 1811-04-16 Fayette County, Kentucky

Flourished: Sangamon County, Illinois

Gibson lived in Illinois by 1831, when he married Mary Greenwood, with whom he had five children. Mary died in 1842, and David remarried to Julia A. Hall, with whom he had five children. Gibson was a farmer near Loami. In 1860, he owned $20,000 worth of real estate and $3,000 worth of personal property.

Mary Greenwood and David Ervin Gibson had the following children, all with surname Gibson: Mary Ann (1832-1891, married John Cyrus Creswell); William Montague Wilson (1834-1911, married Elizabeth Fowler); John Thomas (1836-1895, married Millicent Jarrett); America (1838-1925, married James Madison Coley following the death of his first wife Caroline Greenwood, America’s first cousin); and Elizabeth, (1841-1879, married Henry A. Weber).[33]

Tombstone of Edmund and Jennettie Foster Greenwood, from Edmund’s Find a Grave memorial page, Greenwood Farm cemetery, Brashear, Adair County, Missouri, photo by ShopGirl

Edmund Greenwood

f. Edmund Greenwood was born 8 January 1814 in Cabell County, Virginia (now West Virginia).[34] On 11 August 1835 in Sangamon County, he married Jennettie Foster, daughter of Peyton Foster and Mary/Polly Daniels.[35] Edmund died on 30 May 1897 in Adair County, Missouri, where he and Jennettie are buried in the Greenwood Farm cemetery at Brashear.[36] Power notes that the family moved from Sangamon County, Illinois, to Adair County, Missouri, in the fall of 1852. [37] 

Portrait of James Mickleborough Greenwood, from “James M. Greenwood,” in Missouri Valley Historical Society Records, Kansas City, Missouri, Public Library

About Edmund, Frederick Greenwood states, “In his business dealings he never sued now has he ever been sued by another; for 30 years he has not given a note nor has he any evidence of indebtedness. His motto is: ‘If you can’t pay, don’t buy.’”[38] As a previous posting notes, I think much of the information about the Greenwood family in Power’s and Frederick Greenwood’s books came to these authors from Edmund and Jennettie’s son James Mickleborough Greenwood, who was discussed in the posting I’ve just linked.

The children of Edmund Greenwood and Jennettie Foster, all with surname Greenwood, are as follows: James Mickleborough (1836-1914, married 1] Amanda A. McDaniel, daughter of Gabriel McDaniel and Martha Riley Carter, and 2] Josephine Woodbury, daughter of Caleb C. Woodbury and Jane Minier); Ruth Eveline (1838-1933, married James Jackson Hatfield, son of Benjamin Thornberry Hatfield and Mary Ann Rawlings); Peyton Foster (1840-1918), married 1] Frances M. Foster, and 2] Julia Ann Bryan, daughter of Samuel Bryan and Sarah T. Phemister); Sarah Elizabeth (1852-1881, married Thomas Preston Wiseman); and Mary/Polly Ann (1854-1948, married 1] Vincent H. King, and 2] ? Spitler).[39]

Peyton Foster Greenwood, from his Find a Grave memorial page, Forest-Llewellyn cemetery, Kirksville, Adair County, Missouri, created by Brent Shelton, photo uploaded by Brent Shelton

Sarah Greenwood (Gibson)

g. Sarah Greenwood was born 2 November 1816 in Cabell County, Virginia (now West Virginia).[40] On 5 May 1832 in Sangamon County, Sarah married James M. Gibson, son of John Gibson and Nancy Hampton.[41] Sarah died 12 May 1853 in Sangamon County and is buried with James M. Gibson in Gibson cemetery at Curran in Sangamon County.[42]

The children of Sarah Greenwood and James M. Gibson are as follows (all with surname Gibson): Nancy Jane (1833-1911, married James E. Campbell); John William (1834-1893), Samuel P. (1836-1901, married Sarah Van Doren); Thomas Brooks (1838-1923, married Sophia A. McComas); Preston H. (1840-, married Mary E. Sommers); Margaret Ruth (1842-1933, married George Washington Campbell); Mary E. (1844-1844); and Martha A. (1844- 1873, married James Kinter). Mary and Martha were twins.

Margaret Greenwood (Foster)

h. Margaret Greenwood was born about 1820 in Cabell County, Virginia (now West Virginia).[43] On 4 June 1835 in Sangamon County, Margaret married William Henry Harrison Foster, son of Peyton Foster and Mary/Polly Daniels.[44] Note that William H. Foster was a brother of Jennettie Foster, who married Margaret’s brother Edmund. Power states that Margaret died “in Nebraska, on the road to the Pacific.”[45] It appears she died between 1850, when she and husband William are enumerated on the federal census with their children in Sangamon County, and 1860, when William appears with a wife Caroline and his children by Margaret on the federal census at Montezuma in Solano County, California.[46]

The children of Margaret Greenwood and William Henry Harrison Foster, all with surname Foster, are as follows: Mary Jane (1837-1924, married Peyton Foster, son of George Foster and Sarah Miller); George (1839- ?); Elizabeth (1841-1931, married Alexander Ayers); Jennette (1843- ?); Sarah Frances (1848-1922, married Joshua James Priest); and Margaret (1850-?).

See Find a Grave memorial page of William V. Greenwood, Sulphur Springs cemetery, Loami, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by mrbrtsn and maintained by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, with a tombstone photo by mrbrtsn

William V. Greenwood

i. William V. Greenwood was born 18 April 1826 in Sangamon County, Illinois.[47] On 5 December 1845 in Sangamon County, he married Barbara Ann Starr, daughter of Andrew Starr and Mary Neal.[48] William died 6 February 1898 and is buried with wife Barbara at Sulphur Springs cemetery, Loami, Sangamon County.[49]

William V. Greenwood and Barbara Ann Starr had two sons, both with surname Greenwood: Christopher Columbus (1846-1923, married Zula Sirilda Hillerman); and George Washington (1849-1897, married Emma A. Baker).


[1] John Carroll Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois (Springfield, Illinois: Edwin A. Wilson, 1876), p. 335; Frederick Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914: The Ancestry and Descendants of Thomas Greenwood, of Newton, Massachusetts; Nathaniel and Samuel Greenwood, of Boston, Massachusetts; John Greenwood, of Virginia, and Many Later Arrivals in America, also the Early History of the Greenwoods in England, and the Arms They Used (New York: Lyon, 1914), p. 470.

[2] Alfred Nelson Morris, “A Genealogy of the Morris Family with Historical Sketches” (1941, typescript in West Virginia Archives, online at the archives’ website).

[3] See Sangamon County, Illinois, Chancery Court case Morris v. Morris (1845), case file digitized and online at the website, The Papers of Abraham Lincoln maintained by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library; and Martha L. Benner and Cullom Davis, et al., eds., The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln: Complete Documentary Edition, 2d edition (Springfield: Illinois Historic Preservation Agency, 2009), abstracted at the same site.

[4] See FamilySearch database “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” citing the original marriage record in Sangamon County, FHL microfilm 2,132,347.

[5] Morris, “A Genealogy of the Morris Family with Historical Sketches.”

[6] FamilySearch database “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” citing the original marriage record in Sangamon County, FHL microfilm 2,132,344.

[7] 1860 federal census, Sangamon County, Illinois, Fairmount township, Fish Hook post office, p. 520 (family/dwelling 127; 12 September). The surname is spelled Hilliard here.

[8] History of Sangamon County, Illinois; Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages and Townships, etc. (Chicago: Inter-State, 1881), pp. 883.

[9] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 335; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 470.

[10] See FamilySearch database “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” citing the original marriage record in Sangamon County, FHL microfilm 2,132,335.

[11] See Find a Grave memorial page of Thomas Greenwood and of Anna Lindley Greenwood, Sulphur Springs cemetery, Laomi, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by Kathy Kleiber.

[12] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 335.

[13] My information about the children of Thomas Greenwood and Anna Lindley is for the most part from Power, pp. 335-6; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 470-1.

[14] See FamilySearch database “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” citing the original marriage record in Sangamon County, FHL microfilm 2,132,335.

[15] Morris, “A Genealogy of the Morris Family with Historical Sketches.”

[16] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 471.

[17] 1850 federal census, Jackson County, Missouri, Fort Osage, p. 325A (dwelling/family 5; 24 September). 

[18] Jackson County, Missouri, Marriage Bk. 2, p. 14.

[19] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336.

[20] Jackson County, Missouri, Marriage Bk. 3, p. 215.

[21] 1860 federal census, Ray County, Missouri, Crooked River township, Richmond post office, p. 1 (dwelling/family 5; 1 June).

[22] 1870 federal census, Ray County, Missouri, Richmond, p. 523A (dwelling 36/family 38; 23 July). 

[23] See “Morris, Calvary,” Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, online at the U.S. Congress website.

[24] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 471; and History of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 838.

[25] See Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 471; and History of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 838.

[26] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 471; History of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 838; and FamilySearch database “Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1940,” citing the original marriage record in Sangamon County, FHL microfilm 2,132,339.

[27] See Find a Grave memorial page for John Greenwood , Sulphur Springs cemetery, Laomi, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by Kathy Kleiber.

[28] A biography of Fielding M. Neal is in Portrait and Biographical Album of Sangamon County, Illinois (Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1891), pp. 246-7.

[29] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 472.

[30] See Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 471; and Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office.

[31] See Find a Grave memorial page of David Ervin Gibson Sr., Sulphur Springs cemetery, Laomi, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by Pauline.

[32] “Gibson, David E.,” Papers of Abraham Lincoln website maintained by the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, citing Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, pp. 328-9; and the 1860 federal census, Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 253.

[33] On the children of Mary Greenwood and David E. Gibson, see citing Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 328; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, pp. 472-3.

[34] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 474.

[35] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336; Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 474; and Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office.

[36] See Find a Grave memorial page of Edmund Greenwood, Greenwood Farm cemetery, Brashear, Adair County, Missouri, created by ShopGirl with tombstone photos by ShopGirl.

[37] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 336.

[38] Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 474.

[39] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, pp. 336-7; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 474.

[40] Sarah’s tombstone states that she died 12 May 1853 aged 36 years, 6 months, and 10 days: see Find a Grave memorial page for Sarah “Sally” Greenwood Gibson, Gibson cemetery, Curran, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by John Rogers.

[41] See Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office. Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, pp. 473, gives the marriage date as 14 April 1832.

[42] See supra, n. 40.

[43] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 337; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 476.

[44] See Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office.

[45] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 308.

[46] 1850 federal census, Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 175B (dwelling/family 694; 4 October); and 1860 federal census, Solano County, California, Montezuma, Rio Vista post office, p. 375 (dwelling 514/family 444; 7-8 August).

[47] Power, History of the Early Settlers of Sangamon County, Illinois, p. 337; and Greenwood, Greenwood Genealogies 1154-1914, p. 476.

[48] Power and Greenwood (see supra, n. 47) give the marriage date as 4 December 1845, but Illinois Archives’ statewide marriage index online at the website of the Illinois Secretary of State’s office shows the marriage taking place on 5 December.

[49] See Find a Grave memorial page of William V. Greenwood, Sulphur Springs cemetery, Loami, Sangamon County, Illinois, created by mrbrtsn and maintained by Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, with a tombstone photo by mrbrtsn.

2 thoughts on “Children of Ruth Brooks (1775/1780 – 1837) and Husband William Greenwood 

    1. Thank you so much for your comment, Virginia. I’m glad you found my posting helpful, and happy to meet a distant Brooks cousin and descendant of Calvary and Ann. If you spot any mistakes or have additional information, would love to hear about that.

      Like

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