Bridget Tobin Ryan (1818-1873) of Co. Kilkenny, Ireland: Records Possibly Pointing to Her Family Members

Tithe Applotment listing for Edd Tobin, Deerpark townland, Rossinan civil parish, County Kilkenny, 1833

Or, Subtitled: In the Absence of Records Necessary to Prove Genealogical Connections, One Goes A-Fishing

In a previous posting, I explained my reasons for concluding that my ancestor Bridget Tobin, who was born in 1818 in County Kilkenny, Ireland, and who married Valentine Ryan, son of John Ryan and Margaret Oates, in Kilmacow parish on 20 January 1833, perhaps had a sister Catherine who married John Walsh in the same parish on 20 January 1833. The same posting notes that Daniel Tobin married Bridget Walsh in Kilmacow parish on 12 February 1832. My posting asks if it’s possible that Daniel Tobin is another sibling of Bridget Tobin Ryan. I also noted that Edmond Tobin married Mary Comerford in Templeorum parish on 23 July 1839, with the marriage record stating that the couple lived at Buckstown. That would place Daniel in the same area as Bridget, Catherine, and Daniel, and would point to the possibility that he could be another sibling of Bridget.

Family of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin of County Kilkenny, Ireland, and Grant County, Arkansas: New Information (2)

Record of the marriage of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin, Kilmacow Catholic parish, County Kilkenny, Ireland, 21 September 1836, from Ossory diocesan transcript of parish records in a microfilm copy at the National Library of Ireland under the title Catholic Parish Registers (microfilm 05028/04)

Or, Subtitled: The Challenge of Teasing Genealogical Clues from Sparse Early 19th-Century Irish Catholic Records

I’ve told you that I have not been able to find information about the family of my 2nd-great-grandmother Bridget Ryan, who married Valentine Ryan in Kilmacow Catholic parish, County Kilkenny, Ireland, on 21 September 1836 with Edmond Hayden and Margaret Fitzgerald as witnesses. The marriage took place at Mullinavat, where Valentine and Bridget lived after marrying, and from which they and their children emigrated to America.

Family of Valentine Ryan and Bridget Tobin of County Kilkenny, Ireland, and Grant County, Arkansas: New Information

Watercolor painting of the ship James Nesmith by artist Duncan McFarlane (1818-1865), online at the invaluable website, from an auction held by Bourgeault-Horan Antiquarians in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in August 2008

Or, Subtitled: Things Are Seldom Quite as Simple as One Would Like in Genealogical Research, Are They?

Throwback Thursday they call it, right? This posting is a throwback to a series of posts I did in April 2018, which began with this posting entitled “In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan.” The series that begins with the linked posting above (you can follow the whole series by clicking on the next posting at the bottom of the page) tracks the roots of Valentine Ryan (1811-1881) and wife Bridget Tobin (1818-1873) of southern County Kilkenny, Ireland. As the series explains, Valentine was the son of John Ryan and Margaret Oates of Templeorum Catholic parish — the family lived in Belline and Rogerstown townland in Fiddown civil parish, at a place in that townland called Logriach or Loughreagh, which is part of Piltown.[1] Margaret,the daughter of John Oates and Eleanor Thompson, was from nearby Tybroughney/Tibberaghny, also part of Piltown. Tybroughney/Tibberaghny is the townland bordering Belline and Rogerstown to the east.

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): The Indentured Servant Years

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Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Or, Subtitled: Strother Ties and Bristol Ties Everywhere You Turn

The Indentured Servant Years

As we’ve seen, Dennis Linchey/Lindsey, the Irish servant indentured in Richmond County, Virginia, on 1 June 1718 whom we’re now tracking, would likely have been born around 1700 — or perhaps a bit before or after that date. We noted that Carol McGinnis indicates that most indentured servants coming to Virginia in this period were young people aged 18 or so, though many were younger.[1] According to Nathan W. Murphy, an expert on indentured servants in Virginia during the colonial period, most indentured servants in Virginia were 15-24 years of age when they began their servitude.[2] Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): The Indentured Servant Years”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Do DNA Work and Prepare for Surprises

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Or, Subtitled: How DNA Findings Can Upend All You Thought You Knew about Your Family

I want to return now to a topic I introduced in May 2018 (and here): the descent of my Lindsey family, classified as group 10 in the International Lindsay Surname Project, from an Irish indentured servant named Dennis Linchey, who arrived in Richmond County, Virginia, by 1 June 1718 aboard the ship The Expectation, and was indentured in August 1718 to Francis Suttle. This first posting in this new series will talk about how DNA findings can completely upend everything you think you know about your family history, and point you in fruitful new directions for researching your actual family history. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Do DNA Work and Prepare for Surprises”