The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Dennis Lindsey (1794 – 1836) (3)

Oakville Incorporation, Alabama Legislature, Acts 1833, #8, p. 57
9 December 1833 act of Alabama legislature incorporating town of Oakville, Lawrence County, Alabama, and naming Dennis Lindsey (Lindsay) with William Hodges and Samuel White to hold election for town officers (Alabama Legislature Acts 1833, #8, p. 57)

Or, Subtitled: Legends of Witches, Native American Curses, and Drowned Towns

In this posting, I’ll discuss the records I’ve found tracking Dennis Lindsey from 1830 to his death in 1836. Almost all of these records are from Lawrence County, Alabama, where he had settled in 1817 when the area was still Madison County in Mississippi Territory. The following are records I’ve found for Dennis Lindsey from 1830 up to his death on 28 August 1836: Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Dennis Lindsey (1794 – 1836) (3)”

The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: David Dinsmore Lindsey (1815 – 1873)

 

Lindsey, David Dinsmore, Moulton Advertiser, 22 Dec 1908, p. 1, col. 5-6 (1)
S.W. Barbee, “Old Lawrence Reminiscent,” Moulton Advertiser (22 December 1908), p. 1, col. 5-6 (1)

Or, Subtitled: Irish Linen, Thirst for Red Liquor, and a Loyalist Grandfather

Now to the last of the children of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore, their son David Dinsmore Lindsey (after which I’ll turn to Dennis, their oldest son): Mark and Mary Jane’s last child was named for Mary Jane’s father and, like his brothers Burke and Wesley, was called by his middle name. As we found when I did a series of postings about David Dinsmore previously, David was an Ulster Scots immigrant who arrived with wife Margaret in Charleston, South Carolina, on 10 December 1767. The couple sailed from Belfast aboard The Earl of Donegal, and immediately after their arrival in South Carolina, claimed land under the Bounty Act in what was then Craven County (and by 1769, Ninety-Six District) and would later become Spartanburg County. The Earl of Donegal’s passenger list states that David was aged 17 in 1767. (I’ve provided links to the six postings in my series about David Dinsmore at the end of this posting.) Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: David Dinsmore Lindsey (1815 – 1873)”

The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Fielding Wesley Lindsey (1813 – 1868)

Lindsey, Fielding W., Barbee, Old Lawrence Reminiscent,Moulton Advertiser (20 April 1909), p. 1, col. 2-4 (1)
S.W. Barbee, “Old Lawrence Reminiscent,” Moulton Advertiser (20 April 1909), p. 1, col. 2-4 (1)

Or, Subtitled: I “Am Indebted to Oakville Whiskey and ‘Wes’ Lindsey,” and Murder of a Brother-in-Law of a “Bullying Nature”

Now to move on to another of the children of Mark Lindsey and Mary Jane Dinsmore, their fourth child, Fielding Wesley Lindsey. His tombstone in the Lindsey cemetery near Speake in Lawrence County, Alabama, states that he was born 11 December 1813 and died 21 March 1868.[1] Speake, which is named after James Beckham Speake, who married Sarah Brooks Lindsey, daughter of Wesley Lindsey’s brother Dennis and wife Jane Brooks, is 2.7 miles south of Oakville, where Dennis lived and where Mark and Mary Jane Lindsey are buried in a family cemetery along with Dennis and Jane Lindsey. Continue reading “The Children of Mark Lindsey (1774-1848) and Mary Jane Dinsmore: Fielding Wesley Lindsey (1813 – 1868)”