Additional Notes re: Phillips Families of Granville and Chatham Counties, North Carolina

Jeremiah Phillips, Plat for 400 Acres, Chatham Co. NC, 4 March 1784
Plat for Jeremiah Phillips, 400 Acres, Chatham County, North Carolina, 4 March 1784, Chatham County land grant file 793

Or, Subtitled: Questions Piled on Questions

As a follow-up to my postings about Robert Phillips, who married Margaret, daughter of Dennis Lindsey of Granville County, and about David Phillips (and here), I’d like to share with you now some scattered (and desultory) notes on Phillips families in Granville, Orange, and Chatham Counties, North Carolina. As the two postings I’ve just linked tell you, there are many connections between David Phillips and his kinship network and the kinship network of Dennis Lindsey, and David followed the very same migration path that Dennis followed in the same time frame, from Richmond to Spotsylvania (later Orange) County, Virginia, then to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina (and, in David’s case, finally to Orange County, North Carolina). Continue reading “Additional Notes re: Phillips Families of Granville and Chatham Counties, North Carolina”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)

Orange County Survey, Fry
Survey map of Orange County, Virginia (1736?) in Joshua Fry, Memoir of Col. Joshua Fry (Richmond: Randolph & English, 1880), p. 26, showing fork of Rapidan River.

Or, Subtitled: Recurring Names, Plausible Patterns, and DNA Stumbling Blocks

This is the second half of a two-part set of postings. The first part, which is here, discussed the life of David Phillips in Richmond and Spotsylvania-Orange Counties, Virginia, prior to his move to North Carolina in 1742. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (1)

Farnham Church, Richmond County, Virginia
Farnham Episcopal church, Richmond County, Virginia, from George Carrington Mason, Colonial Churches of Tidewater Virginia (Richmond, Va.: Whittet and Shepperson, 1945), at the “North Farnham Parish, Virginia, Genealogy” page at FamilySearch. The file is available for online sharing with a Creative Commons license. The parish dates from 1663; the present church was built around 1737 and went through several restorations in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Or, Subtitled: Interrelated Families, Same Migration Patterns, DNA Surprises 

As a follow-up to my previous posting about Dennis Lindsey’s daughter Margaret and her husband Robert Phillips, I want to post some notes about another Phillips family living in Granville (and later Orange) County, North Carolina, when Robert and Margaret lived there. This is the family of David Phillips, who was born about 1700 in North Farnham parish in Richmond County, Virginia. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (1)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Catherine Lindsey and Husband Roger Thornton

Hancock GA WB A, 225
Will of Roger Thornton, Hancock County, Georgia, Will Bk. A, p. 225
Hancock GA WB A, 226
Will of Roger Thornton, Hancock County, Georgia, Will Bk. A, p. 226

Or, Subtitled: When Eastern North Carolina Moves to Georgia — Featherbeds and Land Grants

In my next series of articles about the family of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762), who came as a young indentured servant from Ireland to Richmond County, Virginia, in 1718 and died in Granville County, North Carolina, in 1762, I’m going to tell you what I know of his children. This first article in the series focuses on Dennis’ daughter Catherine and her husband Roger Thornton. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Catherine Lindsey and Husband Roger Thornton”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762

Sugar Jones' Militia List Eaton's Company 1754
“Granville County: Muster roll of Colonel William Eaton’s Regiment,” in “Troop Returns, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, RG 5864; digitized online at the state archives’ Digital Records Collection.

Or, Subtitled: Yows, Weathers, Working Tules, Indiorn Corn, and Shillings Starling

An assortment of deed, tax, and other records in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 1750s and 1760s provides an interesting snapshot of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life. In 1750, he appears twice on Granville County tax lists, once in Edward Jones’ district and once in John Brantley’s. As we’ve seen, it was from Jones that he first bought land on Isinglass Creek in Edgecombe (later Granville) County in 1744. And he sold that piece of land to John Brantley in November 1746, just after buying a tract on Sandy Creek. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in Virginia

Virginia Statute, Irish Indentured Servants
William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large, Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619 (New York: Bartow, 1823), vol. 1, p. 411.

Or, Subtitled: A Failed Attempt to Patent Land, and Suits of Debt

To recap (and link to the two previous postings in this series [here and here]): as Brendan Wolfe and Martha McCartney tell us, the indenture of Irish servants in colonial Virginia was subject to a law that required Irish servants in the colony arriving without indenture papers to serve six years if they were above sixteen, and up to their twenty-fourth year in any case.[1] Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in Virginia”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): The Indentured Servant Years

cropped-dennis-lindsey-1762-will-p1a-copy.jpg
Will of Dennis Lindsey, Granville County, North Carolina, August 1762 (in Granville County Loose-Papers Estate Files, North Carolina Archives, C.R. 044.801.25)

Or, Subtitled: Strother Ties and Bristol Ties Everywhere You Turn

The Indentured Servant Years

As we’ve seen, Dennis Linchey/Lindsey, the Irish servant indentured in Richmond County, Virginia, on 1 June 1718 whom we’re now tracking, would likely have been born around 1700 — or perhaps a bit before or after that date. We noted that Carol McGinnis indicates that most indentured servants coming to Virginia in this period were young people aged 18 or so, though many were younger.[1] According to Nathan W. Murphy, an expert on indentured servants in Virginia during the colonial period, most indentured servants in Virginia were 15-24 years of age when they began their servitude.[2] Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): The Indentured Servant Years”