The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)

Spartanburg County 1825 Mills Atlas Map, Library of Congress
Robert Mills, “Spartanburgh District, South Carolina,” from Mills’ Atlas of the State of South Carolina (Baltimore: F. Lucas, Jr., 1825); in the Library of Congress, call number G3913.S7 1820.M5, and digitized at the LOC website

Or, Subtitled: A Reminder of How Much We Can Learn from Migration Patterns and Land Records

Settling in South Carolina

By July 1768, William Lindsey was claiming land north of the Enoree River in what would later become Spartanburg County, South Carolina. For those interested in the currents of migration that brought early settlers to Spartanburg County, a good research aid is Frank Scott’s essay entitled “Migrations into Spartanburg Co.” at the SCGenweb site for Spartanburg County. As Scott notes, “After the French and Indian War, the Snow Campaign and a treaty that ceded the Cherokees’ claim to Spartanburg County, the area was finally opened to permanent settlement.” This brought an influx of settlers to the area between 1765-1770. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806) (2)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)

Orange County Survey, Fry
Survey map of Orange County, Virginia (1736?) in Joshua Fry, Memoir of Col. Joshua Fry (Richmond: Randolph & English, 1880), p. 26, showing fork of Rapidan River.

Or, Subtitled: Recurring Names, Plausible Patterns, and DNA Stumbling Blocks

This is the second half of a two-part set of postings. The first part, which is here, discussed the life of David Phillips in Richmond and Spotsylvania-Orange Counties, Virginia, prior to his move to North Carolina in 1742. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (2)”

The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (1)

Farnham Church, Richmond County, Virginia
Farnham Episcopal church, Richmond County, Virginia, from George Carrington Mason, Colonial Churches of Tidewater Virginia (Richmond, Va.: Whittet and Shepperson, 1945), at the “North Farnham Parish, Virginia, Genealogy” page at FamilySearch. The file is available for online sharing with a Creative Commons license. The parish dates from 1663; the present church was built around 1737 and went through several restorations in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Or, Subtitled: Interrelated Families, Same Migration Patterns, DNA Surprises 

As a follow-up to my previous posting about Dennis Lindsey’s daughter Margaret and her husband Robert Phillips, I want to post some notes about another Phillips family living in Granville (and later Orange) County, North Carolina, when Robert and Margaret lived there. This is the family of David Phillips, who was born about 1700 in North Farnham parish in Richmond County, Virginia. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Margaret Lindsey and Robert Phillips — Notes about David Phillips (1)”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762

Sugar Jones' Militia List Eaton's Company 1754
“Granville County: Muster roll of Colonel William Eaton’s Regiment,” in “Troop Returns, Military Collection, State Archives of North Carolina, RG 5864; digitized online at the state archives’ Digital Records Collection.

Or, Subtitled: Yows, Weathers, Working Tules, Indiorn Corn, and Shillings Starling

An assortment of deed, tax, and other records in Granville County, North Carolina, in the 1750s and 1760s provides an interesting snapshot of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life. In 1750, he appears twice on Granville County tax lists, once in Edward Jones’ district and once in John Brantley’s. As we’ve seen, it was from Jones that he first bought land on Isinglass Creek in Edgecombe (later Granville) County in 1744. And he sold that piece of land to John Brantley in November 1746, just after buying a tract on Sandy Creek. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina, 1750-1762”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750 — A Correction of Some Errors

 

Detail from Compleat map of North Carolina, 1770, showing Sandy Creek
A detail from John Collet, J. Bayly, and S. Hooper, A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey (London: S. Hooper, 1770), in the North Carolina Collection Gallery at University of North Carolina Chapel Hill

At the end of my last posting, I told you I’d move on to an account of the final decade of Dennis Lindsey’s life, ending with his death in Granville County, North Carolina, in August 1762. I now find that before I do that, I need to correct some mistakes I made in that previous posting. I’m going to point them out to you now, and I’ll also revise the posting itself to correct the errors, since others who may not see my corrections here may circulate or rely on that previous posting. Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750 — A Correction of Some Errors”