“In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan”: Irish Roots of Ryan Family, Grant County, Arkansas (2)

1856_G_W_Cotton
County Kilkenny, Ireland, G.W. Cotton Map, 1856

In my first posting in this series, I began telling you how, after years of searching, I eventually located the specific place in County Kilkenny, Ireland, from which my Ryan ancestors emigrated to America in 1852-3. My family had long known that Valentine  Ryan and his wife Bridget, my great-great-grandparents, brought their family from County Kilkenny to the U.S. — but precisely where they had lived in County Kilkenny, we had forgotten. Continue reading ““In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan”: Irish Roots of Ryan Family, Grant County, Arkansas (2)”

“In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan”: Irish Roots of Ryan Family, Grant County, Arkansas (1)

Valentine Ryan Tombstone
Valentine Ryan Tombstone, Orion Cemetery, Grant County, Arkansas

In two previous postings in my series about Patrick Ryan (here and here), I’ve shared a few pieces of information about Pat’s Irish roots. As I told you in those postings (the first link has a copy of his baptismal record), his parents were Valentine Ryan (1810-1881) and Bridget Tobin (1818-1873), who married 21 September 1836 in Kilmacow Catholic parish, County Kilkenny, Ireland. Following their marriage and up to their emigration to America in 1852-1853, Val and Biddy Ryan lived in Buckstown, a sort of “suburb” of the town of Mullinavat in southern County Kilkenny (and I’ll explain more about that later). Continue reading ““In Memory of Valentine Ryan, Born in Co. Kilkenny, Ireland, Feb. 23, 1810, Died Feb. 22, 1881. Erected by his son Patrick Ryan”: Irish Roots of Ryan Family, Grant County, Arkansas (1)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (3)

Ryan, Patrick Union Pension File (3)
Patrick Ryan, Disability Affidavit, 19 Nov. 1892 (invalid’s pension, South Division, #1107789).

And now to that missing eye: though I have not spelled this out, it has probably become obvious to you if you’ve read the first two installments in this series that it is, in part, an extended essay about the importance of family stories in genealogical research. It’s a foray into understanding how family stories should be handled. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (3)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (2)

Ryan, Patrick Union Service Record
Patrick Ryan Civil War Service record, NARA, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Arkansas, RG 94, M399: Compiled service records of volunteer Union soldiers who served in organizations from the State of Arkansas

“So how did Pat Ryan lose that eye in the Civil War?” you ask. Well, I’ll tell you. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (2)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (1)

Ryan, Patrick Death, 19 Oct 1893, Pine Bluff Daily Graphic, p. 1, col. 3
Pine Bluff [Arkansas] Daily Graphic, 19 Oct. 1893, p. 1, col. 3.

I’ve just shared postings tracing all I’ve been able to discover about an elusive Ulster Scots ancestor, David Dinsmore, who came from Ireland to South Carolina with his wife Margaret not long before the Revolution, took the British side during that war, and found himself exiled to Nova Scotia, leaving his wife and children behind in South Carolina. The backstory to those postings is that, for many years, my FGS for this family had neatly written, in the slot next to David’s date and place of death, the statement, “Prob. died young.” Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (1)”