Children of Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth (abt. 1785-1844) and Wife Joicy Jones

In his classic study of the American Hollingsworth family descending from the immigrant ancestor Valentine Hollingsworth, J. Adger Stewart lists five children (all sons) for Benjamin Hollingsworth and Joicy Jones: Stephen Perry; Wyly B.; Benjamin P.; J.B.; and O.W.[2]

In notes she sent me in July 1997, Hollingsworth researcher Melrose Trimble of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, states that the Bledsoe-Kelly Collection at Sanford University library has a 31 May 1949 letter from Maud McLure Kelly to Hugh Stone, which states that Benjamin and Joicy Jones Hollingsworth also had children James, Joicy, Salina, and Isaac Oran, all of whom died before their father made his will.[3] I have not seen this letter, and have seen no information about Joicy and Isaac Oran in other places. Sadie Greening Sparks lists James and Salina in her list of the children of Benjamin and Joicy, noting that she thinks James had the middle name Thomas.[4] Sparks notes that both James and Salina predeceased their father.

Here’s the information I have on the children of Benjamin Hollingsworth and Joicy Jones: 

1. James (Thomas?) Hollingsworth was born about 1810 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died prior to 1 May 1841.[5]

2. Asenath Louisa Hollingsworth was born 10 November 1811 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died after April 1859, probably in either Nacogdoches or Rusk County, Texas. She married Dr. Elijah Allen about 1828 in Franklin County, Tennessee. These dates of birth and death are from Sadie Greening Sparks’s account of the family of Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth and Joicy Jones.[6] Sparks does not provide a source for the birthdate, but states that Sister A.L. Allen (that is, Asenath Louisa Allen) was given a letter of dismission from Union Baptist church in Nacogdoches County, Texas, on the first Saturday in April 1859, and this reference to her in the minutes of that church is the last Sadie Sparks had found for her. She had not found Asenath Allen on the 1860 federal census, and I haven’t been able to locate her on that census, either.

Union Baptist church in Nacogdoches County, which is now called Old North Baptist church, is the oldest Missionary Baptist church in Texas, founded by Mrs. Massey Sparks Millard in 1836.[7] The Old North Church cemetery connected to the church is the oldest Protestant cemetery in Nacogdoches County. Asenath’s daughter Mary Ann and husband Andrew Jackson Sparks are buried in this cemetery.[8] The Sparks family that founded this church descends from William Sparks (1761-1848) and Mary Fielder of Franklin County, Georgia; William is buried in the Old North Church cemetery.[9] Note the Franklin County, Georgia, roots this Sparks family shares with the Hollingsworths.

Asenath Hollingsworth’s husband Dr. Elijah Allen was born in Tennessee on 4 February 1802, and died in Nacogdoches County, Texas, on 13 February 1856.[10] According to Sadie Greening Sparks, in 1841 Elijah Allen was a physician and surgeon for the Third Brigade of Texas Militia, Regiment of Mounted Riflemen, under Brigadier General James Smith.[11]

A note about Asenath Hollingsworth’s name: as we’ve seen, her father’s will spells her name as Arseneth. Sadie Greening Sparks uses the spelling Acenith, which appears on the 1850 federal census, when the family was enumerated in Nacogdoches County.[12] The name is a biblical name, the name of Joseph’s Egyptian wife in Genesis 41:45, and is usually rendered in biblical translations as Asenath. And please don’t get me started on the “Tonisa” that many family trees at Ancestry have decided to add to Asenath’s given names after a census transcriber misread Asenath Louisa for Asenath Tonisa.

Tombstone of Stephen Perry Hollingsworth from his Find a Grave memorial page, Cleburne Memorial cemetery, Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas, created by Weldon Collins, maintained by Strain Armstrong, with a tombstone photo by Chris Easley

3. Stephen Perry Hollingsworth was born 10 May 1814 in Franklin County, Georgia, and died 9 December 1879 in Hood County, Texas. These dates of birth and death are given on his tombstone in Cleburne Memorial cemetery at Cleburne in Johnson County, Texas.[13] The 1880 federal mortality census for Hood County, Texas, states that Stephen died in December 1879 of indigestion, and was born about 1815 in Tennessee.[14] The 1850 federal census gives Stephen’s birthplace as Georgia, however — though the 1860 federal census shows him born in Tennessee.[15] As we’ve seen previously, documents place Stephen P. Hollingsworth’s father Benjamin in Georgia as late as January 1815, and he begins appearing in Franklin County, Tennessee, records only in July 1815, so it seems very likely that Stephen P. Hollingsworth was born in Georgia and not Tennessee.

On 16 September 1845 in Benton County, Alabama, Stephen P. Hollingsworth married Martha Ann Elston, daughter of John C. Elston and Elizabeth Clark.[16] Martha was born 17 September 1831 in Georgia or Alabama, and died 24 January 1916 in Tarrant County, Texas.[17]

A 7 February 1853 act of the Texas legislature shows Stephen P. Hollingsworth authorized to construct a bridge across the Sabine River at any point in Rusk and Harrison Counties between Walling’s Ferry and Ramsdale’s Ferry that he deemed suitable.[18] Stephen also appears in a June 1853 Alabama Supreme Court case, Hollingsworth v. Martin.[19] An unnamed witness who testified in the case when it was brought before the Benton circuit court stated that in 1846 or 1847, Stephen and William B. Martin came to his office on the eve of Stephen’s move to Texas. Martin had had a claim against Stephen dating from Stephen’s settlement of the estates of Wiley B. Hollingsworth or Benjamin Hollingsworth or both. 

Hollingsworth, in return, held a note on Martin to his family’s mercantile firm Hollingsworth & Sons, for about $96, and he allegedly refused to settle with Martin for the claim Martin held against him, which was about the amount of the note, until Martin first paid him. 

Martin claimed he had paid Stephen through Henry L. Martin as Hollingsworth acted as agent for his mother in winding up his father’s estate. A 1 February 1836 receipt Stephen is said to have signed at Tuscaloosa, acknowledging that he had received $100 from H.L. Martin on account of William B. Martin, was exhibited in court to prove that Stephen had been paid by Martin. Stephen went to Texas (in December 1845, to be exact) and the matter was not resolved. The Benton circuit court had found in favor of Stephen P. Hollingsworth, but the state Supreme Court reversed that verdict on the ground that only one witness testified and the evidence offered was therefore insufficient, and the judge had acted erroneously in instructing the jury on the basis of limited evidence.

Lewis E. Daniell, Personnel of the Texas State Government with Sketches of Representative Men of Texas (San Antonio: Maverick, 1892), pp. 122- 4

A biography of Stephen P. Hollingsworth’s son John Elston Hollingsworth (1849-1924) in Lewis E. Daniell’s Personnel of the Texas State Government with Sketches of Representative Men of Texas has important biographical information about Stephen.[20] John E. Hollingsworth was Texas Commissioner of Agriculture. Daniell says that Stephen 

was a pioneer, having immigrated to this State in 1836 and settled in Rusk County. Here he entered upon the practice of his profession, the law, and amassed quite a fortune. It may not be amiss to mention one incident in his life, as it is not only personal, but a matter of unpublished Texas history. When the succession convention of 1861 had passed the succession resolutions, it became necessary for someone to go as a messenger of the convention to the Confederate Congress, then in session at Montgomery, Alabama, and as there were no funds out of which to pay expenses, someone had to be chosen who would bear his own expenses; and Stephen P Hollingsworth was selected, and went as bearer of the dispatches, and returned and made his report, which was copied as part of the convention proceedings, along with the letter addressed to him by Hon. John H Reagan, Postmaster-General of the Confederacy, concerning the mail service, which can be seen by reference to a book now on file in the office of the Secretary of State.

John Elston Hollingsworth and Florence Mauzy Latham, wedding day, 16 June 1874; photo uploaded by John Jernegan to his “Jernegan Everett” tree at Ancestry
John Elston Hollingsworth, photo from a Galveston, Texas, studio; uploaded by John Jernegan to his “Jernegan Everett” tree at Ancestry

According to Memorial and Biographical History of Johnson and Hill Counties, Texas, Stephen and his son John started the first bank in Johnson County in the county seat of Cleburne.[21] As Lewis Daniell’s biography of John Elston Hollingsworth indicates, John studied law at his father’s firm Hollingsworth & Broadus of Henderson, Texas, in 1868-9, then went to law school at Brenham and was licensed to practice. After engaging in the banking business in Cleburne, he entered public service, becoming Postoffice Inspector for Texas in 1885. He was then appointed Commissioner of Agriculture, Insurance, Statistics, and History. Not long before his death in Los Angeles in John Elston Hollingsworth published a book of poetry entitled Thoughts (Los Angeles, 1920).

Memorial and Biographical History of Johnson and Hill Counties, Texas (Chicago: Lewis, 1892), pp. 700-1

4. Wylie/Wyly S. Brooks Hollingsworth was born about 1816 in Franklin County, Tennessee, and died in 1840 in Benton County, Alabama.[22] Wylie/Wyly married Martha Harris on 14 May 1839 in Calhoun County, Alabama.[23] Wylie/Wyly had died by 5 November 1840, when his father Benjamin gave bond with Warren Harris for administration of Wiley’s/Wyly’s estate in Benton County, Alabama.[24]

As noted previously, the 1841 will of Wiley’s/Wyly’s father Benjamin noted that his son had died and states that Wyly had left a son Thomas. A biography of Thomas in Memorial and Biographical History of Johnson and Hill Counties, Texas, states that he was born in Jacksonville, Alabama, in 1840, and was the son of son of Wyly and Martha M. Harris Hollingsworth, natives of Tennessee and Alabama respectively.[25] After the Civil War, in which he served in Peter Forney’s Confederate unit in Alabama, he was a merchant in Jacksonville and then moved to Brazos County, Texas, and to Johnson County in 1870, where he had a large store at Marystown and also farmed. In 1869, he married his cousin Mary E. Hollingsworth, daughter of Stephen Perry Hollingsworth and Martha Ann Elston. 

Wiley was, of course, a common male given name in the period in which Wiley/Wyly Brooks Hollingsworth was born. It’s also possible, though, that Wiley/Wyly was named for a Wyly family of Franklin and Habersham Counties, Georgia, that had connections with the Hollingsworth family from its first generation in Georgia, and which spelled its surname as Wyly.

5. Salina Hollingsworth died young.[26]

Photo of Texana Salina Kelly Scales, daughter of Mary Ann Hollingsworth and William Clark Kelly, uploaded by Glyn Trimble to Texana’s Find a Grave memorial page, Oak Cliff cemetery, Dallas, Texas, created by Ed Kosary and maintained by Laurie Wilhite McDonald
Portrait of Dr. John Russwurm Scales, husband of Texana Salina Kelly, by Glyn Trimble, uploaded to John R. Scales’s Find a Grave memorial page, created by Ed Kosary and maintained by Laurie Wilhite McDonald

6. Mary Ann Hollingsworth was born about 1820 in Franklin County, Tennessee, and died 11 October 1861 in Rusk County, Texas.[27] On 1 August 1839 in Benton County, Alabama, Mary Ann married William Clark Kelly, son of Sims Kelly and Mary Camp.[28] William C. Kelly died prior to July 1864 in Rusk County.[29]

Photo of tombstone of Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth Hayden by KindredWhispers, from Find a Grave memorial page of Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth Hayden, White Rose cemetery, Wills Point, Van Zandt County, Texas, created by KindredWhispers
Photo of tombstone of Charles A. Hayden by KindredWhispers, from Charles’s Find a Grave memorial page, White Rose cemetery, Wills Point, Van Zandt County, Texas, created by KindredWhispers
Photo of tombstone of Charles A. Hayden and Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth Hayden by KindredWhispers, from Find a Grave memorial page of Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth Hayden, White Rose cemetery, Wills Point, Van Zandt County, Texas, created by KindredWhispers

7. Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth was born 18 April 1822 in Franklin County, Tennessee, and died 13 January 1883 in Van Zandt County, Texas.[30] On 13 November 1847 in Rusk County, Texas, Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth married Charles A. Hayden (whose surname also appears as Haden in various records).[31] He was born 19 March 1817 and died 19 January 1905. Both are buried in in White Rose cemetery at Wills Point, Van Zandt County, Texas.[32]

8. Benjamin Porter Hollingsworth was born about 1828 in Franklin County, Tennessee, and died in 1867 in Rusk County, Texas. According to Sadie Greening Sparks, Benjamin was a partner in a law firm with his brother Joseph Benton Hollingsworth in Austin, Texas, under the name of Hollingsworth & Bro.[33] Sparks says that the firm was located at 25, Swenson’s Building in Austin, over Duffau’s drugstore. 

Benjamin was also a partner with Lyne Taliaferro Barret, who produced the first oil well in Texas at Oil Springs in Nacogdoches County. On 21 December 1865, Barret, with business partners Benjamin P. Hollingsworth, Charles A. Hamilton, John T. Flint, and John B. Earle organized the Melrose Petroleum Oil Company, which drilled the Oil Springs well in the summer of 1866.[34]

“J.B. Hollingsworth Dead,” Muskogee Times-Democrat (6 November 1907), p. 3, col. 5
Tombstone of Sarah Carpenter Hollingsworth, Find a Grave memorial page for Sarah Hollingsworth, Brushy Mountain cemetery, Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma, created by Patricia Mechling, maintained by R. Burnett, with a tombstone photo by Peggy Yarbrough

9. Joseph Benton Hollingsworth was born 26 February 1830 in Franklin County, Tennessee, and died 5 November 1907 at Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma.[35] He married Sarah B. Carpenter on 13 January 1859 in Calhoun County, Alabama.[36] Sarah was born 2 September 1835 in Lincoln County, North Carolina, and died 25 September 1899 at Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma. Both are buried in Brushy Mountain cemetery at Muskogee, described in Benton’s death notice in the Muskogee Times-Democrat as an “old family burying ground.”[37] Benton’s grave appears today to be unmarked; Sarah’s has a marker.[38]

As noted above, prior to his move to Oklahoma, Benton Hollingsworth was a partner of his brother Benjamin in the firm Hollingsworth and Bro. in Austin, Texas. 

Biographical Encyclopedia of Texas (New York: Southern, 1880), pp. 189-190
William S. Speer and John H. Brown, The Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United States Biographical Publ. Co., 1881), pp. 190-1

10. Orlando Newton Hollingsworth was born 5 April 1836 in Benton County, Alabama. His date and place of birth are found in a number of biographical accounts,[39] but as Carolyn Hyman’s biography of him in Handbook of Texas states, his date of death is for some reason “unknown.”[40] His biography on the website of Legislative Reference Library of Texas states that he died in 1919 — no month or day is given — but according to Sadie Greening Sparks, he died prior to September 1918.[41] I have not been able to find an obituary or tombstone record. On 4 November 1864 in Rusk County, Texas, Orlando married Ruth Grace Katherine Platner, daughter of Seth C. Platner and Emily A. Frazier.

As the various biographies cited in n. 39 indicate, Orlando Newton Hollingsworth graduated from the University of Virginia in 1859, then enlisted in Company B of the 3rd Texas Cavalry (Cumby’s Company), CSA. He became adjutant of the 3rd Texas Cavalry, and was seriously wounded at Corinth, Mississippi. 

Following the war, he taught at an academy in San Antonio and then founded the Coronal Institute in San Marcos in 1868. He was then admitted to the Texas bar and elected to the state legislature in 1872, becoming Texas Superintendent of Public Instruction in December 1872. From 1876-1884, he served on the State Board of Education, of which he was secretary. He established Texas Journal of Education in 1880.

See the following posting for an addendum to this posting which adds further information that appears to explain what became of Orlando Newton Hollingsworth at the end of his life and why information about the date and place of his death seems difficult to discover: in short, it appears he skipped bail after being arrested in Texas in 1891 and was not seen in Texas after that.


[1] A loose-papers will file for Benjamin Hollingsworth in Calhoun County, Alabama, contains Benjamin’s will: see loose-papers will file of Benjamin Hollingsworth, Calhoun County, Alabama, box 2, folder #55. The will in this probate file appears to be the original will with Benjamin’s signature, though the file also has a letter by Harry Hollingsworth of Inglewood, California, dated 15 April 1986, to the Calhoun County clerk, which states that the original will was held by the Alabama Archives and was a “floating will,” of which he was donating a copy to Calhoun County. I think perhaps the copy Harry Hollingsworth was donating was his transcript of the original will — and the original may now be in the Calhoun County file.

[2] J. Adger Stewart, Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr. (Louisville: Morton, 1925), p. 146.

[3] On Maud McLure Kelly, the first woman to practice law in Alabama and a noted genealogist who worked for the Alabama Archives, see her Wikipedia entry; and Paul McWhorter Pruitt Jr., “Maud McLure Kelly,” Encyclopedia of Alabama online.

[4] Sadie Greening Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas,” online at Loy Sparks’s website dedicated to the memory of Sadie Greening Sparks.

[5] Maud McLure Kelly apparently thought that James died after 1840 in Benton County, Alabama, but note that he is not on the 1840 census in that county. There is a male 30-39 in the household of his father Benjamin Hollingsworth in Benton County in 1840, it should be noted: 1840 federal census, Benton County, Alabama, p. 22. Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas,” simply says that James Thomas Hollingsworth, as she gives his name, died young. She places him first in the list of Benjamin and Joicy’s children.

[6] See ibid.

[7] Samuel B. Hesler, “Old North Baptist Church,” in Handbook of Texas, online at the website of Texas State Historical Association.

[8] See Find a Grave memorial page for Mary Ann Allen Sparks, Old North Church cemetery, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas, created by Matthew Willis and maintained by imagraver.

[9] The Find a Grave memorial page for Col. Richard Sparks, father-in-law of Mary Ann Allen Sparks, Fort Houston cemetery, Palestine, Anderson Co., Texas, contains valuable biographical information about the Sparks family who founded the church. The page was created by flgrl and is maintained by Annette Stone-Kerr.

[10] See Sparks, “The Family of Dr. Elijah Allen & Wife Acenith Louisa Hollingsworth of Nacogdoches Co, Texas,” online at Loy Sparks’s website dedicated to the memory of Sadie Greening Sparks. Sparks states that Elijah Allen died in Rusk County, but I think that he actually died in Nacogdoches County, where William Clark Jr. and Andrew J. Sparks gave bond on 1 April 1856 to administer his estate: Nacogdoches County, Texas, Administrators Bk. B, p. 263.

[11] Sparks, “The Family of Dr. Elijah Allen & Wife Acenith Louisa Hollingsworth of Nacogdoches Co, Texas,” citing Republic of Texas Claims, claim #1945, ID #49862, Texas State Library.

[12] 1850 federal census, Nacogdoches County, Texas, p. 88A (dwelling and family 480; 21 November).

[13] See Find a Grave memorial page of Stephen Perry Hollingsworth, Cleburne Memorial cemetery, Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas, created by Weldon Collins, maintained by Strain Armstrong, with a tombstone photo by Chris Easley.

[14] 1880 federal mortality schedule, Hood County, Texas, precinct 5 (unpaginated). 

[15] 1850 federal census, Rusk County, Texas, p. 239B (dwelling/family 30, 10 September); 1860 federal census, Rusk County, Texas, beat 2, New Linden post office, p. 218 (dwelling 330/family 341; 23 June). Stewart, Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr. p. 146, also thinks that Stephen was born in Franklin County, Tennessee.

[16] Calhoun County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. 1834-1850, p. 148.

[17] Dates are from Martha’s tombstone: see Find a Grave memorial page for Martha Anne Elston Hollingsworth, Cleburne Memorial cemetery, Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas, maintained by Weldon Collins with a tombstone photo by Weldon Collins. See also Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas,” which cites Martha Elston Hollingsworth’s death certificate (Tarrant County, Texas, #2747). Martha’s death certificate gives Alabama as her place of birth, as does the 1860 federal census. The 1850 federal census shows her born in Alabama: on these censuses, see supra, n. 15.

[18] See H.P.N. Gammel, Special Laws of the Fourth Legislature of the State of Texas, vol. 4 (Austin: Gammel, 1853), pp. 21-2.

[19] Alabama Supreme Court, Report of Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Alabama, vol. 23 (Montgomery: J.H. and T.F. Martin, 1854), pp. 591-8.

[20] Lewis E. Daniell, Personnel of the Texas State Government with Sketches of Representative Men of Texas (San Antonio: Maverick, 1892), pp. 122- 4. Note that the biography’s header erroneously gives John the middle initial L.

[21] Memorial and Biographical History of Johnson and Hill Counties, Texas (Chicago: Lewis, 1892), p. 145.

[22] Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.” Sparks thinks that Wiley/Wyly was born in Franklin County, Georgia, but if he was born in 1816, as she proposes, he was more likely born in Franklin County, Tennessee. Stewart, Descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr., p. 146, states that Wyly (the spelling Stewart uses) was born in 1816 and died in 1841 in Alabama. But see the 1840 probate date noted above.

[23] Calhoun County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. 1834-1850, p. 143.

[24] Calhoun County, Alabama, loose-papers estate files, box 5, folder 22, estate of Wiley B. Hollingsworth.

[25] Memorial and Biographical History of Johnson and Hill Counties, Texas (Chicago: Lewis, 1892), pp. 700-1.

[26] See Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.”

[27] See ibid. Sparks cites a Rusk County probate file I have not seen, which may be a probate file for Mary Ann Hollingsworth Kelly: Rusk County, Texas, probate case #696 (March 1862).

[28] Calhoun County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. 1834-1850, p. 180.

[29] See Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.” Sparks cites Rusk County, Texas, probate case #806 (8 July 1864).

[30] Hannah Belzora and husband Charles A. Hayden are buried in White Rose cemetery at Wills Point in Van Zandt County, Texas, with tombstones giving their year and month of birth and death: see Find a Grave memorial page of Hannah Belzora Hollingsworth Hayden, White Rose cemetery, Wills Point, Van Zandt County, Texas, created by KindredWhispers, with tombstone photos by KindredWhispers. See also Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.”

[31] Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.”

[32] See supra, n. 30.

[33] Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.” Sparks indicates that she is citing “Republic of Texas Claims online, Texas State Library.” A search of the digitized Texas Republics Claims files at the Texas State Library does show a number of files that refer to either Benjamin P. Hollingsworth or Hollingsworth & Bro. It’s possible Sparks is referencing one or more of these files, but if so, it’s not clear to me to which files she’s pointing. On Duffau’s drug business in Austin, which was on Congress Avenue, see James Hays McLendon, “Duffau, Francis T. (1808-1871),” in Handbook of Texas at the Texas State Historical Association website; and C. Allan Jones, Texas Roots: Agriculture and Rural Life Before the Civil War (College Station: Texas A & M Univ. Press, 2005), p. 133.

[34] See Linda E. Devereaux, “Barret, Lyne Taliaferro (1832–1913),” in Handbook of Texas at the Texas State Historical Association website; and See also John Folsom, “Oil Springs, TX,” also in Handbook of Texas.

[35] This date of birth is from Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.” Sparks mistakenly has 5 November 1911 as Benton’s death date, but his death notice in Muskogee Times-Democrat (6 November 1907), p. 3, col. 5, entited “J.B. Hollingsworth Dead,” shows him dying 5 November 1911.

[36] Calhoun County, Alabama, Marriage Bk. 1850-1877, p. 181.

[37] See supra, n. 35.

[38] See Find a Grave memorial page for Sarah Hollingsworth, Brushy Mountain cemetery, Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma, created by Patricia Mechling, maintained by R. Burnett, with a tombstone photo by Peggy Yarbrough.

[39] See Carolyn Hyman, “Hollingsworth, Orlando Newton (1836-Unknown),” in Handbook of Texas, online at the Texas State Historical Association website; Biographical Encyclopedia of Texas (New York: Southern, 1880), pp. 189-190; William S. Speer and John H. Brown, The Encyclopedia of the New West (Marshall, Texas: United States Biographical Publ. Co., 1881), pp. 190-1; Sid S. Johnson, Texans Who Wore the Gray, vol. 1 (Tyler: priv. publ., 1907), p. 134; and “Orlando Newton Hollingsworth,” at the Legislative Reference Library of Texas website. 

[40] Carolyn Hyman, “Hollingsworth, Orlando Newton (1836-Unknown),” in Handbook of Texas.

[41] “Orlando Newton Hollingsworth,” at the Legislative Reference Library of Texas website; and Sparks, “The Family of Col. Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth & Wife Joicey Jones of Franklin Co., Georgia, Franklin Co., Tennessee, Benton Co, Alabama, & Rusk Co, Texas.”

One thought on “Children of Benjamin Benton Hollingsworth (abt. 1785-1844) and Wife Joicy Jones

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