“In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191 copy
Hardin County, Tennessee, Entry Bk. 1, Feb. 1820-June 1835, pp. 191-2.

Cherry, Daniel, 274 Acre Survey, Hardin County Entry Bk.1 Feb. 1820-June 1835, p192 copy

In my previous posting with this title, I told you I’d continue the story I began with it, which is about how, when I obtained a copy of the 1837 deed in which Daniel Cherry, a brother of my 3-great-grandmother Talitha Cherry Monk (1790-1860), loaned a piece of land to Talitha and her husband Strachan Monk (1787-abt. 1858), I then did a search of 19th-century land records in Hardin County, Tennessee. As I noted in my last posting, what I found when I did that search has provided me with illuminating information about an eastern North Carolina kinship network that settled on the Tennessee River in southwest Hardin County, Tennessee, soon after 1820. Continue reading ““In Consideration of the Love and Good Will I Have and Do Bear Towards My Sister Telitha Monk”: Daniel Cherry, Strachan and Talitha Cherry Monk, and What Land Records Can Teach Us (2)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)

Mendelsohn The Lost

This will be my final posting in this series about Patrick Ryan (1846-1893) and his Civil War pension file. If you’re just discovering this blog, you may want to read the whole series of which this is the final piece. What I want to do now is provide some footnotes to  previous postings in the series. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (9)”

Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (6)

Lawrence C. Byrd, Death Record, Union Service Packet
Lawrence Cherry Byrd, Civil War Service Record, NARA, M399, Compiled Service Records of Volunteer Union Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Arkansas, Personal Papers; RG 94, Carded Records Showing Military Service of Soldiers Who Fought in Volunteer Organizations During the American Civil War, compiled 1890 – 1912, documenting the period 1861 – 1866.

As I ended my last posting about the Civil War pension claims filed by Patrick Ryan and his widow Delilah Rinehart Ryan in Grant County, Arkansas, I mentioned that one of the threads tying together the network of families represented in these combined pension files is that men from several of these families were Union soldiers during the war —in a state that seceded from the Union, from families living in the central and southern part of Arkansas where Confederate sentiment was stronger than it was in the northern half of the state. As we’ve seen, Pat Ryan’s first wife Rosanna Hill Spann was the widow of John H. Spann, who served in the 3rd Arkansas Cavalry along with Pat Ryan, as did John Spann’s brother James Jasper Spann, who enlisted in Little Rock in Co. K of this Union unit on the same day that Pat Ryan did, 8 November 1863. Continue reading “Prob. Died Young, Or How Pat Ryan Lost His Eye (As a Union Soldier) (6)”