Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Charles Whitlock (abt. 1773 – 1796) and Wife Mary Davies

Augusta County, Virginia, Chancery Court case, Whitlock vs. Whitlock, box 10, file 38 (1803-4), available digitally via Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory chancery records collection

The next child of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and wife Hannah Phillips, their third child if I have their children in correct order, was a son Charles Whitlock. A number of previous postings contain biographical information about Charles. As I state in a previous posting, in my view, Thomas and his siblings were likely raised by their older brother Charles after the Whitlock parents, James Whitlock and Agnes Christmas, died, James in 1749 in Louisa County, Virginia, and Agnes between 1750 and 1757, probably also in Louisa. 

I don’t have documentary proof of my deduction that, as the oldest of James and Agnes’s children, Thomas’s brother Charles brought his younger siblings to Albemarle County, where he lived from 1760 or a bit earlier up to around 1780, when he moved to Surry County, North Carolina. But such information as I have suggests to me that this is what happened. As the posting linked above states, in my view Thomas Whitlock named his only son Charles after the older brother who raised him.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Whitlock vs. Whitlock Chancery Court Case, 1799 – 1805

Undated [1804] survey of Thomas Whitlock’s land, Wythe County, Virginia, in Augusta County, Virginia, Chancery Court case, Whitlock vs. Whitlock, box 10, file 38 (1803-4), available digitally via Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory chancery records collection

Or, Subtitled: In Which I Read the Fusty Old Documents and Summarize Them, Saving You the Trouble

As the previous posting tells you, in this posting I’m going to discuss the lawsuit filed in September 1799 by William Davies, guardian of Agnes and Hannah Whitlock, the orphan daughters of Thomas Whitlock’s son Charles, which ended with Thomas’s sale of his land in Wythe County, Virginia, in 1805 and with his and wife Hannah’s move to Cumberland County, Kentucky.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Wythe County, Virginia, Records, 1790 – 1805

Wythe County, Virginia, Survey Bk. 1, p. 262

Or, Subtitled: Road Orders, Estate Appraisals, and Dams Interfering with Fishing for Catfish

I’m now picking up the story of Thomas Whitlock’s life in 1790, when Wythe County was formed from Montgomery, where Thomas was living from before March 1776. If you click the “previous post” link beneath this posting, that will take you to the posting that precedes this one, and if you want to read the entire series of postings I’ve now written about Thomas Whitlock, simply click “previous posting” at the bottom of each new posting you open in the series.

Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Using unexpected DNA findings (which show that the group of Lindseys from whom I descend have the Irish Type III genetic signature pointing to southwestern Ireland as the family’s pre-American place of origin) in combination with traditional genealogical research methods, a group of us researching my Lindsey line have determined that it’s almost certain the line descends from a Dennis Linchey/Lynch who came to Richmond County, Virginia, in April 1718 as an Irish indentured servant. It has also come to be obvious to me and others that this Dennis tried to patent land in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, after having served his term of indenture, and when he failed at this venture, went to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina, where he acquired land and died in August 1762.  Continue reading “Dennis Linchey & Dennis Lindsey: Strother Family Links Help Establish Connection of Irish Indentured Servant in Virginia (1718) to Edgecombe/Granville County, North Carolina, Settler (1742-1762)”