The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650)

Ancestry of Richard Nottingham of Virginia, Per Cedric Nottingham
Chart of the ancestry of Richard Nottingham, immigrant to Northampton County, Virginia, as outlined by Cedric Nottingham, “The Nottingham Surname: The Virginian Connection

Or, Subtitled: The Ifs, Ands, and Buts of Establishing a Pedigree for 17th-Century Virginia Immigrants

When it comes to pinning down the pre-Virginia origins of the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family of Northampton County, Virginia, Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692), there are many ifs, ands, and buts. To my knowledge, the only researcher who has worked intensively on this project is Cedric Nottingham, to whom I introduced readers in a previous posting. In his monograph “The Nottingham Surname: The Virginian Connection,” he relates how, after assiduous research, he, his wife Christine, and his brother Tom came to the conclusion that it’s very likely Richard Nottingham of Northampton County, Virginia, is the son of an older Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650), a merchant of Stepney in the east end of London whose roots lie in Ipswich in County Suffolk. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (1587-1640/1650)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (4)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)
Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (bottom)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (bottom)
Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 211
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 211

Or, Subtitled: When London Is Transplanted to Virginia’s Eastern Shore

Now to end our chronicle of the life of Richard Nottingham, the immigrant ancestor of that family in Northampton County, Virginia: Richard made his will 24 September 1692, and it was proven in Northampton court on 29 November 1692.[1] Here’s my transcript of the will: Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (4)”

The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)

Nottingham, Richard, Will, Northampton Co., VA, Orders and Wills 13, 1689-98, p. 210 (1)
Will of Richard Nottingham, Northampton County, Virginia, Orders and Wills Bk. 13, p. 210 (top)

Or, Subtitled: “Wee the Inhabitants of Northampton Countie Doe Complayne”

In my last posting, I introduced you to the immigrant ancestor of the Nottingham family in Northampton County, Virginia, Richard Nottingham, who was born in England around 1618-1621. I told you that various published accounts of his pre-Virginia life, some of them echoing longstanding tales in the Nottingham family, suggest that he came to Virginia after the defeat of Charles I in 1646, that he arrived with a wife who had the title of Lady and is identified in family stories as Elizabeth Hatton or Hutton, that he came overseas bringing a large sum of money, and that he bought a large tract of land soon after his arrival in Virginia. Continue reading “The Nottingham Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787-1850/1860): Richard Nottingham (abt. 1620-1692) (2)”

Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)

Monk, William, Northampton Co., Va., Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, 1740-50, p. 531 (1)
Will of William Monk, Northampton County, Virginia, Wills and Inventories 27-R, #19, p. 531 (part 1).

Or, Subtitled: Hand Mills, Small Swords, and Beds and Bolsters

In my last posting, I pointed you to the 18 September 1749 will of William Monk in Northampton County, Virginia, to show you that Nottingham Monk, who died before 20 July 1793 in Bertie County, North Carolina, was William’s son: the will names him as such.[1] The first record I find of William Monk in Northampton County is in another will: on 19 February 1708/9 William Munk and William Munk Jr. witnessed the will of Samuel Palmer, along with Robert Howsen and William Dyer.[2] The two Monk men signed by mark. Continue reading “Tracing the Ancestry of Strachan Monk (1787 – 1850/1860) to Northampton County, Virginia: William Monk (abt. 1690 – 1750) (2)”