Children of Charles Whitlock (abt. 1773 – 1796) and Wife Mary Davies: Hannah Whitlock (1795 – 1860/1870) and Husband James Calfee (1795 – 1858)

James Calfee house, Glenwood Park near Princeton, Mercer County, West Virginia; photo uploaded by woodm132 to “Webb/Kelly/Pack/Calfee Family Tree” at Ancestry

This posting continues my discussion of the two daughters of Charles Whitlock and wife Mary Davies — Agnes, who married John Grayson; and Hannah, who married James Calfee. I began this discussion with this previous posting discussing Agnes and her husband John Grason. In what follows, I’ll discuss Hannah Whitlock, her husband James Calfee, and their family.

Children of Charles Whitlock (abt. 1773 – 1796) and Wife Mary Davies: Agnes Whitlock (1793 – 1858) and Husband John Grayson

Bland County, Virginia, Will Bk. 1, pp. 361-2

As my last posting states, Charles Whitlock and wife Mary Davies had two daughters, Agnes and Hannah, who are named in the Whitlock vs. Whitlock chancery court case file documenting the lawsuit their mother’s uncle William Davies filed on their behalf in Wythe County, Virginia, in September 1799.[1] An 8 May 1798 Wythe County court minute noting the appointment of the same great-uncle as their guardian also names Agnes and Hannah as Charles Whitlock and Mary Davies’s daughters.[2] As these documents indicate, Agnes and Hannah were minors when their father Charles died in April 1796 in Wythe County.

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Charles Whitlock (abt. 1773 – 1796) and Wife Mary Davies

Augusta County, Virginia, Chancery Court case, Whitlock vs. Whitlock, box 10, file 38 (1803-4), available digitally via Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory chancery records collection

The next child of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and wife Hannah Phillips, their third child if I have their children in correct order, was a son Charles Whitlock. A number of previous postings contain biographical information about Charles. As I state in a previous posting, in my view, Thomas and his siblings were likely raised by their older brother Charles after the Whitlock parents, James Whitlock and Agnes Christmas, died, James in 1749 in Louisa County, Virginia, and Agnes between 1750 and 1757, probably also in Louisa. 

I don’t have documentary proof of my deduction that, as the oldest of James and Agnes’s children, Thomas’s brother Charles brought his younger siblings to Albemarle County, where he lived from 1760 or a bit earlier up to around 1780, when he moved to Surry County, North Carolina. But such information as I have suggests to me that this is what happened. As the posting linked above states, in my view Thomas Whitlock named his only son Charles after the older brother who raised him.

Children of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) and Wife Hannah Phillips: Daughter Who Married William Hannah

Original will of John Hanna, 15 April 1793, Surry County, North Carolina, on file with the North Carolina state archives, available digitally at FamilySearch

I’m now resuming my chronicle of the life and family of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Virginia and Kentucky, which I interrupted in the past several weeks to report on new information I discovered on a trip to the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, most of it having to do with my Lindsey and Brooks lines, which connect to Thomas Whitlock’s family through the marriage of his daughter Sarah to Thomas Brooks, and the marriage of Thomas and Sarah Whitlock’s daughter Jane to Dennis Lindsey.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Whitlock vs. Whitlock Chancery Court Case, 1799 – 1805

Undated [1804] survey of Thomas Whitlock’s land, Wythe County, Virginia, in Augusta County, Virginia, Chancery Court case, Whitlock vs. Whitlock, box 10, file 38 (1803-4), available digitally via Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory chancery records collection

Or, Subtitled: In Which I Read the Fusty Old Documents and Summarize Them, Saving You the Trouble

As the previous posting tells you, in this posting I’m going to discuss the lawsuit filed in September 1799 by William Davies, guardian of Agnes and Hannah Whitlock, the orphan daughters of Thomas Whitlock’s son Charles, which ended with Thomas’s sale of his land in Wythe County, Virginia, in 1805 and with his and wife Hannah’s move to Cumberland County, Kentucky.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Wythe County, Virginia, Records, 1790 – 1805

Wythe County, Virginia, Survey Bk. 1, p. 262

Or, Subtitled: Road Orders, Estate Appraisals, and Dams Interfering with Fishing for Catfish

I’m now picking up the story of Thomas Whitlock’s life in 1790, when Wythe County was formed from Montgomery, where Thomas was living from before March 1776. If you click the “previous post” link beneath this posting, that will take you to the posting that precedes this one, and if you want to read the entire series of postings I’ve now written about Thomas Whitlock, simply click “previous posting” at the bottom of each new posting you open in the series.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Montgomery County, Virginia, Records, 1780s

Virginia Land Office Survey Bk. 4, pp. 654-5

Or, Subtitled: In which I share information strongly supporting the conclusion that the Thomas Whitlock of the 7th Virginia Regiment is, indeed, this Thomas — see discussion of Capt. Robert Sayers below.

In this posting, I’m continuing my chronicle of the life of Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) in Montgomery County, Virginia, insofar as I’ve found documents there for him. Previous postings have tracked him from the time he appears in Montgomery County in March 1776 witnessing a deed of Jonathan Jennings to Charles Lynch (and here and here). The last link I’ve just provided points to a posting that ends with a discussion of Thomas’s appearance on a 6 April 1781 list of men serving in Jeremiah Pearce/Pierce’s battalion in Montgomery County.

Thomas Whitlock (abt. 1745 – 1830) of Louisa and Wythe Counties, Virginia, and Cumberland County, Kentucky: Montgomery County, Virginia, Records, 1777 – 1781

Mary B. Kegley, Early Adventurers on the Western Waters, vol. 3 (Wytheville: Kegley Books, 1995), pp. 334-5

As the previous posting told you, I’ll now begin sharing the information I have about Thomas Whitlock’s years in Montgomery and Wythe Counties, Virginia, from 1776 to 1805, when he and wife Hannah moved to Cumberland County, Kentucky, from Wythe County, Virginia. Wythe was formed from Montgomery in 1790, and Thomas’s land fell into Wythe County at that point.

Children of Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747 – 1805) and Wife Margaret: Margaret Brooks (1772 – 1857) and Husband Joseph Day (2)

History of Daviess County, Kentucky, Together with Sketches of Its Cities, Villages, and Townships, etc. (Chicago: Inter-State, 1883), p. 535

Or, Subtitled: A Family Clearly Illustrating the Genetic Tendencies to Twins in Brooks Lines

This posting is a continuation of a previous discussion of Margaret Brooks (1772-1857), daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Beaumont/Beamon) Brooks of Frederick and Wythe Counties, Virginia. As the article to which the link points tells you, around 1790, Margaret married Joseph Day (1768-1855), son of Joseph and Catherine Yarnall Day of Frederick and Botetourt Counties, Virginia. The previous posting focuses on the family of Joseph and Margaret Brooks Day up to 1804, when they moved from Botetourt County to Kentucky. This posting begins the chronicle of their lives with the move to Kentucky.

Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747-1805): Wythe County, Virginia Years, 1793-1805

Will of Thomas Brooks, 4 November 1804, Wythe County, Virginia, Wythe County, Virginia, Will Bk. 1, pp. 308-9

Or, Subtitled: Fertile New Land, Lead Mines, Shot Towers and Forges, and Movement from the Middle Colonies into the Valley of Virginia

With my first posting about Thomas Brooks (abt. 1747-1805), I shared my information about Thomas’s life in Frederick County, Virginia, up to 1792, when he moved his family to Wythe County, Virginia. My account begins with a March 1767 deed of Patrick Rice to his son John, which Thomas witnessed, the first certain record I have of him in Frederick County. Since, as my posting indicates, I have not found information about Thomas’s father, I haven’t been able to track this family line sufficiently to say with any certainty where Thomas Brooks was born — a point to which I’ll return when I discuss in more detail the information I have about Thomas’s mother Mary, who made her will in Frederick County on 9 July 1786, with the will being probated on 4 April 1787.