The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton

Ephraim Clanton Revolutionary Audit File (4)
South Carolina Revolutionary pay indent to Ephraim Clanton, Camden District, 7 July 1786, in South Carolina Revolutionary Audited Accounts, file 1252A

Or, Subtitled: Tracking 18th-Century Families from Surry County, Virginia, to Granville County, North Carolina, to Kershaw County, South Carolina 

I now want to introduce you to another child of Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762) — his daughter Elizabeth, who married Ephraim Clanton. Though I’m really introducing you primarily to Ephraim, since I have found no information about Elizabeth beyond her listing as a daughter of Dennis Lindsey in his August 1762 will in Granville County, North Carolina…. Continue reading “The Children of Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Elizabeth Lindsey and Husband Ephraim Clanton”

Additional Notes re: Phillips Families of Granville and Chatham Counties, North Carolina

Jeremiah Phillips, Plat for 400 Acres, Chatham Co. NC, 4 March 1784
Plat for Jeremiah Phillips, 400 Acres, Chatham County, North Carolina, 4 March 1784, Chatham County land grant file 793

Or, Subtitled: Questions Piled on Questions

As a follow-up to my postings about Robert Phillips, who married Margaret, daughter of Dennis Lindsey of Granville County, and about David Phillips (and here), I’d like to share with you now some scattered (and desultory) notes on Phillips families in Granville, Orange, and Chatham Counties, North Carolina. As the two postings I’ve just linked tell you, there are many connections between David Phillips and his kinship network and the kinship network of Dennis Lindsey, and David followed the very same migration path that Dennis followed in the same time frame, from Richmond to Spotsylvania (later Orange) County, Virginia, then to Edgecombe (later Granville) County, North Carolina (and, in David’s case, finally to Orange County, North Carolina). Continue reading “Additional Notes re: Phillips Families of Granville and Chatham Counties, North Carolina”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750

Jones, Edward to Dennis Lindsey, Edgecombe 1744 (Halifax DB 5, 213)
Deed of Edward Jones to Denis Linsey, 3 February 1744, Edgecombe County, North Carolina) (Halifax County, North Carolina Deed Bk. 5, p. 213)

Or, Subtitled: The Importance of Knowing County Boundary Changes as You Study Land Records

To sum up some salient points of the previous posting about Dennis Linchey’s/Lindsey’s post-indenture life in Virginia (abt. 1725-1734/5): once he was freed from indenture, likely about 1725, he did what we’d expect a young man recently freed from servitude to do: Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in North Carolina to 1750”

Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in Virginia

Virginia Statute, Irish Indentured Servants
William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large, Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia from the First Session of the Legislature in the Year 1619 (New York: Bartow, 1823), vol. 1, p. 411.

Or, Subtitled: A Failed Attempt to Patent Land, and Suits of Debt

To recap (and link to the two previous postings in this series [here and here]): as Brendan Wolfe and Martha McCartney tell us, the indenture of Irish servants in colonial Virginia was subject to a law that required Irish servants in the colony arriving without indenture papers to serve six years if they were above sixteen, and up to their twenty-fourth year in any case.[1] Continue reading “Dennis Linchey/Lindsey (abt. 1700-1762): Post-Indenture Life in Virginia”