The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Notes on the Possible (?) or Probable (?) Pett Ancestry

Phineas Pett
Phineas Pett, portrait by unknown artist from the National Portrait Gallery, London; on the Wikimedia Commons copy of this image, which I’ve used here, see below.

Or, Subtitled: Fatal Matches and Cruel Step-Parents

It’s time for me to draw this long, long series of postings on the Nottingham ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860) to a close. As I’ve told you in my last several postings, an English researcher of the Virginia Nottingham family, Cedric Nottingham, has concluded that the father of Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) was a Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650) born in Ipswich, County Suffolk, England, who married (he proposes) Mary, daughter of Peter Pett and Elizabeth Thornton, and spent his adult life as a merchant in London. Cedric Nottingham traces this Nottingham line back a number of generations to a John Nottingham who died in Bury St Edmunds, County Suffolk, England, in 1439. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Notes on the Possible (?) or Probable (?) Pett Ancestry”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1546-1626)

Nottingham, Richard, Burial 1626, St. Dunstan and All Saints
Richard Nottingham’s burial record, 10 October 1626, St. Dunstan and All Saints church, Stepney; London Metropolitan Archives, Church of England Parish Registers, 1538-1812 (P93/DUN/277)

Or, Subtitled: London, Ships, and Colonial Virginia

At the end of my previous posting, I told you that, since there were two Richard Nottinghams living and doing business at the same time in Stepney in the east end of London in the early 1600s, an uncle and his nephew, it’s important to distinguish these two men from each other, as we try to unravel the ancestry of Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692), the immigrant ancestor of the Northampton County, Virginia, Nottingham family. As my previous posting explains, a researcher of the Nottingham family in England, Cedric Nottingham, proposes in his monograph “The Nottingham Surname: The Virginian Connection” that the Virginia Richard Nottingham is son of the younger of those two Richard Nottinghams living in Stepney in the early 1600s, a Richard Nottingham born in 1587 in Ipswich who appears to have died in Stepney in the 1640s. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1546-1626)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650)

Ancestry of Richard Nottingham of Virginia, Per Cedric Nottingham
Chart of the ancestry of Richard Nottingham, immigrant to Northampton County, Virginia, as outlined by Cedric Nottingham, “The Nottingham Surname: The Virginian Connection

Or, Subtitled: The Ifs, Ands, and Buts of Establishing a Pedigree for 17th-Century Virginia Immigrants

When it comes to pinning down the pre-Virginia origins of the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family of Northampton County, Virginia, Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692), there are many ifs, ands, and buts. To my knowledge, the only researcher who has worked intensively on this project is Cedric Nottingham, to whom I introduced readers in a previous posting. In his monograph “The Nottingham Surname: The Virginian Connection,” he relates how, after assiduous research, he, his wife Christine, and his brother Tom came to the conclusion that it’s very likely Richard Nottingham of Northampton County, Virginia, is the son of an older Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650), a merchant of Stepney in the east end of London whose roots lie in Ipswich in County Suffolk. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (4)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)
Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (bottom)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (bottom)
Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 211
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 211

Or, Subtitled: When London Is Transplanted to Virginia’s Eastern Shore

Now to end our chronicle of the life of Richard Nottingham, the immigrant ancestor of that family in Northampton County, Virginia: Richard made his will 24 September 1692, and it was proven in Northampton court on 29 November 1692.[1] Here’s my transcript of the will: Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (4)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (3)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: Boys and Wenches Running Wild in the Streets of London: Off to Virginia with Them!

In our last posting, we got the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family — Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) — to Northampton County, Virginia. In this posting, I’d like to tell you about his life there insofar as we have documentary evidence of it up to his death between 24 September 1692, when he made his will, and 29 November 1692, when his will was probated. I’ll discuss the will in my final (that is, next) posting about Richard Nottingham. Here are the data I have: Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (3)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: “Wee the Inhabitants of Northampton Countie Doe Complayne”

In my last posting, I introduced you to the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family in Northampton County, Virginia, Richard Nottingham, who was born in England around 1618-1621. I told you that various published accounts of his pre-Virginia life, some of them echoing longstanding tales in the Nottingham family, suggest that he came to Virginia after the defeat of Charles I in 1646, that he arrived with a wife who had the title of Lady and is identified in family stories as Elizabeth Hatton or Hutton, that he came overseas bringing a large sum of money, and that he bought a large tract of land soon after his arrival in Virginia. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (1)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: A Mythical Lady and a Fat Purse of Sovereigns

The immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family of Northampton County, Virginia, and father of the William Nottingham (1669-1719) I discussed previously, was Richard Nottingham. Richard was born in England about 1618-1621. In a July 1658 deposition he made in Northampton County court, he stated that he was 40 years of age. When he deposed in county court in July 1681, he gave his age as 60.[1] As we’ll see when we move to a discussion of factual information about Richard’s life, he was definitely in Northampton County by 1651, and some sources suggest that he may have been there between 1645 and 1650. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (1)”

An Account of the Life of George Monk (abt. 1707-1744), Northampton County, Virginia

Northampton County Courthouse
The 1899 Northampton County Courthouse (left) and earlier 1732 Courthouse on the historic court green in Eastville, Virginia; by JodyMBrummage, who has kindly uploaded the photo to Wikimedia Commons for online sharing.

We interrupt this regularly scheduled program to….

With my last posting, I told you I had finished sharing what I know of my Northampton County, Virginia, Monk line back to William Monk, who died there before July 1716. I also stated that I was now going to trace the Nottingham line that intersects with my Monk line in Northampton County, and I began that series by telling you what I know of William Nottingham (1669-1719), whose daughter Elizabeth (1700-1749/1750) married William Monk (abt. 1690-1750).

In my series on my Northampton County Monks, I have traced that line back to the father of William Monk who married Elizabeth Nottingham. He, too, was named William, and is the man who died before July 1716 in Northampton County. I have suggested to youthough this is only a guess!— that this William Monk might be the son of either Edward or William Monk, both immigrants to Northampton County by 1640/1. The immigrant William died by 1655 in Northampton County, and he seems to me the likelier candidate to be the father of the William Monk who died in 1716, and who was born in the 1660s, it appears. Continue reading “An Account of the Life of George Monk (abt. 1707-1744), Northampton County, Virginia”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)

Northampton County, Virginia, Courthouse, 1731
Northampton County, Virginia, courthouse (built in 1731), with yours truly standing beside it, 1991.

Or, Subtitled: A World of Goodwives and “Hay Dogg, Hay Dogg”

In my previous posting, I explained why I’m confident that a William Monk and William Monk Jr. who witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer in Northampton County, Virginia, on 19 February 1708/9[1] are a father and son, and why I’m also confident that William Jr. is the man of that name who died in 1750 in Northampton County with wife Elizabeth, daughter of William and Mary Nottingham. To review my reasons for reaching these conclusions, please click the link I’ve provided and read my previous posting. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (d. 1716)”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)

Monk, William, Northampton Co., Va., Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, 1740-50, p. 531 (1)
Will of William Monk, Northampton County, Virginia, Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, p. 531 (part 1).

Or, Subtitled: Hand Mills, Small Swords, and Beds and Bolsters

In my last posting, I pointed you to the 18 September 1749 will of William Monk in Northampton County, Virginia, to show you that Nottingham Monk, who died before 20 July 1793 in Bertie County, North Carolina, was William’s son: the will names him as such.[1] The first record I find of William Monk in Northampton County is in another will: on 19 February 1708/9 William Munk and William Munk Jr. witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer, along with Robert Howsen and William Dyer.[2] The two Monk men signed by mark. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)”