Children of Dennis Lindsey (1812 – 1879) by Wives Louisa F. Styles and Mary S. Roman (Cunningham)

Photo of William Thomas Gordon from 18 April 1921 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 1578, certificates 23250-23625, 22 April 1921-23 April 1921; certificate 23487
Photo of Mary Belle Gordon from 6 February 1919 passport application, NARA, U.S. Passport Applications, 1795-1925, vol. 707, certificates 65000-65249, 19 February 1919-21 February 1919; certificate 65132

Or, Subtitled: A Branch of a Spartanburg County, South Carolina, Lindsey Family Establishes Itself in Atlanta Area by 1900

This posting is a continuation of a previous posting in which I discuss what I know about Dennis Lindsey (1812-1879), son of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. As that posting shows, by 1842, Dennis had settled in Hamburg, which was then in Edgefield District, South Carolina, where he spent his life up to the final year or two working as a cotton merchant. On 5 March 1843, he married Louisa F. Styles, daughter of Gabriel B. Styles and Rebecca Wood Farrow of Spartanburg County. 

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Rachel Lindsey and Second Husband William Halbert

William Halbert to Thomas M. Young, 9 March 1843, Laurens County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. O, p. 183
Relinquishment of dower by Rachel Lindsey Halbert for sale to Thomas M. Young, April 1843, Laurens County, South Carolina, Deed Bk. O, p. 187

Or, Subtitled: “Being Unfortunate in His Business He Moved”

This posting continues a discussion of records documenting the life of Rachel Lindsey (1800/1810 – 1845), daughter of William Lindsey and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In two previous postings about Rachel (here and here), I discussed her first husband Jacob Cooper, whom Rachel appears to have married between 1820-1828, and her family by Jacob. As the previous posting (the second link in the preceding sentence) notes, following Jacob’s death in Spartanburg County sometime before 15 November 1829, Rachel then remarried between 28 January and 26 April 1830 to William Anson Halbert of Laurens County. Rachel appears in the estate sale documents of Jacob Cooper on 28 January as Rachel Cooper, but on 26 April 1830, William Halbert applied to Spartanburg County court to be made administrator of Jacob Cooper’s estate, noting that he had married Rachel, Jacob’s widow. It’s likely this marriage occurred on or near to 26 April 1830.[1]

Children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest — Rachel Lindsey and First Husband Jacob Cooper (1)

History of Franklin, Jefferson, Washington, Crawford & Gasconade Counties, Missouri (Goodspeed: Chicago, 1888), p. 1059

Or, Subtitled: “There Is Some Confusion… More Information Is Sought

This posting is a continuation of my discussion of the children of William Lindsey (1760/1770 – 1840) and Rachel Earnest of Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In three previous postings, I discussed William and Rachel’s children Cassandra, John, and Nicy Malinda, then their children Elizabeth and Isaac, and then their sons Mark and Henry Lindsey.

The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795)

Lindsey Direct Line Mark to Wm. Dennis

Or, Subtitled: Documenting Lives with “Receets” and Tombstones

As I told you when I began my postings about William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806), son of Dennis Lindsey the immigrant, I have not found absolute proof that the William Lindsey who claimed land in 1768 on the Enoree River in what was later Spartanburg County, South Carolina, is the son William named in Dennis’ 1762 will in Granville County, North Carolina. I am persuaded, however, that these two Williams are the same person, and in the posting I have just linked, I provided you with my reasons for concluding this — compelling ones, it seems to me. Continue reading “The Children of William Lindsey (abt. 1733-abt. 1806): Dennis Lindsey (abt. 1755-1795)”

“The Reputed Father of a Child … Will Not Be Permitted Afterwards to Bastardize Such Issue”: The Case of Ezekiel Samuel Green (and His Father Samuel Kerr Green) (1)

Louisiana Reports, Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Louisiana, vol. 4
Louisiana Reports, Cases Argued and Determined in the Supreme Court of Louisiana, vol. 4, A.N. Ogden, reporter (New Orleans: Price Current, 1850), p. 39.

Here’s an experience I’ve had, oh, once or twice (including in my several decades of doing family history): I’m motoring along, absolutely certain I know where I’m headed, and all of a sudden, a signpost appears by the roadside telling me I’ve been on the wrong road all the time. When I was certain I knew where I was going — certain that I knew what I knew. . . . Continue reading ““The Reputed Father of a Child … Will Not Be Permitted Afterwards to Bastardize Such Issue”: The Case of Ezekiel Samuel Green (and His Father Samuel Kerr Green) (1)”